AIM round 3 2019

jonathan
CUSP
Jonathan Bruno
13793 Omega Circle
80124
719-433-6775
719-433-6775
jonathan@cusp.ws
Yes

Test organization

Personnel Capacity

Test

Yes

test

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Cuchara-Map-2.pdf

test

Yes

Yes
test

test

test

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable.pdf

test

test

test

test

test

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Cuchara-Map.pdf

test

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UnitedStates

test

CO

test

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Cuchara-Map-1.pdf
q
q
q
q
q
7082057505
7082057505
alison.mccluskey@gmail.com
Yes

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy generosity

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a dinosaur bone garden

Personnel Capacity

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a dinosaur garden

Yes

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a dinosaur bone garden

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet.pdf

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely Mister Bojangles listens

Yes
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1jRFhza0v1J7Fo4he_4u2MJKOOqq_N90x
Yes
A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy generosity

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely Mister Bojangles listens

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to universe standard time.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-1.pdf

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a beloved mistress, then I often think with longing, Oh, would I could describe these conceptions, could impress upon paper all that is living so full and warm within me, that it might be the mirror of my soul, as my soul is the mirror of the infinite God! O my friend — but it is too much for my strength — I sink under the weight of the splendour of these visions! A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single Rowan Thomas Eva Cassidy Childhood friends

Date:
Milestone:

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a beloved mistress, then I often think with longing, Oh, would I could describe these conceptions, could impress upon paper all that is living so full and warm within me, that it might be the mirror of my soul, as my soul is the mirror of the infinite God! O my friend — but it is too much for my strength — I sink under the weight of the splendour of these visions! A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the way things used universal happiness protocal.

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a beloved mistress, then I often think with longing, Oh, would I could describe these conceptions, could impress upon paper all that is living so full and warm within me, that it might be the mirror of my soul, as my soul is the mirror of the infinite God! O my friend — but it is too much for my strength — I sink under the weight of the splendour of these visions! A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the way things used universal happiness protocal.

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a beloved mistress, then I often think with longing, Oh, would I could describe these conceptions, could impress upon paper all that is living so full and warm within me, that it might be the mirror of my soul, as my soul is the mirror of the infinite God! O my friend — but it is too much for my strength — I sink under the weight of the splendour of these visions! A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the way things used universal happiness protocal.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/MOA-tellerco.pdf

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image universe precipitates gathering

[268]
[269]
[270]

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a dinosaur bone garden

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image universe precipitates gathering

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a dinosaur bone garden

A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image universe precipitates gathering

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Selection-Panel-Call_0819.pptx
Test o matic community mitigation
Coco
Testy testor
pobox 726
LAKE GEORGE
7198389619
7198389619
ravage@CUSP.WS
Yes

organizatio

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Planning, Equipment Purchase

summary

Yes

We get money, impact is assured

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/ARWC.jpg

blah blah

Yes
http://cnn.com
Yes

budget

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/COCO-Logo-Final-Large-150×150.jpg

Blargg

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/COCO-Logo-Final.pdf

now

[268]
[269]
[270]

strategic as hell

I need to buy stuff

seedlings, saplings and rock outcroppings

Imperial ruler

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AED-150×150.jpg
Hesperus Fuel Break
Hesperus Connections
Pamella Wilson
180 County Road 122A
Hesperus, CO 81326
970-259-1927
970-259-1927
paminhesp@gmail.com
Yes

Our organization got our start back in 2001 we when I first moved here and recognized the high wildfire risk that our 15,000 person community faces. Hesperus is located in western La Plata County in what is commonly known as the “dry side.” The organization has two employees, the Director and a Project Manager. We work in close partnership with Ft. Lewis Mesa Fire to provide education to residents about their wildfire risk and support mitigation projects to reduce that risk. Over the years we have established a chipping program provided by the fire department and have done mitigation projects on about 2,800 acres. Ooidiuf ouiudld fjeiwon ddd alksj souodl bbbkdj 9930 acdlkj alksjdf aodiiromn889 22 shouts alkgic woiudlll slldike skjiy bofr. slkdur soidc09 aoiucld iosiudfje sliud. soidl soidle liek cighgliqw9 aoi939jbm aoiud95 sski and likes. The majority of requested funds will support the Stewardship Crew Project Lead position that will coordinate all project level activities with partners, oversee hiring and training of crew members, and represent Mt. Adams Resource Stewards in expanding and implementing fire adapted community strategies on multiple ownerships across the Mt. Adams landscape. This capacity support will be essential to developing and managing a capable crew available for the 2019 field season. Funds for

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Equipment Purchase

The Mt. Adams area of southern Washington, like much of the West, has experienced an increase in fire
intensity and frequency over the past two decades across a patchwork of federal, state, tribal and
private forestland surrounding a scattering of rural communities in and near the Columbia River Gorge.
Mt. Adams Resource Stewards (MARS), a community-based nonprofit established in 2004, is in part a
response to local concerns about the growing threat from wildfire and declining forest health on both
public and private lands. After several years of efforts with little success to support the development of
local businesses and contractors to address land stewardship and fuels reduction capacity gaps, MARS
launched a stewardship and fuels crew initiative in 2018.
Our initial “pilot” season was largely successful, supporting prescribed burn unit preparation and
implementation on a 109-acre cross-boundary burn (federal and private), completing fuels reduction on
an additional 43 acres and defensible space work around three homes. Additionally, the crew completed
80 acres of noxious weed treatments, 23 acres of meadow enhancement and provided forest technician
support (tree marking, layout, etc) on various other projects.
The objective of this undertaking is to grow local capacity to reduce the risk of wildfire to Mt. Adams
communities

Yes

The Mt. Adams area of southern Washington, like much of the West, has experienced an increase in fire intensity and frequency over the past two decades across a patchwork of federal, state, tribal and private forestland surrounding a scattering of rural communities in and near the Columbia River Gorge. Mt. Adams Resource Stewards (MARS), a community-based nonprofit established in 2004, is in part a response to local concerns about the growing threat from wildfire and declining forest health on both public and private lands. After several years of efforts with little success to support the development of local businesses and contractors to address land stewardship and fuels reduction capacity gaps, MARSlaunched a stewardship and fuels crew initiative in 2018. Our initial “pilot” season was largely successful, supporting prescribed burn unit preparation and implementation on a 109-acre cross-boundary burn (federal and private), completing fuels reduction on an additional 43 acres and defensible space work around three homes. Additionally, the crew completed 80 acres of noxious weed treatments, 23 acres of meadow enhancement and provided forest technician support (tree marking, layout, etc) on various other projects. The objective of this undertaking is to grow local capacity to reduce the risk of wildfire to Mt. Adams communities

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/FirewiseSubsMap.pdf

YES. The area has experienced three large, destructive wildfires ranging in size from 8,000 acres to over
50,000 acres since 2008 and was recently prioritized by collaborative group members and Washington
DNR for treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year
Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “South GP
Collaborative Area” the project area where darker polygons reflect the highest HUC 6 Priority
Watersheds. Rankings were determined by a “composite r

Yes
https://static.colostate.edu/client-files/csfs/pdfs/Final-VDO-CWPP-2012.pdf
Yes

The budget represents the combined cost of the Stewardship Crew Project Lead position (full yearcapacity), Upper White Project implementation (partial year, full crew cost funded on a per acre basis that cannot be used for crew coordinator/capacity) and monitoring and outreach support provided by
our monitoring coordinator. Additional labor costs associated with project work that would be securedby the Project Lead is not identified in this budget. Labor and contractual costs with asterisk reflect current uncertainties as we are developing our agreement with Washington DNR that will guide the
$375,000 grant, and at this point it is unclear as to what portion of the funds will be allocated for MARS’s Crew as “Labor” and what portion will be contracted out, especially for fuels treatment requiring heavy equipment.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Test.xlsx

The South Mount Adams landscape is characterized as transitional dry mixed conifer forest that istypical of forests in Central Washington and the east slopes of the Cascades that have experienced various growing threats to forest health in recent decades. Deteriorating forest health resulted from overstocked stands that have changed in species composition and structure due to altered fire regimes (suppression of frequent, low intensity fires), past timber harvest practices, changing climate and other factors. An outbreak of western spruce budworm – a defoliating moth that targets true firs and Douglasfir – dramatically affected the area in the late 1990’s through early 2000’s. Mountain pine beetle then caused high levels of mortality in stands of lodgepole pine in upper elevations. This contributed significantly to fuel loadings in the affected region, which in turn fueled the major aforementioned fires in 2008, 2012 and 2015. Large parts of the landscape – especially closer to populated areas – were spared by these larger fires. Yet these forests are primed for fire, hence the need for the activities that are the subject of this proposal. As described above, Washington DNR recently assessed forest health and wildfire threat across central and eastern Washington as part of their 20-year forest health strategy, and the Mt. Adams area was identified as a high statewide priority due to wildfire hazard and forest health concerns, which led to the matching grant funds from the state to complete fuels reduction activities on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The South Mount Adams landscape is characterized as transitional dry mixed conifer forest that istypical of forests in Central Washington and the east slopes of the Cascades that have experiencedvarious growing threats to forest health in recent decades. Deteriorating forest health resulted from overstocked stands that have changed in species composition and structure due to altered fire regimes (suppression of frequent, low intensity fires), past timber harvest practices, changing climate and other factors. An outbreak of western spruce budworm – a defoliatin

The Scope of Work primarily describes capacity building aspects of the project, as requested funds will support a new position with MARS managing a crew for which funding has been secured (matching dollars) to implement fuels work. Requested funds match a secured Weyerhaeuser Family Foundation grant and minor tasks funded through the Washington Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network. The Stewardship Crew Project Lead is anticipated to begin in March 2019 as a full-time salaried position with partial benefits (to include sick/vacation leave and retirement after six months), and responsibilities consist of three phases: March-April (approx. 320 hours @ 23.53/hr) – Project, Partnership/Contract and Crew Development Phase to include:  Attend regular meetings with USFS and other partners to support project planning efforts;  Assist outreach efforts to broader public, and specifically fire districts and adjacent landowners regarding Stewardship Crew’s capacity and availability for additional project work;  Crew member recruitment process to included outreach to area educational institutions, WorkSource and other entities to advertise Crew employment opportunities;  Oversee hiring process;  Arrange and attend necessary trainings to advance personal/positional duties, that could include Single Resource Boss qualifications, etc.;  Schedule and support necessary training needs for crew to include chainsaw certifications, basic firefighter training, wilderness first aid, etc.;  Work with MARS ED to identify and manage equipment and logistical needs necessary for crew function and a smooth start-up phase;  Coordinate with Washington Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network to develop annual work plan and meet deliverables; May-November (approx. 1385 hours @ $23.53/hr) – Crew Administration and Project Implementation Phase  Coordinate with MARS Admin Support and ED to schedule Crew with partners, manage logistical needs, support account/contract and payroll management, and monitor all aspects of Crew performance; Oversee day-to-day operations of four-person Crew in a safe, productive and professional manner while maintaining a constructive leadership role with crew; Liaise with project partners in order to effectively complete project tasks, deliverables and timelines; Support from Monitoring and Outreach Coordinator to track, document, measure and monitorCrew’s progress on all projects to support future reporting and outreach material development(245 hours of total period’s allotment).December-March (approximately 800 hours @ $23.53/hr) – Crew Wrap-Up and Transition to Year Three
 Close-out Crew to include exit interviews

MARS completed our initial roll out of the Stewardship Crew in 2018 with alengthy list of equipment needs that are essential to growing capacity of the Crew. These include a mix of “big ticket” items, like an ORV, utility trailer and a second 4×4 vehicle (staff from different programs competed for the only vehicle MARS owns) and smaller ticket items, like an additional chainsaw, gps units and a laptop computer. We’d like to work with the new Crew Lead to review lists and lessons from 2018 and prioritize equipment items given a limited budget allocation to best increase the Crew’s
capacity and ability to increase wildfire risk mitigation measures in 2019.

See Scope of Work for projected timelines. We are in the process of hiring the Project Leader as a fulltime
permanent position pending success with securing funds for the full year.
May – Dec — Hire staff and start implementing projects, increased capacity for outreach and implementation, 14 d-space projects completed, 21 acres treated
Jan – Feb – evaluate completed projects and adjust program
Mar – Apr. – Hire more crew members, secure work agreements, begin implemenenttation

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Mt. Adams Resource Stewards and project partners have been consistently challenged by the lack of an available and qualified local workforce to implement fuels reduction and non-commercial forestry work. As a result, in 2018 MARS launched a four-person crew that effectively piloted this new undertaking for
the organization. The effort was widely viewed as a success but was financially and practically challenged for a number of reasons that we are seeking to address by bolstering capacity and capacity related funding going into our second year. We view this as essential to our success with the Upper White Project, which represents a major increase in acres and deliverables for the Stewardship Crew, as well as strategic non-federal acres that will be added into the work plan upon increased Crew capacity. A successful Stewardship Crew Project is a potential game-changer in a longer term effort to create more engaged, fire-adapted communities and more fire resilient landscapes. Implementation work by the Crew will be supported by Washington state’s first investments in federal lands forest health work and truly represents a collective response to addressing wildfire and forest health concerns at a scale that intends to lead to meaningful, enduring outcomes. a longer term effort to create more engaged, fire-adapted communities and m

Essentially, MARS has one of several pieces fully in place for us to deploy a successful crew in 2019 and beyond: state funding for on-the-ground treatment in a high priority portion of the Gifford Pinchot NF.We are lacking funds that could match our Weyerhaeuser Family Foundation capacity grant to fully fund a project leader, that will hire/supervise the crew and develop the year’s work plan for projects on non-federal lands that strategically compliment work to occur on the Gifford Pinchot NF. This is essential forMARS to develop capacity of a new program to a level where we can perform at the highest level in marketing and fulfilling commitments to project partners. Without this funding, we could embed some Program Lead costs into contract rates but would not be able to cover first and third phases of the Scope of Work described above. Trying to cover the implementation phase of the Scope of Work, at least initially, sets the Project Lead for failure with too much being asked of the position for too little compensation. The requested funding is critical to be able to attract a hig

Upper White Project PartnersUSFS – Gifford Pinchot National Forest – will oversee all projects and contribute $57,700 of in-kind match in personnel/crew time to work on fuels projects and pile burning.Cascade Forest Conservancy – Is providing a volunteer crew to assist in prescribed burn unit prep.South Gifford Pinchot Collaborative Group – led efforts to secure state funding for Upper White Project and will continue to play a role in engaging stakeholders in the project.Washington Department of Natural Resources – worked with collaborative group and USFS to assess and prioritize area for treatments and is providing $375,000 in cash for on-ground project implementation.Broader Collaborations, Partners and Supporters that will utilize the Stewardship Crew outside of Upper White Projec tKlickitat County – engages MARS in countywide planning and advisory roles relative to wildfire protection and natural resources. Washington DNR – MARS is partnering with DNR to conduct similar work on the Trout Lake Preserve (Natural Area) and other state lands.USFWS – Conboy Lake NWR – a major partner for MARS through a Cooperative Land Management Agreement in its sixth year. During the 2019 season MARS anticipates implementing stand treatments and fuels work on an additional 50 acres of national wildlife refuge. Underwood Conservation Dilkjfldska

Given the nature of this proposal – a capacity funding request linked to a direct on-the-ground projects, monitoring will be extensive. MARS has a monitoring coordinator on staff that will work with the Project Leader and partners to monitor outputs. Monitoring protocols will likely combine fuels monitoring protocols (we use modified Brown’s transects and photo points with any additional techniques that project partners may utilize). Various photopoints will also be established. The Project Lead will coordinate with the MARS Monitoring Lead to develop a broader monitoring program to assess project
level and annual/cumulative impacts of the Crew. The Project Lead will coordinate with the MARS Monitoring Lead to develop a broader monitoring program to assess project level and annual/cumulative impacts of the Crew. The Project Lead will coordinate with the MARS Monitoring Lead to develop a broader monitoring program to assess project level and annual/cumulative impacts of the Crew. The Project Lead will coordinate with the MARS Monitoring Lead to develop a broader monitoring program

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/2017_Interest-Letter.docx, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Subdivision_INFO.doc
Maria’s Test
Coalitions & Collaboratives, Inc
Maria Petkas
127 Alpine Meadows LN
Florissant/CO/80816
719-302-2852
719-213-5161
maria.petkash@co-co.org
Yes

50 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

271 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TE

Fuels Reduction, Planning

301 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TE

Yes

271 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TE

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/IMG_1393-150×150.jpg

100 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

Yes
https://static.colostate.edu/client-files/csfs/pdfs/PoudreFireAuthorityCWPP.pdf
Yes

100 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

150 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-2.pdf

400 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

150 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

150 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

150 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

150 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/newletter-template-2.pdf

200 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

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301 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TESTTEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TESTTEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TES

200 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

303 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST T TEST TEST T

200 WORDS: TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST TEST

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/SF425-July-19-filed-August-19.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/270-425-June-19-filed-July-19.pdf
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Report-for-July-19-filed-August-19.pdfTest
Test
Test
Test
Test
123456789
123456789
Test@gmail.com
Yes

Test

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Planning, Equipment Purchase

Test

Yes

Test

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/COCO-Logo-Final-1.pdf

Test

Yes
http://something.com
Yes

Test

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/testtest_AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable.pdf

Test

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/COCO-Logo-Final-2.pdf

Test

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Test

Test

Test

Test

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/COCO-Logo-Final-3.pdf
Hesperus Open Space fuels Reduction
Hesperus Community Connections
Pamella Wilson
paminhesp@gmail.com
Hesperus, CO 81326
970-259-1927
970-799-2926
paminhesp@gmail.com
Yes

Our organization got our start back in 2001 we when I first moved here and recognized the high wildfire risk that our 15,000 person community faces. Hesperus is located in western La Plata County in what is commonly known as the “dry side.” The organ

Our organization got our start back in 2001 we when I first moved here and recognized the high wildfire risk that our 15,000 person community faces. Hesperus is located in western La Plata County in what is commonly known as the “dry side.” The organization has two employees, the Director and a Project Manager. We work in close partnership with Ft. Lewis Mesa Fire to provide education to residents about their wildfire risk and support mitigation projects to reduce that risk. Over the years we have established a chipping program provided by the fire department and have done mitigation projects on about 2,800 acres. Ooidiuf ouiudld fjeiwon ddd alksj souodl bbbkdj 9930 acdlkj alksjdf aodiiromn889 22 shouts alkgic woiudlll slldike skjiy bofr. slkdur soidc09 aoiucld iosiudfje sliud. soidl soidle liek cighgliqw9 aoi939jbm aoiud95 sski and likes. The majority of requested funds will support the Stewardship Crew Project Lead position that will coordinate all project level activities w

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Planning, Equipment Purchase

The Mt. Adams area of southern Washington, like much of the West, has experienced an increase in fire intensity and frequency over the past two decades across a patchwork of federal, state, tribal and private forestland surrounding a scattering of rural communities in and near the Columbia River Gorge. Mt. Adams Resource Stewards (MARS), a community-based nonprofit established in 2004, is in part a response to local concerns about the growing threat from wildfire and declining forest health on both public and private lands. After several years of efforts with little success to support the development of local businesses and contractors to address land stewardship and fuels reduction capacity gaps, MARS launched a stewardship and fuels crew initiative in 2018. Our initial “pilot” season was largely successful, supporting prescribed burn unit preparation and implementation on a 109-acre cross-boundary burn (federal and private), completing fuels reduction on an additional 43 acres and defensible space work around three homes. Additionally, the crew completed 80 acres of noxious weed treatments, 23 acres of meadow enhancement and provided forest technician support (tree marking, layout, etc) on various other projects. The objective of this undertaking is to grow local capacity to reduce the risk of wildfire to Mt. Adams communities Additionally, the crew completed 80 acres of noxious weed treatments, 23 acres of meadow enhancement and provided forest technician support (treelkj

Yes

Our organization got our start back in 2001 we when I first moved here and recognized the high wildfire risk that our 15,000 person community faces. Hesperus is located in western La Plata County in what is commonly known as the “dry side.” The organization has two employees, the Director and a Project Manager. We work in close partnership with Ft. Lewis Mesa Fire to provide education to residents about their wildfire risk and support mitigation projects to reduce that risk. Over the years we have established a chipping program provided by the fire department and have done mitigation projects on about 2,800 acres. Ooidiuf ouiudld fjeiwon ddd alksj souodl bbbkdj 9930 acdlkj alksjdf aodiiromn889 22 shouts alkgic woiudlll slldike skjiy bofr. slkdur soidc09 aoiucld iosiudfje sliud. soidl soidle liek cighgliqw9 aoi939jbm aoiud95 sski and likes. The majority of requested funds will support the Stewardship Crew Project Lead position that will coordinate all project level activities w

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Current_projected_WUI.pdf

YES. The area has experienced three large, destructive wildfires ranging in size from 8,000 acres to over 50,000 acres since 2008 and was recently prioritized by collaborative group members and Washington DNR for treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “South GP Collaborative Area” the project area where darker polygons reflect the highest HUC 6 Priority Wate

Yes
https://static.colostate.edu/client-files/csfs/pdfs/Final-VDO-CWPP-2012.pdf
Yes

YES. The area has experienced three large, destructive wildfires ranging in size from 8,000 acres to over 50,000 acres since 2008 and was recently prioritized by collaborative group members and Washington DNR for treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “South GP Collaborative Area” the project area where darker polygons reflect the highest HUC 6 Priority Wate

The budget represents the combined cost of the Stewardship Crew Project Lead position (full yearcapacity), Upper White Project implementation (partial year, full crew cost funded on a per acre basis that cannot be used for crew coordinator/capacity) and monitoring and outreach support provided by
our monitoring coordinator. Additional labor costs associated with project work that would be securedby the Project Lead is not identified in this budget. Labor and contractual costs with asterisk reflect current uncertainties as we are developing our agreement with Washington DNR that will guide the $375,000 grant, and at this point it is unclear as to what portion of the funds will be allocated for MARS’s Crew as “Labor” and what portion will be

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-1-1.pdf

The South Mount Adams landscape is characterized as transitional dry mixed conifer forest that is typical of forests in Central Washington and the east slopes of the Cascades that have experienced various growing threats to forest health in recent decades. Deteriorating forest health resulted from overstocked stands that have changed in species composition and structure due to altered fire regimes (suppression of frequent, low intensity fires), past timber harvest practices, changing climate and other factors. An outbreak of western spruce budworm – a defoliating moth that targets true firs and Douglas fir – dramatically affected the area in the late 1990’s through early 2000’s. Mountain pine beetle then caused high levels of mortality in stands of lodgepole pine in upper elevations. This contributed significantly to fuel loadings in the affected region, which in turn fueled the major aforementioned fires in 2008, 2012 and 2015. Large parts of the landscape – especially closer to populated areas – were spared by these larger fires. Yet these forests are primed for fire, hence the need for the activities that are the subject of this proposal. As described above, Washington DNR recently assessed forest health and wildfire threat across central and eastern Washington as part of their 20-year forest health strategy, and the Mt. Adams area was identified as a high statewide priority due to wildfire hazard and forest health concerns, which led to the matching grant funds from the state to complete fuels reduction activities on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The South Mount Adams landscape is characterized as transitional dry mixed conifer forest that is typical of forests in Central Washington and the east slopes of the Cascades that have experienced various growing threats to forest health in recent decades. Deteriorating forest health resulted from overstocked stands that have changed in species composition and structure due to altered fire regimes (suppression of

The Scope of Work primarily describes capacity building aspects of the project, as requested funds will support a new position with MARS managing a crew for which funding has been secured (matching dollars) to implement fuels work. Requested funds match a secured Weyerhaeuser Family Foundation grant and minor tasks funded through the Washington Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network. The Stewardship Crew Project Lead is anticipated to begin in March 2019 as a full-time salaried position with partial benefits (to include sick/vacation leave and retirement after six months), and responsibilities consist of three phases: March-April (approx. 320 hours @ 23.53/hr) – Project, Partnership/Contract and Crew Development Phase to include:  Atten

The Scope of Work primarily describes capacity building aspects of the project, as requested funds will support a new position with MARS managing a crew for which funding has been secured (matching dollars) to implement fuels work. Requested funds match a secured Weyerhaeuser Family Foundation grant and minor tasks funded through the Washington Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network. The Stewardship Crew Project Lead is anticipated to begin in March 2019 as a full-time salaried position with partial benefits (to include sick/vacation leave and retirement after six months), and responsibilities consist of three phases: March-April (approx. 320 hours @ 23.53/hr) – Project, Partnership/Contract and Crew Development Phase to include:  Atten

The Scope of Work primarily describes capacity building aspects of the project, as requested funds will support a new position with MARS managing a crew for which funding has been secured (matching dollars) to implement fuels work. Requested funds match a secured Weyerhaeuser Family Foundation grant and minor tasks funded through the Washington Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network. The Stewardship Crew Project Lead is anticipated to begin in March 2019 as a full-time salaried position with partial benefits (to include sick/vacation leave and retirement after six months), and responsibilities consist of three phases: March-April (approx. 320 hours @ 23.53/hr) – Project, Partnership/Contract and Crew Development Phase to include:  Atten

The Scope of Work primarily describes capacity building aspects of the project, as requested funds will support a new position with MARS managing a crew for which funding has been secured (matching dollars) to implement fuels work. Requested funds match a secured Weyerhaeuser Family Foundation grant and minor tasks funded through the Washington Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network. The Stewardship Crew Project Lead is anticipated to begin in March 2019 as a full-time salaried position with partial benefits (to include sick/vacation leave and retirement after six months), and responsibilities consist of three phases: March-April (approx. 320 hours @ 23.53/hr) – Project, Partnership/Contract and Crew Development Phase to include:  Atten

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/FirewiseSubsMap-1.pdf

Our organization got our start back in 2001 we when I first moved here and recognized the high wildfire risk that our 15,000 person community faces. Hesperus is located in western La Plata County in what is commonly known as the “dry side.” The organization has two employees, the Director and a Project Manager. We work in close partnership with Ft. Lewis Mesa Fire to provide education to residents about their wildfire risk and support mitigation projects to reduce that risk. Over the years we have established a chipping program provided by the fire department and have done mitigation projects on about 2,800 acres. Ooidiuf ouiudld fjeiwon ddd alksj souodl bbbkdj 9930 acdlkj alksjdf aodiiromn889 22 shouts alkgic woiudlll slldike skjiy bofr. slkdur soidc09 aoiucld iosiudfje sliud. soidl soidle liek cighgliqw9 aoi939jbm aoiud95 sski and likes. The majority of requested funds will support the Stewardship Crew Project Lead position that will coordinate all project level activities w

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8,000 acres to over 50,000 acres since 2008 and was recently prioritized by collaborative group members and Washington DNR for treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “South GP Collaborative Area” the project area where darker polygons reflect the highest HUC 6 Priority Watersheds. Rankings were determined by a “composite ralsdkfjalskdfic adslifj destructive wildfires ranging in size from 8,000 acres to over 50,000 acres since 2008 and was recently prioritized by collaborative group members and Washington DNR for treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “YES. The area has experienced three large, destructive wildfires ranging in size from 8,000 acres to over 50,000 acres since 2008 and was recently prioritized by collaborative group members and Washington DNR for treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “South GP Collaborative Area” thaldkfjiickei treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “YES. The area has experienced three large,

Our organization got our start back in 2001 we when I first moved here and recognized the high wildfire risk that our 15,000 person community faces. Hesperus is located in western La Plata County in what is commonly known as the “dry side.” The organization has two employees, the Director and a Project Manager. We work in close partnership with Ft. Lewis Mesa Fire to provide education to residents about their wildfire risk and support mitigation projects to reduce that risk. Over the years we have established a chipping program provided by the fire department and have done mitigation projects on about 2,800 acres. Ooidiuf ouiudld fjeiwon ddd alksj souodl bbbkdj 9930 acdlkj alksjdf aodiiromn889 22 shouts alkgic woiudlll slldike skjiy bofr. slkdur soidc09 aoiucld iosiudfje sliud. soidl soidle liek cighgliqw9 aoi939jbm aoiud95 sski and likes. The majority of requested funds will support the Stewardship Crew Project Lead position that will coordinate all project level activities w

8,000 acres to over 50,000 acres since 2008 and was recently prioritized by collaborative group members and Washington DNR for treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “South GP Collaborative Area” the project area where darker polygons reflect the highest HUC 6 Priority Watersheds. Rankings were determined by a “composite ralsdk fjalskdfic adslifj destructive wildfires ranging in size from 8,000 acres to over 50,000 acres since 2008 and was recently prioritized by collaborative group members and Washington DNR for treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “YES. The area has experienced three large, destructive wildfires ranging in size from 8,000 acres to over 50,000 acres since 2008 and was recently prioritized by collaborative group members and Washington DNR for treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “South GP Collaborative Area” thaldkfjiickei treatment and relevance to cross-boundary considerations as part of Washington’s 20-Year Forest Health Strategic Plan. The DNR generated map (Exhibit A) depicts in the map titled “YES. The area has experienced three large,

Our organization got our start back in 2001 we when I first moved here and recognized the high wildfire risk that our 15,000 person community faces. Hesperus is located in western La Plata County in what is commonly known as the “dry side.” The organization has two employees, the Director and a Project Manager. We work in close partnership with Ft. Lewis Mesa Fire to provide education to residents about their wildfire risk and support mitigation projects to reduce that risk. Over the years we have established a chipping program provided by the fire department and have done mitigation projects on about 2,800 acres. Ooidiuf ouiudld fjeiwon ddd alksj souodl bbbkdj 9930 acdlkj alksjdf aodiiromn889 22 shouts alkgic woiudlll slldike skjiy bofr. slkdur soidc09 aoiucld iosiudfje sliud. soidl soidle liek cighgliqw9 aoi939jbm aoiud95 sski and likes. The majority of requested funds will support the Stewardship Crew Project Lead position that will coordinate all project level activities w

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/2008-Speaker-Registration-Form.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Bales_Donation.pdf
Juab Fuels Mitigation program
Juab County , Special Service Fire District
Fred Garbett
160 N main
Nephi Utah 84648
435-623-3402
801-367-9208
fredg@juabcounty.com
Yes

In the year of 2000, 9 communities within Juab County Utah, established the Juab Special Service District. With the intent of improving fire response and prevention for the county. 3406 square miles are protected by 87 volunteer firefighters, 3 fuels reduction specialists, and 1 County/State appointed fire warden.
Of the 3406 square miles, there are 211,000 privately owned acres that are identified in the Utah Risk Assessment Program as “extreme” or very high. The Juab fuels Program of the Juab Special Service Fire District, is responsible for identifying project needs, managing the projects, and funding the projects for a minimum of 24 months in advance. This also includes continued maintenance of all other completed projects.

Equipment Purchase

Juab fuels program is looking for assistance in the purchase of an ASV 120 forestry Skid steer with masticator head. thru extensive research this machine is best designed for the task. This additional equipment will provide increased fuels management capabilities within Juab County and the surrounding central Utah area.

Yes

The purchase of the additional equipment will provide enhanced fuels management operations to the Juab fuels program.
Enabling them to positively and efficiently do projects in an effort to increase protection to the residents, and visitors in Juab County.
Therefore augmenting the efforts of our State and federal mitigation programs in our region.
Approximately 80% of the County area is BLM or USFS lands.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Utah-WRAP-juab-.pdf

Infrastructures that run through the identified high risk areas include; Union pacific railroad’s main line and alternate route, Kern Rivers natural gas supply to Las Vegas and southern California, fiber optic feed to all parts east and west of Utah, PacifiCorp’s Current Creek power plant, liquid petroleum supply line transmitting to Las Vegas, recreational areas, and many others.

Yes
http://wildfirerisk.utah.gov
Yes

The Juab fuels program and the central area forester have recognized the need for additional equipment. In order to provide effective fuels management in a safe manner.
The local CWPP’s identify the needs for mitigation, however does not address the equipment or process
of mitigation.
The equipment needs and process are being implemented in the Juab County all hazard plan.
The all hazard plan is expected to be completed and adopted by January 2020.

Juab County will provide matching funds in the amount of $71,000 to the final price of $121,000 to purchase this piece of equipment.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-4.pdf

Entire area of Juab County.

This equipment will serve the Juab County Fuels program for the life of the machine. Under our excellent maintenance program, it will last for several years. Even in the extremely harsh conditions of fuels management. This machine will operate in conjunction with other machines to provide more effective production on mitigation projects. Providing a safer and more efficient program. With the planned outcome to provide increased fire protection to the area.

This equipment will serve Juab fuels program for the life of the machine.

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The addition of forestry machine will expand mitigation capabilities for Juab fuels program.

The Juab Fire District is requesting funding assistance in the purchase of an additional skid steer with masticator head. This machine is in the process of being purchased now, but is a large amount of money for a small fire district. The purchase is taking a large part of our operating budget. Limiting funding for direct mitigation, operating and maintenance costs. Without the additional equipment we are limited to smaller and less effective mitigation projects. Putting personnel out doing hand cutting operations, in proximity of equipment. Therefore causing an unsafe working condition for the foresters. The funding assistance on the cost of the machine would release the funds within our budget to go to operating objectives. ie; maintenance, fuel and personnel wages.

Juab County Fire District is able to pay $71,000 and with your kind assistance in providing the remaining $50,000. With the addition and continued use of this equipment, being properly maintained will last an extended time (years) and create a safer and more efficient work environment. Extensively improving the Juab County Fuels Program effectiveness.

The value of this machine will be readily apparent, by the increased safety and production rates in mitigation. As compared to the program that has been operated in the past.
In 2017 the Fuels program completed approximately 105 acres of high risk area.
In 2018 the Fuels program completed approximately 128 acres of high risk area.
In 2019 the Fuels program is projected to complete 191 acres of high risk area, providing the last quarter is with the additional machine.
The estimate when fully operational with the additional machine for 2020 will be easily 300 mitigated acres.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/State-of-Utah-letter.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Juab-County-AIM-letter.pdf
Bailey Area Emergency Evacuation Roadway Mitigation
Fire Adapted Bailey a 501(c)(3), EIN 82-5016282
John Van Doren
P.O. Box 465
Pine/CO/80470
303-838-9059
303-877-1447
john@kzhoa.net
Yes

We began in 2015 as an ad hoc Fire Safe Council started by two Firewise leaders that recognized the need for a more broad-based community approach to wildfire adaption. In March of 2018 we became a federally recognized 501(c)(3) named Fire Adapted Bailey.

We operate in a 311 square mile area in the unincorporated northern portion of Park County, CO, AKA “the Bailey Area”. Our board is made up of committed volunteers from our five recognized Bailey area Firewise USA communities.

Our Firewise leaders drive D-space work on the ground using HOA volunteers. At the community level we partner with the Platte Canyon Fire Protection District using grant money or more recently Crowdfunding to fund targeted mitigation work.

Since our beginning we have grown our Firewise footprint from 15% to over 40% of our residential parcel total and lead the effort to obtain a $300K FEMA grant to mitigate 150 acres on and around our local elementary school.

Fuels Reduction

This is a life safety wildfire adaption project. We will be fire mitigating fuel-heavy choke points in and adjacent to county road rights-of-way that currently serve as major emergency evacuation routes for the community. The outcome of this project will significantly improve the emergency evacuation risk profile for our community by reducing radiant heat exposure for evacuees. Secondary benefits include putting more winter sunshine on the roadways which will reduce roadway snow and ice accumulation and improve roadway safety. In addition, sight lines will improve and removing roadside fuel loads will reduce wildfire risk from roadway ignition sources like cigarette disposal.

Yes

Fire Adapted Bailey is 311 square miles of which only 21% (42,000 acres) is private land. We are surrounded by Public Lands (primarily USFS). Mitigation of our critical county egress routes, it will also improve the safety of critical ingress routes for local, State and USFS wildfire response. In addition, some of these routes (especially Shelton Drive and CR72) are potential anchor points for backfires. The effectiveness and safety of these backfire anchor points will also be enhanced.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/BaileyWildfireHazard-1-150×150.png

“The Bailey area is the largest area of high risk, in that it contains the largest population and amount of development in Park County. This area is located within, and adjacent to, heavily forested lands with a high fire occurrence history, including several large fires. The region has high values at risk, generally high fuels risk, and a high ignition risk.” – Park County CWPP.

According to the Park County HMP, the Bailey area has an exposed building value of $1.1-billion.

Yes
https://www.fireadaptedbailey.org/uploads/3/0/8/8/30884711/park_county_cwpp_2009.pdf
No
Evacuation was not considered in the Park County CWPP.

Evacuation routes were not considered in the County CWPP. Evacuation routes were, however, identified as the highest priority in the Fire Adapted Bailey Self-Assessment (using the Fire Adapted Communities Self-Assessment Tool). In addition, the Forest Stewards Guild has been contracted to facilitate the completion of a new CWPP for the Platte Canyon Fire Protection District. This new CWPP will include emergency evacuation modeling and planning.

Labor – 23 Ten person crew days, Platte Canyon FPD, Wildland Fire Module
Supplies – Diesel, gas, and chainsaw oil.
Equipment – Trucks, chipper & chainsaws billed at standard Colorado Wildland Fire rates.
Indirect – Fire Adapted Bailey admin costs & expenses
Matching Funds – $54K in matching funds have already been raised from a Fire Adapted Bailey crowdfunding campaign started in October 2018 and ending in March 2019.
Note that we are only requesting $25K due to Wildland Fire Module scheduling constraints.
Cost per Acre: $1,667

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-FAB.pdf

The Bailey area encompasses 311 square miles of which only 21% is private land. USFS land surrounds a private land island which is adjacent to and served by state highway 285. The private land area is entirely in the WUI, in a fire suppressed and overgrown Montane ecosystem dominated by Ponderosa Pine, lodgepole, and Douglas Fir.

According to the CSFS Colorado Risk Portal, the entire Bailey area is designated as moderate to high risk. Major fires in the area include the High Meadow Fire in 2000 and the Snaking Fire in 2002. Recent fires include the Shooting Range Fire, the Shawnee Peak Fire, and the 64-Alpha Fire which triggered mandatory evacuations.

Most of our private land area was formally ranch land which beginning in the sixties slowly became subdivided as the area evolved into a metro Denver bedroom community. The current 68 subdivisions in the area were developed with little thought of wildfire. As a result, evacuation is now a major concern with one way in, one way out, two lane county roads with 60-foot ROW’s serving much of the population.

According to the Park County HMP, the area has over $1-billion in exposed residential and commercial building value. The current population is estimated at 11,000 and the majority of homes are owner occupied with ~75% of our working population commuting to metro Denver for work. We currently estimate that about 25% of our residential properties have completed D-space work.

Other Community Values at risk include:
*viewsheds
*watersheds (we are in the Denver Water shed)
*Century Link and IREA phone, internet and power infrastructure
*Tourism disruption
*Property values

All treatment will be completed by hand by the Wildland Fire Module within the project’s 12 month timeline. Firewood rounds will be either given to the adjacent landowner or collected by LifeBridge (a partner in the project and a Bailey area charity). All slash will be chipped on site and broadcast/spread to a maximum depth of 1” on the adjacent ROW.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/BaileyAreaRoadwayMitigationProject-1.pdf

Month (1) – Mail Project Notices and Work Release Agreements to Adjacent Property Owners. This fulfills MOU requirement with BOCC to notify adjacent property owners. We will also sign work release agreements with property owners for work that extends beyond the ROW.
Month (2) – Meeting with adjacent property owners to discuss project scope and schedule. This will cement public buy-in, answer questions, and clarify expectations.
Month (3) – Begin work.
Month (12) – Complete Work.

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After completing our FAC Self-Assessment we realized that at our current rate of mitigation (~$250K/year), it would take several generations to return our landscape to a pre-settlement, pre-suppression condition. This realization lead to two basic conclusions:

1. Evacuation planning and mitigation had to be our first order of business
2. We would have to move both smarter and faster. We needed a better scientific understanding of fire behavior in our landscape to strategically inform mitigation and a stable and significantly more robust source of funding. Our community would need to self-fund our own mitigation.

This roadway project is a dress rehearsal for self-funding. The initial success of our crowdfunding effort has proven that there is an appetite within the community to self-fund current and future mitigation. The longer-term strategy is to ask the community to support a Fire District mill levy of $500K dedicated to mitigation. The CWPP currently being created for the District will scientifically define and inform the mitigation plan for the community. Given an annual baseline funding of $500K (which we believe can be leverage up to $1-million with grants) will provide the robust source of funding we require.

Adding the AIM grant funding to our crowdsourced funding will reinforce self-fund/grant model in the minds of our community and provide an important stepping stone on the path to a mill levy dedicated to mitigation.

This funding will leverage funding already raised from Fire Adapted Bailey’s Crowdfunding campaign. Given the time and effort required to adapt our homes and landscape to wildfire, our FAC Self-assessment clearly led to the conclusion that a safer evacuation had to be our first order of business. The addition of this funding to our grassroots Crowdfunding campaign will help to accelerate the project timeline and reward our community’s efforts to self-fund our mitigation efforts now and in the future.

This project has broad community support with a deep bench of Partners and Supporters.
Platte Canyon FPD & Wildland Fire Module – Project mitigation planning & execution
Park County Sheriff’s Office – Traffic Control
Park County BOCC – Project MOU with PCFPD and long-term maintenance via Public Works Department
Park County GIS – Project mapping support
Platte Canyon School District – Active support via weekly district newsletter. They consider this project to be a critical school safety issue.
Platte Canyon Chamber of Commerce – Active co-sponsor of fundraising events
Bailey Area Firewise USA Communities – Active in fundraising and project community education & outreach
LifeBridge – Bailey area charity. Will collect firewood rounds not claimed by adjacent property owners
Crowdfunding Sponsors (cash and/or in-kind support in excess of $500):
Girl Scouts of Colorado/Platte River Outfitters/Burland HOA/The Fire When Ready Band/House Call Hearing/Centennial State Insurance/U-Stor-it Affordable Storage/Aspen Peak Cellars/Harris Park Volunteer Group/The Park County Regulators/IREA/Deer Creek Realty/Mad Jacks Brewery/Your Mountain Connection/Front Range Commercial Windows & Doors/River Canyon Gallery/Crow Hill Insurance/Custom Auto Painting

Our crowdfunding campaign has already actively engaged our residents and raised wildfire awareness in our community to new levels. It has proven that there is an appetite within the community to self-fund mitigation efforts. Unlike many mitigation projects, this project will be highly visible to all of our residents as they drive these roadways as part of their daily lives.

The project will set the stage and improve engagement for future Fire Adapted Bailey projects including:

 A PCFPD Mill Levy valued at approximately $500K per year dedicated to Bailey Area strategic mitigation projects scientifically supported by our new district CWPP currently being facilitated by the Forest Stewards Guild. We are essentially planning to fail without a substantial and stable source of funding.
 Rapid assessments and follow-on Property Assessments using the MyWildFireRisk platform

The success and engagement in these future projects will be one measure of success for this project.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/PCFPD-AIM-Ltr.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/PCSO-AIM-Ltr.pdf
Supporting Next Level Engagement, Protection, and Planning for Firewise-Hawaii
Hawaii Wildfire Management Organization
Nani Barretto
65-1279 Kawaihae Rd, Ste 211
Kamuela, HI 96743
808-885-0900
808-209-6204
nani@hawaiiwildfire.org
Yes

Founded in 2000, HWMO was incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in 2002 and is headquartered in the upcountry rural town of Kamuela on Hawaii Island. Since our inception, we have grown from working in West Hawaii to working across the entire state, as well as with partners across the US-affiliated Pacific. Our vision is for the people and places of Hawaii and the Pacific to be wildfire-prepared and wildfire-resilient by serving as a hub of wildfire prevention, mitigation, and planning activities through proactive, collaborative, and forward-thinking projects. We work collaboratively with those living and working in fire-prone areas to reduce fires and maximize protection. We (3 full-time and 2 part-time staff) develop our work plans based on the needs and priorities of our partners across the region who are dealing with wildfire as emergency responders, natural resource managers, and community members.

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Planning

Developing the Firewise (FW) program in Hawaii has been the greatest contributor to community-level action and readiness to date in the state. The overall aim of this project is to support the critical transition of our 15 FW communities (14 are <4 years old) toward the next chapter of sustained activity by providing the training, planning, and project support they need to move beyond their initial efforts into mature and long-term practices. Objectives include: (1) provide strategic training in community/relationship-building, collaborative leadership, and action planning to FW communities to support sustained activity, and (2) provide funds for higher protection-value fuels reduction projects that are stalled because of social and funding capacity limitations. Requested funds will support the planning efforts required to meet objective 1 ($4,000) and the hazard reduction projects in objective 2 ($45,000). The following guiding principles will inform our approach: welcoming and including diverse populations; using collaborative planning processes; experimenting with new approaches to increase resident engagement; and, through technical and financial assistance, enhancing protection via implementing a previously-challenging priority project. These FW groups are at a defining moment as the initial enthusiasm fades. Learning next-step strategies and making significant visible and rewarding hazard reduction progress will aid continued involvement and enthusiasm.

Yes

FW communities in Hawaii are like islands in a sea of invasive fire prone vegetation. Critical to their work, these communities work closely with neighboring large landowners, ranchers, and even government roadside brush abatement activities to mitigate risk in a cohesive multi-partner, multi-approach manner, positively impacting the broader area in which they are situated. We have seen FW communities inspire nearby communities to also take action. For example, we observed a network effect kick in after one particular community became FW-certified; within 4 years, 5 additional neighboring communities became FW-certified, incorporating the landowners and land managers in between for increased protection across the entire area. We now have FW communities in almost every county, similarly impacting beyond the neighborhood boundaries. Working toward long-term approaches within FW communities is critical for long-term protection of broader landscapes and nearby communities.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Wildfire-Risk-Map-150×150.png

The impacts of wildfires in and around FW-Hawaii communities are widespread, including those on human lives and safety, municipal infrastructure, erosion and sedimentation (impacting drinking water quality, nearshore marine waters, coral reefs), air quality, native forests, agriculture and tourism (economy/livelihoods), and cultural resources. These impacts are under-publicized and under addressed. Firewise efforts are not only protecting their own areas, but also helping to raise awareness.

Yes
http://www.hawaiiwildfire.org/cwpps%20AND%20https://bnhm-shiny.berkeley.edu/HWMO/
Yes

Total cost of project is $99,490. HWMO is requesting $49,490 from AIM, or 50% of total budget. The remaining $50,000 will be contributed as in-kind and/or cash matches from Hawaii State Legislature ($5,000 secured) and residents in FW communities ($45,000 in-kind, secured). The allocation of total funds will be: $9,000 to support 225 hours of planning for the FW strategic training, $45,000 to contract services (labor and supplies) to supplement hazard reduction projects at 15 FW sites (up to $3,000 per site), $45,000 to manually remove fuel hazards in and around FW communities, including labor, equipment, and materials, and $490 to cover indirect costs.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/HWMO-AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet.pdf

There are 15 FW-Hawaii sites located across 4 islands, including 9 on Hawaii Island (+1 in the certification process); 3 on Maui; 1 on Oahu; and, 1 on Molokai. The vegetation types surrounding all of these communities are invasive fire-prone grasses, such as guinea, buffel, and fountain grass. These are fine flashy fuels that ignite and spread rapidly, with flame lengths up to 60 feet in areas with year-round winds that exceed 25mph and increasing drought episodes. Hawaii is unique in that these fire-prone non-native fuels have spread and surrounded community areas, unlike the mainland challenge of homes are being built in known fire environments. Over 25% of the state is now covered in this invasive fire prone vegetation, and that number is growing due to abandoned agriculture. This novel fire hazard is literally increasing with each year, and Hawaii’s residents and decision makers are struggling to adjust their understanding of wildfire in Hawaii, let alone keep up with the necessary mitigation and lifestyle adjustments. The increase in wildfire ignitions and large fires unfortunately is taking place in environments that are also not set up well for suppression or evacuation. Communities were designed before wildfires became this severe and frequent, leaving most areas without pressurized water, very little access to wildland areas, single ingress/egress routes per community, and even initial attack responsibilities by county fire departments whose equipment is geared toward structural fires and medical emergencies rather than wildland fires. Several layers of mitigation and capacity building are necessary across the public and government in Hawaii to adequately address wildfire and its impacts to communities and natural resources (water, air, native forests, nearshore marine environments). However, the strongest stop-gap measure we have is supporting community-level preparedness and hazard mitigation. The Firewise program is strongly serving that function.

HWMO staff will lead both the next-level trainings and the planning portions of the project (see section, Scope of Work for Planning Efforts). Through innovative exercise and workshop activities, these efforts will be focused on not only aiding the Firewise groups with planning (immediately for a fuels reduction project and into the future with long-range planning), but it will provide models and strategies for: a) positive person-to-person and group-to-group interactions, b) co-developing plans among diverse voices, c) maximizing protection value of projects. While Firewise committees are the focus, forestry and fire personnel will be involved as appropriate.

No equipment is proposed for purchase. As appropriate for fuels reduction efforts, occasional equipment may be rented (included as part of fuels reduction project costs per community).

Once FW leaders are empowered to organize/lead their communities in taking action, technical/financial assistance will be offered (up to $3000) to those communities that submit a fuels reduction project proposal. Project ideas may include reductions of excessive fuel loads around properties/common areas, roadside/WUI fire fuels, and hazard fuels along private-public borders. The work day(s) will be planned/led by the FW committee, and completed by volunteers in conjunction with the financial/technical assistance that was approved by HWMO (e.g., with a chipper and/or by green waste removal, which has already been proposed as a solution to a key issue and obstacle in most communities). FW committees will be expected to submit a final report.

15 FW leaders will convene for 2 days to be strategically trained in community/relationship-building and collaborative leadership, building skills + supporting the development of healthy, sustainable FW communities. They will also be trained to facilitate the action planning process, which includes a review of hazard assessment results, a generation of project ideas to address the highest hazards, and guidance on methods of vegetation removal, monitoring progress, and documenting results. Funds are being requested to support 90 hours of HWMO planning for this training, including administering/synthesizing results from a FW needs assessment; developing learning objectives; designing/developing training materials; and, coordinating logistics.

Planning for the strategic training (Jan-April 2020) will consist of: administering and synthesizing results from a needs assessment of FW communities; developing learning objectives; designing/identifying training materials; developing/tailoring training materials; and, coordinating logistics. Templates for managing fuels reduction projects (proposals and budgets, work plans, final reports) will also be created prior to, and shared at, the training (April 2020). Once the training is complete (May 2020), FW communities will be eligible to submit a proposal and budget for a fuels reduction project (May-July 2020) (heart of fire season where interest and motivation to act may be highest). All FW projects must be completed and reports submitted to HWMO by November 2020. Surveys will be administered to FW members at the start and following each activity (strategic training, fuels reduction project) to assess engagement/participation levels, challenges, and strengths.

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HWMO strives for FW communities to feel motivated, empowered, and equipped to create and implement action plans for creating broader collaborative landscape risk reduction efforts within and between communities and public areas. Their ability to do this work is highly contingent on their ability to work together as a community. Neighborhood well-being and social cohesion is at the heart of an active FW community. The proposed strategic training of FW leaders, and the subsequent provision of funds for fuels reduction projects, will help us move FW communities to this next level of sustained motivation, empowerment, and action. Implementing a fuels project that is beyond their typical capacity, achieves more protection than they could have done alone, and draws in more neighbors and keeps the motivation high for the project’s duration and far beyond. For this reason, the proposed fuels reduction projects will serve both long-term social and immediate hazard reduction goals. This increased excitement and engagement dovetails well with FW projects we already have funded by FAC Net and a State Legislature grant. These complementary funds will be supporting FW webinars, newsletters, online sharing, and attendance at an upcoming Hawaii Wildfire conference for FW leaders. These other projects will have much more relevance and participation if the FW groups are concurrently undergoing the planning and fuels management work proposed via this application.

Federal funding is already in place to support travel expenses for interested FW members who participate in/attend the Hawaii Wildfire Summit in May 2020, which will serve as leverage for the proposed project where 15 FW leaders across 4 islands will convene on one island for the strategic training. In addition to this training, the availability of funds (up to $3,000) for each FW community will serve as a significant motivator for FW committees to increase participation in action planning and in completing a fuels reduction project as a community. In addition, state and federal funds are in place for us to develop and promote opportunities for learning exchanges amongst FW-Hawaii communities, using webinars, newsletters, and workshops (at the Summit) for sharing lessons learned and success stories. All these activities, together, will support a bigger impact on the ground and promote more active participation by FW communities compared to any one activity alone.

AC Net, via Watershed Research and Training Center, has provided funding to support: the development and promotion of peer learning exchange opportunities for FW-Hawaii communities; and, the travel expenses for 10 FW members to participate in the strategic training as part of their attendance at the Hawaii Wildfire Summit in May 2020. As a core member of FAC Net, we also receive various amounts of their staff support, and access to resources and tools to assist us with this project. In addition to about $5,000 from a US Forest Service grant, Hawaii State Legislature has contributed $5,000 to support the planning of the Summit. And finally, residents in all FW communities (~4,096 dwellings across 15 FW communities) will also participate in the cost share program to provide time, labor, and equipment for completing hazard reduction activities. Additional partners and their involvement will include:
– County Fire Departments: technical and area expertise;
– State Forestry and Wildlife: technical and area expertise, involvement in long-range planning, signatory for FW re-certification applications;
– Fed Fire, Army Fire and Emergency Services, National Park Fire Management, US Fish and Wildlife Service: technical expertise, project planning in consideration of their fuels management for regional cohesion of mitigation activities; and,
– Ranchers and land managers: coordination of inside neighborhood boundaries and wildland-located fire mitigation activities

Short- and long-term term success will be determined by qualitative (informal discussions and focus groups, and observations) and quantitative (survey) methods. Monitoring of short-term progress will be done on an on-going basis by tracking participation numbers (date of meeting, # attendees), volunteerism (date of work day, # participants), levels of engagement and commitment, challenges and successes (both at HWMO-organizational and FW-community levels), and fuels reduction outcomes (project details, dates of work days, # hours contributed, area/amount of hazard fuel removed, and before/after pictures). Longer-term success will be measured on an annual basis (via web-based surveys and focus groups) by assessing levels of sustained participation in FW communities and their frequency and scope of mitigation activities (e.g., amount of slash chipped) over time.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/HWMO-HFD-LOS-AIM-Round-3.PDF-1.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/HWMO-DOFAW-LOS-AIM-Round-3-1.pdf
Exansion of creation of defensible space program in South Deschutes County, Oregon
Upper Deschutes River Coalition 501 C3
Jerry Hubbard
PO Box 3042
Sunriver
541 390 9798
541 390 9798
jerryhubbard1943@gmail.com
Yes

Organization
The Upper Deschutes River Communities (UDRC) is a grassroots non-profit organization created in 2004 to enable 28 neighborhoods within the Upper Deschutes River watershed to act collectively on natural resource challenges. The neighborhoods and 6,000 plus lot owners are located near and along the Wild and Scenic Deschutes River, in the thick of a ponderosa pine and lodge pole forest from Sunriver south to Wickiup Reservoir in the southern part of Deschutes County, Oregon.

In December 2018 the Board of Directors approved rebranding with as the Upper Deschutes River Communities while keeping the legal name of the Upper Deschutes River Coalition. The new name better reflects our goals of outreach and communication to communities in our service area.

Mission

To protect the Upper Deschutes River communities by supporting fire adapted communities, pure and abundant river flows and wildlife habitat.

Fuels Reduction

Home owners who are capable of hiring and managing contractors can apply on line at the UDRC’s web site. Upon approval, the home owner hires a contractor to create a defensible space, pays the contractor and applies for reimbursement. The UDRC will pay the home owner 100% up to $500.

AIM’s support of our fuel reduction work will reduce the risk of wildfires. A fire in communities surrounded by forests could have a major negative impact on residents living in South Deschutes County including seniors and low-income families.

South Deschutes County communities are rated high or extreme risk for wildfires. 80% of Oregon forests are rated at moderate or high risk of severe fire. Improving the safety and security of our communities reduces the risks to fire fighters and first responders.

Yes

South Deschutes County communities are rated high or extreme risk for wildfires. 80% of Oregon forests are rated at moderate or high risk of severe fire. Improving the safety and security of our communities reduces the risks to fire fighters and first responders.

The number of people in the U.S. older than 65 is growing rapidly: it’s about 15% today, and is expected to grow to 1 in 4 residents – 98.2 million people by 2060. Deschutes County experienced some of the state’s fastest growth in its over-65 population between 2010 and 2016: about 28 percent, according to Portland State University’s Population Research Center.

Statistics in Deschutes County for seniors and low income citizens are:
o Poverty rate for all ages is about 16%
o Poverty rate for ages 5-17 is about 18%
o Number in poverty is 23,298 or 13.4% of County population (173,997) compared to US at 12.7%
o Poverty in the US is 12.7%
o Poverty thresholds is 2 adults with 2 kids is $24,339
o Deschutes County has 14,027 vets

Yes

• People and Place – Deschutes County has 181,307 citizens

The people served by the UDRC include:
o 6,959 permanent residents and over 50,000 temporary visitors (sportsmen & vacationers)
o 91% Caucasian, 6% Spanish, 2% Native American, 1% Other
o 53 Median Age
o Median Per capita income 2011-2015 $29,518
o Deschutes County households 66,237
o Persons per household 2.49

Yes
https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/FirePreventionDocuments/UDR%20CWPP%20Final%20FULL.pdf
Yes

An AIM grant of $5,000 will be matched by our MCM Fund match of $5,000 due in Jan. 2020. Home owners will contribute $125 per lot (25%) of the $500 reimbursement. $4,458 AIM funds will be used for reimbursement, $442 for UDRC mileage. In kind consists of UDRC labor at $25 hour at 68 hours to visit 17 homes. The in kind match also include home owners work at $25 hour at 6 hours per lot times 17 lots totaling $2,550. The cash match involves owners spending $125 per lot or $2,125. MCM funds of $5,000 are reimbursements.

Total budget is $16,375.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-3.pdf

The majority of our private properties remain at high risk from the threat of wildfires. Reducing the threat of wild fires by education and through proven methods of fuels reduction with private and public funding remains our primary goal. Many residents have voluntarily completed their own fuel reduction process and are now certified through Oregon Dept. of Forestry as being ‘fire safe’.

Large fires have endangered the Greater La Pine area since 2000. The following fires have threatened residents and prompted evacuations with multiple neighborhoods and La Pine State Park:
2019 Bridge Road Fire 12 acres
2013 Burgess Road at 168 acres
2005 Park fire at 139 acres
2003Davis Lake fire at 21,181 acres

Within the La Pine Community Wildfire Protection plan there are three neighborhoods rated at the highest fire risk priority (Day Road Corridor, 6th & Dorrance and Finely Butte).

AIM’s support of our fuel reduction work for home owners, low income families and seniors will reduce the chance of wildfires will make our communities fire resistant.

na

na

Home owners who are capable of hiring and managing contractors, can apply on line at the UDRC’s web site. Upon approval, the home owner hires a contractor to create a defensible space, pays the contractor and applies for reimbursement. The UDRC will pay the home owner 100% up to $500.

This program is very popular with residents and expanding the program to the La Pine CWPP will reduce the threat of wildfires.

The UDRC’s time commitment for volunteers is minimal. AIM’s grant of $5,000 with be matched by a cash grant from the MCM Fund of $5,000 (due Jan. 2020).

The budget totals $16, 375 of cash and in kind contributions.

The Coalition from 2005 to 2014 reduced fuel loads on 162 private lots (117 acres). In 2016, 12 lots on eight acres. At the Fall River community we did 12 one acre lots. In 2017, we completed seven lots on four acres. In 2019, we have approved 28 home owner’s reimbursements of $14,185 Home owners have spent $35, 197. The La Pine Rural Fire District supports our efforts by sending letters to home owners of high risk properties. This has proven effective in getting owners to apply for funds.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/BNSF-map-1.pdf

Spring of 2020 to Fall of 2021.

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The project includes land within the UDRC CWPP and the La Pine CWPP, both are in South Deschutes County, Oregon. To date the UDRC has used its grant funds within the UDRC’s CWPP. Our Senior defensible space program includes both CWPPs. This program allows the UDRC to spend $1,000 to create defensible spaces on property owned by residents 60+ with household incomes under $38,000. The UDRC has funds to complete defensible space work on up to 144 homes.

The program that reimburses home owners 100% up to $500 has been very success. To date, the UDRC has spent or committed $14,185 and owners have spent $35,197 on defensible space within the UDRC’s CWPP.

To expand our defensible space home owner reimbursement program that provides up to $500 to property owners who create defensible spaces.

The UDRC achieves its mission by utilizing its extensive volunteer base and partners to accomplish many environmental benefit projects including environmental education programs for children and families, public & private forest fuel reduction projects and Community Fire Protection Planning; watershed health; and compliance with the Oregon Forestland – Urban Interface Fire Protection Act (Senate Bill 360). Through the Coalition’s strategic planning process, we identified significant restoration and educational needs in the Upper Deschutes River area, which this grant request will address.

Programs and Services

Regional organizations we work with include:
o USFS Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District Deschutes National Forest
o Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
o Deschutes River Conservancy
o Upper Deschutes Watershed Council
o Oregon Department of Forestry
o Deschutes County
o Sunriver Chamber of Commerce
o Bureau of Land Management
o NRCS
o Deschutes Natural Collaborative Forest
o Deschutes Collaborative Forest Project
o Project Wildfire
o Wildland Fire Cohesive Strategy
o La Pine Fire District
o Coalition for the Deschutes

The number of home owners who are approved for the $500 program and the number who complete the program. The total amount home owners spend vs. the $500 provided.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/UDRC-Support-Letter-AIM-Grant.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Coalitions-and-Collaboratives-AIM-La-Pine-Fire-UDRC-Support.pdf
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/home-owners-will-hire-and-manage-contractors.docxLake County Fire Resilience Project
Clear Lake Environmental Research Center, 501c3
Will Evans
PO Box 636
Lakeport, CA 95453
7072950333
6784258970
will.evans@clerc.co
Yes

The Clear Lake Environmental Research Center (CLERC) is an environmental nonprofit (501c3) organization primarily serving Lake County, California. CLERC was formed in 2014 and is at a tipping point of capacity and uniquely positioned to catalyze the much-needed landscape scale forest and fire planning and implementation needed in Lake County. CLERC’s primary programs are an accredited water quality lab and a county-wide regional forest health and fire resilience program. Both programs are in their infancy and being developed simultaneously as a way to share and reduce overhead costs. CLERC just hired their first employee on 10/5/19 in order to implement a Regional Forest and Fire Capacity (RFFC) building contract with the Watershed Research and Training Center (WRTC). CLERC has already secured strong partnerships with CAL FIRE, the Lake County RCD, and local Fire Safe Councils who have formally expressed their support for CLERC taking on this leadership role in Lake County.

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Equipment Purchase

One of the primary goals of the RFFC program is to increase Lake County’s access to California’s Climate Investment (CCI) funding. Currently, two CCI grants have been issued to Lake County, but both were for small or single-owner projects. CLERC is currently the grant manager of the single-owner project and is coordinating with the Siegler Springs Redevelopment Association (SSRDA), who is managing the other CCI grant. CLERC and SSRDA are proposing to utilize the AIM funds to achieve greater and longer-term results with the current CCI funding that we already have in addition to obtaining new CCI funding that is leveraged across a much larger project area with more landowners involved. The long-term goal is to increase the amount of land within Lake County being actively managed for carbon sequestration and wildfire resilience purposes alike. Specific objectives include:
1. Continue making strategic investments in CLERC and SSRDA’s organizational capacity.
2. Conduct planning and preparation work necessary for large, landscape-scale forest health and fire resiliency projects.
3. Work with outside experts to explore and vet opportunities for increasing the use of prescribed fire in Lake County.
4. Research and pursue various funding methods for ongoing forest health and fire resilience project implementation.

Yes

The project will positively impact Lake County as a whole because of the partnerships established with property owners, County, BLM, USFS who all have fire resilience as the common goal. Property owners will observe on their own land, their neighbors land, or in other communities, land-management activities being performed producing fire resilience. This will lead to a greater pool of people wanting to do the same. We will offer demonstration/training events for prescribed fire so that this tool will become more acceptable to the county at large. The planned activities such as shaded fuel breaks on high priority roads used by communities for ingress and egress, provide cross ownership benefits. The mosaic pattern of fire resilience will fill in over time. Even one property owner benefiting from grant funds to produce fire resilience will have a positive effect on the community at large by slowing down a fire, reducing flame length and stopping the movement of a canopy fire.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Maps-FHSZ-150×150.jpg

Assets and values in Lake County in need of fire protection include life and safety, structures, water and watershed values, agriculture, rangeland, recreation, air quality, soil resources, wildlife, unique scenic areas, cultural and historic resources. Among the county’s assets at risk is the largest geothermal power installation in the world. Rebuilding from recent wildfires is occurring in the population centers of Lake County and is characterized by a wildland urban interface fire problem.

Yes
http://www.lakecountyca.gov/Government/Boards/lcfsc/LCCWPP.htm
Yes

Cash match funding for this project has already been secured. CLERC is currently under contract as a subawardee with the Watershed Research and Training Center (WRTC), a 501c3 nonprofit based in Hayfork, California, for fire resiliency capacity building. The program is funded by the State of California through the Regional Forest and Fire Capacity (RFFC) Program. This project is being implemented in phases. CLERC is currently under contract for Phase 1 (Oct-Dec 2019) and Phase 2 will provide the match for the AIM project. SSRDA has secured cash match funding through their California Climate Investments (CCI) Fire Prevention Grant for the remainder of the required cash match. All of this cash match funding is provided by CCI funds.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/CLERC-AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable.pdf

The Project area is Lake County in northern California that has had 68% of its land area burned by extreme wildfires in since 2015. It is one of the most biodiverse counties in the western US encompassing grasslands, chaparral, oak savannah, mixed conifer/hardwood forest, conifer forest, varying in elevation from 1,340 ft up to 7,000 ft. It covers a large percentage of the Mendocino National Forest and the Berryessa-Snow Mountain National Monument. The fuel types are burned standing and downed trees. The burned area that has had four years of regrowth in a decadent manner is now in a state of extreme fire risk due to the continuity and density of the fuel load. Dead trees (from drought and pest damage) in the forest cause wildfires to burn extremely hot causing hydrophobicity to forest soils. The forest that has not yet burned in decades due to fire suppression, is wildlife impassable with a huge understory fuel load providing continuous ladder fuel. The entire county has a Tier 2 high hazard rating. The project targets forestlands with an extreme level of tree mortality due to the wildfires, and the unburned forest with an increasing percentage of dead trees as a result of drought stress and pest kill. The project will take place at the edge of vulnerable communities in the wildland urban interface. The National Fire Plan identifies 17 communities in Lake County at risk from wildfire most of which have burned. All communities have been affected by wildfires, through evacuation, smoke inhalation, agricultural loss, residence and business loss. Many millions of dollars have been spent to rebuild not only homes but also businesses and service water infrastructure that is still located in a WUI that is at a high fire risk. Another unique asset to the area is the Geysers steam-field. It provides the heat source to the world’s largest producing geothermal power facility generating 5 million megawatt hours of power and is a major employer in the county.

A total of four positions will be partially funded with AIM funds; two at CLERC and two at SSRDA. At CLERC, the ED and Program Coordinator will spend a collective of 250 hours on planning, organizing and pursuing funding for large landscape –scale forest health and fire resiliency projects. At SSRDA, the ED and Firewise Communities Program Assistant will spend time helping facilitate contact with landowners and expedite the process for getting the Fire Prevention Grant funds spent. SSRA, through collaboration with CLERC, will help export best practices and successful strategies from this effort to other communities throughout Lake County.

The equipment requested as part of this proposal includes two computers, two GIS mapping software licenses, and a plotter. Currently, both CLERC and SSRDA are using volunteers’ personal laptop computers for planning, managing and tracking projects. AIM funds will allow these two organizations to provide robust computers capable of running the required GIS software. The budget also includes funding for two GIS software license (purchased at a discounted rate for nonprofit organizations) for use by CLERC staff for project planning and tracking. The plotter will be used to print maps for use in the field while discussing projects with landowners. There are no local print shops available for this purpose.

AIM funding is not proposed to be used directly for fuel reduction, but it will be used to help plan, organize, implement, and expedite fuel reduction projects. AIM funding will also be used to organize community-wide funding applications for large, landscape-scale fuel reduction projects.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/2015-2018-Fire-Map.pdf

Overall the Lake County Fire Resilience Project is being implemented over the course of 32 months. However, AIM funds will be spent during one year, which will begin in December 2019 and end in December 2020. Due to the short time-frame for the project, all deliverables will be completed concurrently. Deliverables marking completion will include:
1. Completed community-wide grant funding applications for on-the-ground fuel reduction work.
2. Conduct outreach to key landowners in Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) areas for inclusion in community-wide fuel reduction planning and implementation projects.
3. Host a public meeting to solicit input from interested community members and project partners.
4. Research and pursue additional funding sources for community-wide forest health and fire resiliency projects.
5. Network with other regions and communities to learn best practices for increasing the amount of land under active management.
6. Advance the use of prescribed fire in Lake County.

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The Lake County Forest Health and Fire Resiliency Project in a large-scale planning and capacity building effort in order to make the community more resilient. The project, once completed, will place Lake County in a position to continue planning and implementation projects utilizing CCI funding without substantial support from outside grants. Currently CLERC is receiving guidance towards this goal from the WRTC and looks forward to receiving this type of support from Coalitions and Collboratives if successful with this application for AIM funding. The SSRDA is seeing the limitations of receiving CCI implementation funding without enough organizational captivity to spend the funding at the fast pace needed to handle the fuel that has built up and continues to do so. The AIM funding will help both CLERC and SSRDA be much more effective in achieving the fire resiliency goals of Lake County. This team has laid the roots on long lasting partnerships with both public and private entities. This list includes the USFS, BLM, CAL FIRE, the Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians, Robinson Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians, local fire departments, local Fire Safe Councils, and over 40 landowners covering over 10,000 acres of private ownership. AIM funding will further the collaboration between all of these entities.

Since CLERC and SSRDA are new organizations implementing a new fire-resiliency program, the organizations rely heavily on volunteer labor and donated equipment. While we have secured some initial seed money for this effort, the AIM funding would allow us to become truly a professional organization serving the community on this project. With current funding we are able to fund an Executive Director for about 20 hours a week, but our planning efforts require nearly a full time commitment from two people. The AIM funding would allow us to fully fund the Executive Director position and fund a project manager on a part-time basis as well as procure much needed equipment that CLERC currently doesn’t own. All of our GIS mapping is being conducted on the personal laptops of volunteers and the community-wide planning efforts are taxing this PC and resulting in GIS working taking substantially longer than it would with a more robust computer.

This project is being implemented by an interdisciplinary network of organizations and individuals that CLERC has been assembling over the course of Phase 1 of the RFFC program. This team includes: The United States Forest Service (Mendocino National Forest), The Bureau of Land Management, The Berryessa-Snow Mountain National Monument, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE), Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians, Robinson Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians, Lake County Fire Safe Council, South Lake Fire Safe Council, Siegler Springs Redevelopment Association, the Lake County Resource Conservation District (RCD), New Paradigm College, multiple Firewise Communities across the county, and over 40 private landowners covering over 10,000 acres of private ownership. Each of these players has a different role in community-wide fire resiliency. The primary purpose of everyone working together is to accomplish more than any individual or individual organization would be capable of achieving alone. By working together on large landscape-scale projects we greatly increase our competitiveness for California cap-and-trade grant dollars and we are making the funding available to landowners who wouldn’t otherwise be able to access the funds on their own due to lack of technical and managerial expertise and also the fact that very few single private landowners in Lake County have a large enough holdings to create a project large enough to be considered “landscape-scale”.

The project has several clear measures of success both in the short run and the long run. In the short run, success will be measured by the number of coordinated funding applications submitted in addition to the number of individuals and entities that are participants in our network. During the term of the AIM grant, our goal is to submit at least one community-wide grant application, similar to the community-wide Forest Health Grant currently in progress. In the long run success will be measures by the total number of acres of land under active management. Long run success will also be measured by the severity of future wildfires. CLERC has begun tracking the number of acres managed in the County using GIS computer mapping software. This GIS database is also used for tracking the planning process of future projects.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/LNU-Letter-of-Support.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Lake-RCD-LOS-CLERC-RFFC-Program.pdf
Ritter Land Management Team FireWise Community Project
Ritter Land Management Team 501c3
Bob Parker
POB 264
Long Creek, OR. 97856
541-403-0480
5414030480
bob.parker@oregonstate.edu
Yes

Ritter Land Management Team (RLMT) is a collaborative of private landowners in the Ritter, Oregon area within the Lower Middle Fork John Day River subbasin. RLMT was initially formed in 2103, became a 501c3 organization in 2016, and in 2017 achieved status as a Firewise community. RLMT has a Board of Directors and employs an executive director. The RLMT vision is to achieve land restoration across all ownerships, public and private, at the landscape scale, an “all hands, all lands” approach. RLMT works with multiple entities to provide financial support for organizational capacity and on the ground restoration projects. In 2017 RLMT created Ritter Juniper Products (RJP) for harvesting and milling timber, primarily juniper, as a means of removing juniper from the landscape for forest health restoration in the Ritter area. A portable sawmill and a ‘Telehandler’ machine for handling logs were purchased in 2017 with financial support from Business Oregon.

Personnel Capacity, Equipment Purchase

This project will help RLMT achieve its vision for watershed scale land restoration which provides multiple benefits, including improved fish and wildlife habitat, more sustainable grazing and agriculture, a more sustainable community, and a reduced risk of loss to natural resources, livestock, people and structures resulting from wildfire.
Our specific objectives include utilizing RLMT personnel to develop and conduct a vigorous education and outreach campaign to increase landowner membership and participation in the RLMT collaborative and the Ritter FireWise Community. RLMT personnel will also help plan, coordinate and oversee on the grounds restoration and fire risk reduction projects. Acquisition of the additional equipment will facilitate RLMT progress with juniper removal within the 105,000 acre collaborative boundary by expanding our harvesting and hauling capacity as qualified contract loggers are typically not available, limiting the capacity for restoration work. The Ritter area is a focused investment area for Natural Resource Conservation Services (NRCS) in Grant County and beginning in 2020 substantial grant funding for juniper removal will become available through NRCS. Utilizing those funds to create the highest beneficial impact on the ground will be significantly improved with an increased harvesting capacity, enabling RLMT to effectively treat more acres per year.

Yes

Juniper encroachment is recognized by landowners, natural resource management agencies and fire-fighting organizations as one of the leading risks to the health and sustainability of watersheds and communities throughout central and eastern Oregon. It is estimated that in the last 130 years, juniper increased from a few hundred thousand acres to over nine million acres across eastern and central Oregon. RLMT works with all the members of the collaborative to reduce juniper, which is highly incendiary and this project will help us to lessen the threat of fire to RLMT members and all other landowners within our watershed boundaries. Juniper also causes problems with water availability, erosion and loss of grazing vegetation, so this project will also help to restore the natural balance of plant communities within the project boundaries, benefitting all landowners.

Yes

The rapid expansion of juniper has created substantial damage to all aspects of watershed health and sustainability including stream flow quantity and quality, soil erosion, grasses and shrub imbalance, wildlife habitat, grazing potential and destructive wildfires. This project will greatly increase RLMT capacity to plan, organize and conduct effective juniper management treatments which are essential for restoring and maintaining the health and sustainability of watersheds and communities.

Yes
http://www.grantcountycwpp.com/
Yes

$18,000 will be used for capacity building by supporting RLMT personnel who will organize outreach efforts as well as plan, organize, and manage all aspects of the juniper control project. RLMT will 100% match the AIM funds with existing funds provided through the Meyer Memorial Trust. $18,000 will be used for the purchase of a self-loading log truck which will be 100% matched with funds from RLMT landowners. RLMT and the Ritter Juniper Project will be the sole participants in this project. RLMT will be able to leverage the AIM grant funds as we are aggressively pursuing grant funding from sources such as the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board and the Natural Resources Conservation Service who place a high value on a broad funding base.

Ritter, which encompasses approximately 105,000 acres of private land distributed across about 75 landowners, lies between the Middle and North Forks of the John Day rivers (both of which have a wild and scenic designation). Ritter is in an extremely remote unincorporated area in Grant County, Oregon which has an average population density of less than 2 people per square mile. Ritter residents have over an hour to two hours commute to the closest population centers (John Day, Pendleton and La Grande) so resources of all kinds are not readily available, including wildland and structural fire protection. Communications are also limited and many people rely on phone land lines as cell phone coverage is limited or non-existent in many parts of Ritter. This area is highly biodiverse, with 6 distinct forest types (Ponderosa pine, lodgepole pine, warm mixed conifer, cool mixed conifer, aspen and juniper) as well as open grasslands and rocky outcrops. Juniper encroachment is a severe problem threatening many resource values and treatment is difficult and expensive. Juniper influenced areas have high fuel loads and juniper is a highly incendiary fuel. Ritter’s remoteness, lack of resources and high fire risk posed by juniper make its removal a very high priority.

Currently only about 30 of the landowners are members of RLMT and the Ritter Firewise Community. The capacity building funds would be used to conduct outreach efforts designed to encourage additional landowners in the area to join and actively participate with the collaborative and the FireWise Community. These funds will also to help provide RLMT with the internal capacity to plan, conduct and supervise the on the ground juniper removal and other projects designed to meet the needs of the collaborative. We currently have capacity funding from Meyer Memorial Trust but those funds have a limited timeline and these additional funds would help maintain the personnel needed to accomplish the additional work to be done.

Ritter Juniper Products (RJP) is a wholly owned company created by RLMT. This project will enable RJP to offer a complete juniper management service including logging and hauling juniper logs to the mill. RJP then manufacturers the juniper into lumber which is sold to provide funding for the labor needed to help restore the landscape and reduce the risk of fire. RJP currently does not have the capacity to load and haul logs to the mill in a timely and efficient manner and is therefore reliant on outside contractors who are often not available. This limitation significantly reduces our ability to manage juniper. With a self-loading log truck we would be able cover more acres per year and reduce the fire risk accordingly.

N/A

N/A

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Project-Overview-Map-36×48-NO-LANDOWNER-LABLES-1.pdf

This project will be an important contribution to the RLMT ongoing efforts to restore watersheds through juniper removal and other projects. A key milestone and outcome defining successful project completion will be a significant increase in landowner membership in and participation with RLMT and the Ritter FireWise community. This outcome will be accomplished through a series of landowner outreach efforts beginning with informational letters and brochures and lead to the development of educational products and engaging workshops, tours, and community discussions.
The other key milestone will be the immediate acquisition of a self-loading log truck and other equipment needed to provide RJP with the capacity to log, load, haul and mill juniper logs for manufacturing juniper lumber products. The milestones indicating the program is successful will be the number of landowners served, the number of acres treated, and the volume and sales value of juniper lumber products produced.

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The key strategic value for this project will be enhancing RLMT ability to accomplish land restoration at the landscape scale, which necessitates an “all hands, all lands” approach. One of the greatest challenges and opportunities is to motivate private landowners in the Ritter area to join and participate with RLMT and our FireWise community and diligently work to improve watershed conditions on their properties and minimize their risks from the threat of destructive wildfire. A part of this process will be the strategic value of increasing the vigor and sustainability of the RLMT and RJP organizations themselves which are essential for providing the leadership and organizing capacity needed for linking together the highly diverse landowners to create a dynamic and successful collaborative.
Developing a successful organization is contingent in part on obtaining the funding needed to maintain the organization and its capacity to accomplish the goals and objectives defined by the members. This project will play an important strategic role in enabling RLMT to leverage its track record of success for obtaining additional capacity and project funding in the future.
Finally, a strategic goal for this project is protecting the health and sustainability of the Ritter community which is dependent on maintaining and improving the productivity of the land for economic viability as well as all natural resources.

The RLMT vision for true landscape scale restoration is an ambitious undertaking and as others have noted, “Vision without action is merely a dream…” This project funding will dovetail together with our other funding sources to provide the capacity to create and maintain an energetic, motivated and effective collaborative of landowners who want to practice good stewardship. It takes significant funding to build and run an organization, which is needed to successfully compete for the grant funding needed to accomplish our restoration goals. Properties in Ritter often include several ecosystems, which means complicated management considerations and minimal income. Juniper removal, like riparian restoration, weed control, conifer management and the many other restoration projects RLMT needs to implement, is a difficult and expensive action and a top priority within the collaborative. This funding will help stabilize RLMT and will help expand the number of acres treated per year.

RLMT was created because collaboration is essential. Joining together to combine their knowledge, skills and efforts greatly increases RLMT capacity to do the hard work needed to sustain a way of life that faces numerous challenges and obstacles. Accomplishing our vision also requires close collaboration and partnership with the many entities that can provide the technical expertise and funding essential to identify, prioritize, plan, conduct and monitor the wide range of restoration projects that has been and continue to be required to achieve healthy and sustainable landscapes. Our partners include the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, Grant Soil and Water Conservation District and the Monument Soil and Water Conservation District, all of whom have contributed on the ground technical expertise, grant writing assistance, and GIS analysis, and have indicated their willingness to assist with this project. Another partner includes the Natural Resource Conservation Service who will also provide technical expertise. Beginning in 2020 NRCS will be offering substantial grant funding opportunities for juniper control in the Ritter area through its focused investment program in Grant County. The Oregon Department of Forestry will contribute to FireWise and wildland fire control needs. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs may also contribute through sharing data, knowledge and technical expertise.

Several metrics will be utilized to assess the success of this project. An increase in the number of Ritter area landowners who join and participate with RLMT, RJP and the Ritter FireWise Community can be readily measured and tracked. As those numbers increase, reporting that success back to the community may well encourage and motivate still more landowners to join. The attendance at our outreach programs, such as meetings and workshops will also indicate whether the program is enjoying success and conversations with landowners at those meetings may provide useful insights into people’s thinking, what they are interested in and what they hope to gain from our activities.
Another very valuable measure of the success of this project will be the improvement to the land and the community through the number of acres treated, the residual fuel loading/fire risk left on the ground and the volume of juniper logs delivered to the RJP sawmill.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Ritter-FireWise-Grant-Forest-Service-Support-Letter.pdf
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Letter-of-Support-Ritter-Ted-Williams.pdfThompson Peak Initiative
Lassen County Fire Safe Council, Inc. is a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation
Thomas Esgate
P.O.Box 816
Susanville, CA 96130
530-251-5560
530-310-0146
tom.esgate@gmail.com
Yes

Lassen County Fire Safe Council, Inc. (LCFSC) is a 501 (c)(3) Non-Profit that was established in 2002. It serves all of Lassen County, California and parts of Modoc, Plumas and Shasta Counties as well. LCFSC conducts forest and watershed restoration projects that help protect communities and their residents. To date LCFSC has treated and restored over 50,000 acres. LCFSC also provides educational programs and Firewise Communities support to help residents take responsibility for the actions they can take to reduce wildfire risk.

Planning

Lassen County Fire Safe Council (LSFSC) is requesting planning funding for surveys, project design, and resource assessments necessary to obtain environmental regulatory clearance prior to forest thinning treatments on private lands within the Thompson Peak Initiative (TPI) project area. Completing this work will meet the objective of having project-ready private lands to treat when funding for hazardous fuels removal is obtained. The TPI area is the highest priority in Lassen County Community Wildfire Protection Plan due to high hazardous fuel loads and unique meteorological aspects that cause wildfires, when they occur, to travel rapidly down the mountains toward the communities located at lower elevations.
The objective of the overall TPI is to implement forest thinning and restoration treatments on a mix of public and private lands within a greater than 20,000-acre area of Wildland Urban Interface in and adjacent to the communities of Janesville and Milford, California. The goals of this work are to: reduce hazardous fuel loads; reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire; improve public safety; improve forest health by removing insect and disease affected trees; improve forest adaptability to climate change; improve and enhance watershed services and functions; protect habitat on the landscape; improve local socioeconomic conditions by employing local contractors and sustaining local biomass generation facilities; and protect working forest and agricultural landscapes.

Yes

The TPI project area is a mix of public and private land with the US Forest Service occupying the upper reaches of the mountain and private and BLM lands located from mid-slope to the lower reaches. The LCFSC CWPP working group reached a unanimous consensus that it is critical that both the public and private land be treated concurrently in order to achieve the optimum in watershed restoration benefits and community protection from wildfire. The TPI area has a long history of large wildfires that have threatened the communities of Janesville and Milford; the most recent being the 56,000 acres Walker Fire in 2019 that forced evacuations. There are still thousands of acres of hazardous fuel loads that pose an extreme wildfire risk to these communities. The project’s geographical location allows wildfire to travel quickly downhill; therefore, clearing the way for projects to proceed in Janesville and Milford will also benefit communities to the east in the project’s area of influence.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/TPI-COCO-AIM-Map-2-LassenCoFireHazSeverityMapwithProjectArea.pdf

Values at risk are the TPI communities and their associated 1,000+ habitable structures and other infrastructure, the headwaters for watercourses important to local communities for irrigation and potable water, and sensitive species habitat. The TPI area is the highest priority in Lassen County CWPP due to high hazardous fuel loads and unique meteorological aspects that cause wildfires, when they occur, to travel rapidly down the mountains toward the communities located at lower elevations.

Yes

Yes

Our project consists of the planning, landowner sign-ups and environmental clearance efforts to get the project ready for $3,000,000 in implementation funding that we are currently seeking from the State of California. $10,000 of in-kind match comes from community residents that are participating, and will continue to participate, in our planning and landowner sign-up activities. Our $40,000 Contractual cash match comes from a capacity grant from Sierra Nevada Conservancy. The Contractual activities that will be funded from the grant and cash match will pay for specialists that conduct the necessary resource surveys and assessments to gain clearance for our project’s implementation, e.g. archaeological, botanical, wildlife, soil, etc.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/TPI-COCO-AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable.pdf

The TPI project area is located in northeastern California southeast of the city of Susanville and encompasses a section of the Diamond Mountains extending from south of the Susanville Municipal Airport southeast to the town of Milford. The majority of the project area is in Lassen County with a portion extending into Plumas County along the southwest boundary; the area extends from Township (T) 29 North (N), Range (R) 13 East (E), Section 31 in the north in a southwest direction to T26N R15E section 7 of the Mount Diablo Meridian (Map 1).

The project area is a mix of private and public land. USDA Forest Service lands occupy the upper reaches of the mountains; private and BLM lands are located from mid-slope to the lower reaches. Forest stands within the TPI area are overstocked and comprised of red fir with scattered western white pine at upper elevation sites that retain more snow; Jeffrey pine and white fir on drier upper elevation sites; and Sierra mixed conifer stands (ponderosa, Jeffrey, and sugar pine, white fir, Douglas-fir, and incense cedar) at mid and lower elevations. At the base of the mountains, ponderosa and Jeffrey pine and California black oak occur.

The entire project area lies within a wildland urban interface zone (WUI) and includes the towns of Janesville and Milford, and over 1,000 homes and other infrastructure. Although these communities are located at the base of the Diamond Mountains they are at great risk from wildfire as past fire behavior has shown, that in this area, fires move down the mountain rather than up because of afternoon downdrafts that travel downslope and out into the Great Basin. Nearly all of the project area of influence (Map 2) to the west of U.S. Route 395, i.e., the area where future hazardous fuels treatments will occur, is in a CalFire Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zone. TPI forest land provides sensitive species habitat and makes up the headwaters for multiple watercourses important to local communities.

The work product of our project will serve not only as a Community Assessment, but as the clearance document for our project’s implementation. LCFSC’s Project Manager, a Certified Conservation Planner will take the lead role and will be supported by a contracted ecologist, Registered Professional Forester, botanist, and an archaeologist. We have conducted numerous similar efforts. Most recently our Diamond Mountain Initiative has acquired over $8,000,000 in implementation funding. The funding obtained is allowing the partnership to pay for & implement the targeted fuel treatments/mitigation efforts.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/TPI-COCO-AIM-Map-1-Project-Area-of-Influence.pdf

Project is the development of a Community Assessment that will also serve as out California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Clearance Document. Work will be conducted in coordination with our TPI Partners: US Forest Service, BLM, CAL FIRE, Lassen County, the Janesville and Milford Fire Protection Districts, Honey Lake Resource Conservation District and the Susanville Indian Rancheria.
2020
January – December 2020 TPI Monthly Meetings
January – Landowner & Community Outreach
February – Finalize Target Treatment Areas
March – Georeferenced Mapping & Soil Surveys
April thru July – Cultural Resource Surveys
May – Wildlife Surveys
Jun thru July – Assembly of Data and Draft Planning Document
August – Scoping
September – Final Document-Community Assessment/CEQA Clearance
October – File with RCD for CEQA Clearance
November – RCD CEQA Approval
December – CEQA Complete

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Our project is the top priority in the Lassen Community Wildfire Protection Plan due to the high hazardous fuel loads, fire history and the relatively high populations of the communities within the project area that have challenging evacuation options. The project work of forest thinning through biomass utilization and mastication will tie into previous completed fuel reduction work conducted by LCFSC and work that is being planned by TPI and the USFS and BLM. The majority of the southern boundary of the project area is Plumas National Forest (PNF) land where some of the heaviest fuels are located. Between PNF and the communities are large parcels of private land which are targeted for treatments due to their high fuel loads. The federal agencies will be the lead agencies for their NEPA environmental clearances and Honey Lake RCD, in partnership with LCFSC, will be the lead for CEQA clearances; CEQA because we are in pursuit of state funds for our project’s implementation.
TPI meetings have had great attendance, at times standing room only. The residents are highly enthusiastic and are in the midst of a project supporting petition drive to demonstrate community support. This enthusiasm is also being channeled into neighbor to neighbor outreach to get large private land parcels signed up for environmental clearances and project implementation.

The LCFSC is requesting funding to complete project planning and work necessary to obtain environmental clearances because these will be critical to getting projects implemented. In addition, this will aid the LCFSC to leverage other resources as the fire safe council will receive higher priority when competing for implementation funding if project planning is underway and projects are ready to proceed or nearly ready to proceed. Lassen County has contributed funding to the LCFSC over the last 10 years for the disposal of woody debris through Green Waste Days. The TPI began as a result of Lassen County residents approaching the fire safe council to aid with hazardous fuels reduction in the Janesville-Milford corridor. Seeking funding to support the TPI initiative supports the LCFSC’s goal of helping to protect communities and their residents from wildfire and supporting residents in taking responsibility for the actions they can take to reduce wildfire risk.

TPI was established in June of 2019 and we began our monthly meetings in July with the goal of implementing cross boundary fuel treatments that will make the forest and watersheds within and surrounding the TPI communities more resilient, and thereby reducing their wildfire risk. All of the below entities are active and committed partners.

Our TPI Collaboration Partners and their contributions are as follows:
US Forest Service – Collaborative Planning in conjunction with the planning their cross- boundary treatments
BLM – Collaborative Planning in conjunction with the planning their cross- boundary treatments
CAL FIRE – Fuels assessments and treatment recommendations
Lassen County – Coordination with county agencies
Janesville FPD – Fire Dept. input and community outreach
Milford FPD – Fire Dept. input and community outreach
Honey Lake RCD – Lead Agency for CEQA Clearance
Susanville Indian Rancheria – Native American Consultations
Public – 30 – 70 individuals attend our monthly meetings providing important feedback, ideas and community outreach

Our measures of success for this planning project will be: 1. How many landowners/acres have signed up for our treatments, and; 2. How may acres have been cleared for environmental compliance. Ultimately, we hope to have a minimum 4,000 acres signed up and cleared for treatments. Long term our measures of success will be, the award of funding for project implementation and the completion of treatments on all the signed-up properties. Longer term our measure of success will be the ongoing maintenance of the treatments, which will be monitored and facilitated by LCFSC & TPI’s active community engagement through field tours, workshops, and meetings.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/TPI-COCO-AIM-LOS-Lassen-BOS.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/TPI-COCO-AIM-LOS-PNF.pdf
Island Park Sustainable Fire Community Neighborhood Amassador Project
Island Park Sustainable Fire Community – 501c3 Non-Profit
Paula Nelson
PO BOX 493
Island Park, ID 83429
208.680.6852
208.680.6852
ipsustainablefire@gmail.com
Yes

Founded in 2012, the Island Park Sustainable Fire Community (IPSFC) is a non-profit organization, governed by a Board of Directors and engaging with private landowners to raise awareness about the risk of wildfires to the community and offering property owners resources and financial incentives to assist them in fuels mitigation and the creation of defensible space around their homes and businesses. The IPSFC project is located in southeastern Idaho, adjacent to Yellowstone National Park and part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The project area encompasses 588,000 acres, comprising 30,000 acres of private land, the city of Island Park, and lands owned/managed by the Caribou-Targhee National Forest, BLM, IDL, BOR, Harriman and Henry’s Lake State Parks. Through grant funding, the IPSFC has provided more than 400 homeowners in Island Park with wildfire risk evaluations, slash pick-up and cost-share fuels mitigation in the project area.

Personnel Capacity

The overall purpose of the Island Park Sustainable Fire Community project is to develop resilient landscapes and a sustainable, fire-adapted community consisting of informed and prepared citizens collaboratively working together to safely live with wildland fire. The IPFSC has successfully increased community awareness of its mission and participation in mitigation programs with some Island Park subdivisions through neighbor-to-neighbor word of mouth, homeowner satisfaction with fuels reduction work, and presentations at community/homeowner meetings. This specific project seeks to build upon IPSFC’s previous success and scale-up our outreach efforts by funding a Neighborhood Ambassador Program (NAP) Coordinator who will recruit, train, and support 7-10 volunteer NAP leaders in high-risk sub-divisions. These volunteer leaders will, with the support of the NAP Coordinator, recruit stakeholders in their subdivisions to participate in fire-adapted trainings and wildfire risk home evaluations and will influence and encourage stakeholders to take action to mitigate fuels on their properties through IPSFC funded programs. Additionally, this proposal seeks funding for two outreach personnel who will conduct wildfire risk evaluations with property owners who become interested in taking action as a result of participation with newly formed NAP community groups. IPSFC has built a data-base of contacts and a cadre of leaders who can assist the coordinator’s recruitment efforts.

Yes

The IPSFC is a Wildland Urban Interface project. The IPSFC’s overall objective is long-term and at a landscape scale: To develop a sustainable fire-adapted social and ecological community that is resilient and accepting of fire, insects and disease disturbances. There is an intermix of private property and public lands including IDL, Forest Service and BLM. Private landowners and public land agencies work together in a community-based approach to create a landscape capable of withstanding wildfire. Due to the nature of the vegetation, increases in property development and poor ingress/egress, IPSFC’s top priorities are improving homeowners’ defensible space, improving and maintaining ingress/egress in high-risk neighborhoods, and coordinating fuels treatments across both public and private land to create large parcels of land where fuels have been changed so fire burns with lower intensity adjacent to homes. IPSFC’s mitigation work coordinates with that of our partner public agencies.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/IPSFC_StructureHazardRating_-map.pdf

In addition to risk to human life, the values at risk include over 7,600 developed lots in 300 subdivisions which include historic structures, City of Island Park, homes, campgrounds, hotels, businesses, state parks, communication sites, the Island Park Dam and major powerlines for Island Park and West Yellowstone. Additionally, Island Park has an economy based on tourism and the recreational opportunities offered by public and private land.

Yes
http://www.co.fremont.id.us/departments/emergency_management/AHMP/Fremont%20County%20AHMP%202016%20FINAL.pdf
Yes

Labor:
Neighborhood Ambassador Coordinator–40wks (Mar.–Nov.,2020), 25hrs/week, $25/hr = $25,000.00
Outreach Rep/Fire risk evaluator (2 positions)–22 weeks (June-Oct., 2020), 20hrs/week, $20/hr = $17,600
In-Kind Match:
Neighborhood Ambassador Leader volunteer hours – 22 weeks (June-October), 10 hrs/week, 10 volunteer leaders for a total of 2,200 hours at $25/hr. = $55,000
Mileage:
2000 miles/.58 per mile = $1,160 for travel to subdivision meetings and to provide risk evaluations/mitigation prescriptions
Materials/Supplies:
Postage–2000 items/.40 = $800 for direct mailings
Printing–2000/$0.22 = $440
Indirect:
10% = $5,000

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/IPSFC-AIM-Round-3-Budget.pdf

The Island Park Sustainable Fire Community project area is located in southeastern Idaho, adjacent to Yellowstone National Park, and part of the iconic Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The project area encompasses 588,000 acres and includes private land (30,000 acres), the city of Island Park, and lands owned/managed by the following entities: Fremont County, the Caribou-Targhee National Forest (525,000 acres), Idaho Department of Lands (19,000 acres), Harriman and Henry’s Lake State Park and the Bureau of Land Management (14,000 acres). The area serves as a major migration corridor for elk, moose, mule deer, and pronghorn antelope and provides critical habitat for the Greater Yellowstone grizzly bear population. It also provides important wetland and aquatic habitat for trumpeter swans and Yellowstone cutthroat trout inhabiting a world-class fishery.

The project area is heavily forested, with young and mature lodgepole pine being the dominant species while Douglas-fir, Sub-alpine fir, Spruce and White bark pine are found in the higher elevations. Much of the area was heavily managed from the 1960’s into the 1980’s which created a forest structure and age class that has veered from historical norms. Wildfire has mostly been absent from the landscape for over 100 years due to suppression efforts and past management practices except for 1988 and 2008 when the area experienced large wildfires.

Values at risk include over 7,600 developed lots in 300 home developments and firefighter and public safety. Island Park has an economy based on tourism and the draw of natural resources, including wildlife viewing and fishing, found on public lands. Homes and developments adjoin forested public land and are at high risk for wildfire due to the presence of significant ladder fuels, lack of defensible space, and a lack of well-planned and maintained egress routes.

Neighborhood Ambassador Program Coordinator – 25 hr/week, 40 weeks, AIM funded. Recruits, supports and trains 7-10 volunteer Neighborhood Ambassador leaders and community groups to increase demand for risk evaluations/prescriptions (funded by AIM) and fuels treatment opportunities available through other IPSFC funding.
Outreach Representative/Home risk evaluator – 2/20-hour/wk positions, AIM funded. Evaluators will attend meetings and sign-up homeowners for evaluations/prescriptions, conduct evaluations and follow-up with homeowners regarding treatments on their property and/or inform them of opportunities for cost-share mitigation or slash pick-up as available through other IPSFC funding.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/IPSFC-PROJECT-MAP-Reduced-1.pdf

Activities participants: Neighborhood Ambassador Program Coordinator, Volunteer Ambassador Leaders, and Risk Evaluators.
Late Feb.-April
Neighborhood Ambassador Coordinator recruits and gains commitment from 7-10 Volunteer Ambassador leaders in target sub-divisions. Prepares educational materials. Trains Ambassador leaders. Builds membership in community groups.
May, July, Aug.
Collaboratively plan and conduct three Neighborhood Ambassador community education meetings. Pre & post perceptions survey completed. Volunteer leaders developed.
May-Sept.
50 homeowner risk evals/prescriptions conducted. Mitigation efforts tracked. Homeowner participation in slash pick-up or cost-share contracts (funded by other IPSFC grants.)
Sept.-Nov.
Slash pick-up and cost-share contracts monitored and completed. NAP coordinator and volunteer leaders create a meeting calendar for 2021 season and identify back-up leader. Slash is picked up and hauled to the slash pit. Cost-share fuels reduction completed.

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In the last two years, the awareness of the IPSFC’s mission and work on the ground in the Island Park community has increased significantly. Much this increase is due to neighbor-to-neighbor word of mouth and homeowner satisfaction with cost-share fuels reduction work conducted by IPSFC. The formation of 7 to 10 volunteer Neighborhood Ambassador Program leaders and community groups, and the subsequent outreach and education efforts conducted with these groups, will significantly increase community member commitment to the necessity for wildfire preparedness and lead to fire-adapted communities consisting of informed and prepared citizens collaboratively working together to safely live with wildland fire. The previous work of the IPSFC has shown that informed citizens not only take action to mitigate fuels on their own property, they encourage their neighbors to do the same. This synergy, created with the support and collaboration of a NAP coordinator, will increase the number of homeowners who seek out risk evaluations and take consequent steps (funded by other IPSFC monies) to make their property safe and resilient in the face of a wildfire event, thus leading to increased action on the ground.

The Island Park fire department and Fire Chief position are voluntary, so as a community, we depend greatly on the actions of private citizens to create a fire-sustainable community. The need for education about wildfire safety and fuels mitigation is paramount to ensuring that we are prepared for a wildfire event. IPSFC believes that developing NAP leaders and groups in our most at-risk sub-divisions will greatly support the IPSFC’s education and outreach mission and allow us to allocate resources from our other grant funding to slash pick-up and cost-share fuels mitigation. Funding from AIM for a NAP coordinator would allow the IPSFC to increase community outreach toward our goal of becoming a fire-adapted community. We feel that increased interest in fuels mitigation, resulting from the proposed Neighborhood Ambassador program, along with available risk evaluators, would allow IPSFC to to complete significant fuels reduction on the ground.

Members of the USFS attend our large group meeting, advise the IPSFC on all projects, and allow us to use one of their gravel pits to dump slash and then help burn it for us this winter.

The Nature Conservancy’s (TNC) Fire Learning Network and Fire Adapted Community Learning Network provides funding for outreach efforts not covered by other awards. TNC staff also provides in-kind assistance with the development of communication strategies and grant writing and will help establish our Neighborhood Ambassador program. In addition,TNC promotes the work of IPSFC through educational events at their Flat Ranch Preserve visitor center.

The BLM is currently doing fuels reduction around private lands and encouraging property owners to complete fuels reduction work adjacent to agency lands.

The coordinator of Fremont County Emergency Management Services attends the IPSFC large group meetings, provides advisement, and shares IPSFC messages in their media.

Fremont County Commissioners and fire officials will include IPSFC announcements on their web pages and emails.

Homeowners will provide match through leadership, risk planning, event attendance, and hours worked creating and removing slash.

Capacity building: We will measure the number of participants in the Neighborhood Ambassador program including participation increases.

Education and outreach: The NAP coordinator will develop and conduct a brief survey regarding perceptions of Firewise concepts, fire-adaptability, and the need for mitigation efforts in communities to collect baseline data. At the end of the summer, the coordinator will conduct a brief post survey to measure changes in perceptions about the topics listed above.

Mitigation: We will track the increase in new risk evaluation referrals which are a result of NAP meetings. We will keep track of property addresses that participate in our slash and cost-share programs. Latitude and longitude will be collected and participation mapped see which subdivisions are participating and which ones need more support. We anticipate at least a 10% increase in participation in IPSFC mitigation projects as a result of the Neighborhood Ambassador program.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/IPSFC-Richey-Neighborhood-Ambassador.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/IPSFC-Davy-letter-of-support.pdf
Columbia Springs Estates Community Hazardous Fuels Reduction
Lincoln County Conservation District – Special Purpose District
Kristen Balko
PO Box 46
Davenport WA 99122
509-725-4181
509-725-4181
kbalko@wadistrict.net
Yes

The Lincoln County Conservation District (LCCD) is a local government organization established initially by President Roosevelt’s 1935 Soil and Conservation Act and the 1939 Washington State Legislature.
As a conservation district, LCCD provides technical assistance for natural resource conservation projects including pre-fire mitigation and fire risk reduction activities within Lincoln County. LCCD has recently partnered with Washington Fire Adaptive Communities, Washington Department of Natural Resources, National Fish and Wildlife, and the Bureau of Land Management, to promote and implement Firewise-like methods, roadside fuel breaks, and weed management projects to reduce wildfire risk.
The Lincoln County Conservation District’s (LCCD) five employees (District Manager, Soil Technician, Project Manager, Outreach Coordinator, and Financial Administrator) have more than four decades of combined experience in providing technical assistance and associated grant management.

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Planning, Equipment Purchase

The Columbia Springs Estates Community Association (CSECA) has been identified in Lincoln County’s Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan (MHMP) as a high-risk area fire activity due to a buildup of vegetation near steep slopes and historically high winds. To mitigate these risks, the CSECA has developed their own Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) and has received funding through the Washington State Department of Natural Resources to develop Firewise USA Community Assessments. However, once these assessments are completed, the community will be left to fund the implementation of these hazardous fuel mitigation and reduction efforts themselves.
This project will develop and administer a cost share program to implement fuel reduction projects based on the results of these assessments. This project will protect the residential homes and businesses, National Park Service properties, federal, state and county roads and highways, as well as the nearby Grand Coulee Dam – the largest power station in the United States.
Specifically, this project will:
1. Enable the 46 residents of the CSECA to protect themselves from wildfire hazards through local land stewardship.
2. Reduce approximately 20 acres of shrub-steppe fuel from the CSECA to the mitigate the fire risk for the wider area owned by multiple entities.
3. Disseminate project information to at least 100 Lincoln County residents, stakeholders, fire district staff and at least 200 members of the Firewise USA Learning Network.

Yes

While the cost share projects will be done in the CSECA neighborhood, the residents outside of this boundary to the east and west will also benefit from the fuel-reduction work. Further out, the CSECA community is bordered to the north by the National Park Service and is within two aerial miles of the Coulee Dam to the northwest. There is also a bridge near the dam that if damaged, would cut off access to the dam and severely jeopardize its function. Therefore, both government agencies would benefit by the increased wildfire protection of this neighborhood.
The community CWPP also identifies highway 174 to the south as a fire risk, as there is little government funding for fuel breaks along this and other state and county roads. While this project does not substitute work done by state and federal agencies, it can be used in tandem to create an effective, local and government Firewise protection partnership.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/LC-MHMP-CSECA-fire-risk-2019-150×150.jpg

The CSECA community is identified in Lincoln County’s 2019 MHMP as a high-risk wildfire area and targeted for financial assistance to implement Firewise treatment methods. Through this project, the CSECA residents will take ownership of their properties to reduce the risk of a wildfire spark and create defensible spaces if a fire is ignited outside the community. If untreated, this community is likely to experience the financial, health and psychological costs associated with a wildfire event.

Yes
https://www.dropbox.com/s/zcbhd79w24yyror/Lincoln_HMP.pdf?dl=0
Yes

We are asking for funds for 124 hours of LCCD staff time to establish and administer the cost share program to the CSECA residents and to develop and disseminate promotional outreach products. This outreach effort also includes $250 in supply charges (paper, envelopes, postage, poster board, and ink). Five site visits are planned for meetings and documentation needs. Matching funds include $2000 from the CSECA residents as part of their cost share contribution. WA DNR has a firm commitment in the attached letter of support to commit $4000 in staff time for technical assistance. LCCD will commit 20 hours of staff time for financial reporting and will cover the 10% indirect charges for all staff time included in this project (144 hours).

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/LCCD-AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable.pdf

The CSECA project area is in the northwest corner of Lincoln County, WA bordered to the north by the Columbia River. This shrub-steppe area is dry, with around 9 inches of annual rainfall, and has steep, broken terrain and escarpments sloping into the southern shore of the river. The shrub-steppe grasslands are a mixed plant community consisting of bunch grasses, forbs, and a variety of shrubs including big sage brush, rabbit brush, and antelope brush. This area has not experienced a fire in decades and has a substantial amount of dense vegetation and invasive grasses.
All these elements have created a high wildfire risk for the community members. This risk is intensified by the home site development as it is close to the thick vegetation of steep slopes next to the water’s edge. As the CWPP notes, during a wildfire event, families in this area would have very little time to protect their homes and evacuate. Therefore, it is very important that homeowners along the Columbia River be more vigilant than others in the county to create and maintain defensible space around their structures prior to an ignition. This project directly aligns with this CWPP recommendation, as it will provide homeowners the ability to protect their own community through fuels reduction projects as recommended by site evaluations. These projects may include, but are not limited to, thinning, clearing, pruning and limbing, and controlled burns or a combination of these and others fire mitigation methods.
As noted above, this area is also surrounded by government entities, including the National Park Service, that would greatly benefit from these increased fire risk protection measures. Of note is the proximity to Grand Coulee Dam, which if inaccessible or damaged, would jeopardize the energy source for the region at large.

In total 144 hours in LCCD staff time will be included in this project for administration of the cost share project to the residents of the CSECA. This time includes the establishment and administration of the 50%-50% cost share program with these residents, mileage and travel time, promotional product development and dissemination to spread the story of the first Firewise Community in the county before, during, and after project implementation to recruit other neighborhoods to establish their own Firewise Communities, and financial and programmatic reporting. The CSECA residents will contribute 50% to the fuel reduction projects through the cost share and WA DNR has made a commitment to provide $4,000 in staff time for these projects.

No equipment will be purchased through this project. Rather, residents will have the option to use their own equipment or rent equipment to implement their fuel reduction project using cost-share funds.

The CSECA has 20 properties included – ranging from .5 to 8 acres per property. The number of treatments applied and the type of treatment to be used will be based on the results of Firewise USA Community Assessments that are currently taking place. Due to the vegetation and topography of this area, it is hypothesized that the work will include, but is not limited to, thinning, clearing, pruning and limbing, and controlled burns, if deemed appropriate. This project aligns with additional efforts the National Park Service (documented in a CSECA draft CWPP) to establish a 30-foot fire break along the boarder of the CSECA. Funding efforts have preventing this project from implementation.

No planning efforts are proposed in this project. Lincoln County, WA already has a FEMA-approved Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan MHMP that includes this community as a high risk area for wildfire. LCCD was included in the development of this MHMP as a source of technical support and conduit of project funding. Additionally, the CSECA residents are in the process of completing their own CWPP in an effort to protect themselves from this wildfire risk. As such, this proposal will cover the implementation of fuels reduction projects to comply with these planning documents.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/CSECA-aerial-and-location.pdf

November 15, 2019: Award Announcement
November 15, 2019 to March 2020: Cost-share documents established, initial outreach efforts to the CSECA residents for cost-share sign-up, and completion of Firewise Community Assessments. Initial project promotion by LCCD to wider network in local, State, and Nation to promote Firewise Communities.
March 2020 to May 2020: LCCD completes all cultural resources and permitting needs for the project.
May 2020 to October 2020: Hazardous fuel reduction project implementation work is completed for CSECA residents on a 50%-50% cost share basis and as weather conditions allow. LCCD will promote success story as these projects are implemented to wider network to recruit other neighborhoods to do similar work.
October 2020 to November 2020: LCCD completes and submits final program report and project close-out. LCCD will promote project as a whole to local, regional, and national networks to promote COCO and recruit other communities for similar work.

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The CSECA has been identified in Lincoln County’s Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan (MHMP) as a high-risk area fire activity and has experienced a large fire near their community in 2018. To mitigate these risks, the CSECA has been pro-active and has developed their own Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP). This community has also received funding through the Washington State Department of Natural Resources to develop Firewise USA Community Assessments and become the county’s first Firewise Community. However, once these assessments are completed, the community will be left to fund the implementation of these hazardous fuel reduction projects themselves. That is where this proposed cost share program comes in – to implement fuel reduction projects based on the results of these assessments. By completing this project in this community, the residential homes and businesses, National Park Service properties, federal, state and county roads and highways, as well as the nearby Grand Coulee Dam – the largest power station in the United States – will be substantially more resilient to wildfire. Additionally, this community’s success story will be utilized by LCCD to promote the establishment of new Firewise Communities in the County and in the region and to jump start similar efforts through state and federal government entities, such as a fuel break on land owned by NPS. This NPS project was also identified in the CSECA’s draft CWPP.

Funding became available through the WA DNR in 2019 for the CSECA to develop Firewise USA Community Assessments. However, once these assessments are completed, the community will be left without funding to implement these hazardous fuel reduction efforts. LCCD has been promoting Firewise methods in efforts in the past, but has not had an established Firewise USA Community within the county as of yet. The establishment of this Firewise Community and the implementation of hazardous fuels reduction projects will serve as a tipping point for LCCD. The CSECA success story will be used as a model that others can follow to establish more Firewise Communities in the region and create a more wildfire resilient landscape. This project fits within the mission of LCCD, as we are a local, special purpose district and regularly use cost share programs to enable residents to take responsibility of their property and solve problems using proven methods, such as those available in the Firewise program.

(Federal) NPS: Letter of Support describing additional projects outside of their neighborhood that will go hand in hand with the proposed fuels reduction work.

(Federal) US Congressional Representative Cathy McMorris-Rogers: Letter of Support stating proposed projects such as this are personal priorities to her and her work.

(State) DNR: Letter of Support (uploaded) and declared matching contribution in staff time and mileage of at least $4,000 to the project goal of increasing the survivability of homes in and around the CSECA. DNR assistance will include technical assistance, education events and other activities, in reducing the impact of wildfire to the community.

(County) Lincoln County Fire District 9 Commissioners: Letter of Support (uploaded) stated they will match efforts within the limits of our resources through professional services, education, and labor hours to educate CSECA residents on Firewise USA Community Assessment findings and options to reduce hazardous fuels in their community. This assistance includes any cultural resource clearances and permitting needed. Actual financial amount could not be estimated, so it was left out of the proposed budget

(County) Lincoln County Commissioners: Letter of Support for proposal.

(County) Lincoln County Conservation District Board of Supervisors: Letter of Support for proposal.

(Private) CSECA residents: Verbal commitment to participate in the 50%-50% cost share program administered by LCCD.

Short term success will be measured by the number of acres treated (at least 20) and the amount of hazardous fuels removed from the community. As with all LCCD projects, this work will follow standardized methods (in this case those set forth by DNR) to ensure it is done correctly. These methods include future monitoring spot checks to ensure its sustainability. Long term success will be shown in the outreach and promotional potential of this fuels reduction project and the establishment of other Firewise USA Communities within Lincoln County, WA. Further, it will be used to show a collaborative effort between local and state and federal entities toward the mutual goal of wildfire resistance and resilience. Therefore, the success will be measured on three different fronts: the reduction of hazardous material in and around the CSECA, the recruitment of additional Firewise USA Communities, and the continued collaborative and partnership work from a variety of organizations and entities.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/DNR-LOS.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Fire-commissioner-LOS.pdf
Lake Chinook Fire Community Collaborative Fuels Mitigation Project
Lake Chinook Fire & Rescue Fire Protection District
Don Colfels
11700 SW Graham Rd
CULVER
+15416298911
5419770988
don@lakechnookfire.org
Yes

The Lake Chinook Fire & Rescue fire protection district is located on Lake Billy Chinook on the high desert plateau. It covers nearly 105 square miles of territory, 25 miles from the nearest town or mutual aid. Roadways are two lane county roads with 50% unpaved, some non-graded.
The fire district which was formed in 2008, serves a retirement / vacation, recreational resort community of 573 full‐time residents. The area hosts an additional 36,000 visitors during the summer months. Over the past three decades, many retired residents have moved to the area with 87% of the population aged 60 years or older.
The District is comprised of four subdivisions, consisting of clusters of homes, small businesses and surrounding ranch lots, has scattered private timber land and is surrounding by federally lands managed by Deschutes National Forest, Crooked River National Grassland and BLM. The largest subdivision, Three Rivers, is comprised of approximately 650 home on 4,000 acres is off-grid.
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Fuels Reduction

The proposed action is to limb up and thin the juniper and brush species which have taken over the area. The proposal is to reduce overall risks to vulnerable populations and structures, while also reducing reliance on funding from actual disaster declarations. The purpose of the Lake Chinook Fire Community Collaborative Fuels Mitigation Project is to help protect residents and firefighters in the project area in the event of a wildfire and to reduce the potential impacts of a catastrophic wildfire in the communities. The need for this action is detailed below.
The goal of the project is to minimize fire danger in subdivisions and neighborhoods and make firefighting safer and more effective. It has been proven during recent catastrophic wildfire events that defensible space and fuels reduction is extremely effective in this fuel model. If a property reduces fuel immediately around structures and out 100 feet, surface fire rarely impacts a structure.
The work schedule is quite simple. Step 1 Identify the parcels to be treated based on risk analysis. Step 2. Engage property owners and contract the work to be done. Step 3. Property owner or contractors perform the work. Step 4. Property Owner submits completed volunteer time sheet form. Step 5. Fire Dept. official reviews property to insure proper standards have been met.
Construction of fuel breaks and fire line, Reducing fuels beyond defensible space will be performed by thinning crews.
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Yes

Wildfires have increased in intensity and severity over the past decade, threatening our safety, health, water security, economic security and environment. Forest treatments in High-Risk areas are critical to mitigate catastrophic wildfire. It is not only up to forest land managers, state forestry, private landowners, but all property owners who choose to live on the WUI. Wildfire knows no geographic, economic or demographic boundaries. It is up to all landowners to work to make the landscape resilient to catastrophic wildfire, to become fire adapted.
In our formal risk assessment, The 4 subdivisions within the Lake Chinook Fire district are all rated “Extreme” with two subdivisions receiving a “High Density Extreme” Rating.
This project by property owners and land management agencies continue to help reduce these risks. This project will compliment several of other projects in the immediate area both on Federal lands as well as private lands.
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Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Risk_AssessmsntMap.pdf

The proposed project area targets 2 neighborhoods that have been rated in our CWPP as High Density Extreme. The proposed action would occur on private property parcel in and around structures on property which have the highest Natural Vegetative Fuel Hazard Factor Value. Fuels reduction activities would occur on a localized scale and focus on protection of structures in contiguous areas, thus likely reducing the spread/severity of wildfires.
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Yes
http://www.lakechinookfireandrescue.org/cwpp/index.php
Yes

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The total budget is estimates at $85,490. This includes all aspects of the project. The proposal request does meet the 100% match of requested grant resources. The 100% match uses both private fund, and In-Kind sources. The Aim Award Share is $42,739. The Match share is $42,751. The First phase of the project is the defensible space on 103 lot treating 51.5 acres. The project cost is $33,475. This is funded by in-kind sweat equity by the property owners.
The Fire Break, Shaded Fuel Break and fuels reduction beyond the defensible space is funded at $7500 Cash paid by the HOA. $1776 Is for dozer work provided by the Fire district. The total match equals $42,751.
The Aim Award will cover the thinning crew labor, Chipper Rental and mileage.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-6.pdf

Lake Chinook Fire & Rescue protection district is located in a extremely fire prone area. Vegetative types found in our area are diverse. Lower elevations that receive less than 10 inches of precipitation annually are vegetated with primarily western juniper woodland, decantant bitter brush, sage brush, rabbit brush and cheat / blue bunch wheatgrass grasses. Two out of the four subdivisions are classified as “High Density Extreme” fire-risk classification area, according to Oregon Forestland-Urban Interface Fire Protection Act. The remaining area is classified as “Extreme”.

Forest Park Estates has 59 Tax lots and approximately 100 structures. Minimal amount of defensible space work has been done in this community. The 2015 CWPP rated Forest Park Estates as High Density Extreme. Forest Park Estate is located at 2654 foot elevation at 440 31.850 N latitude and -1210 19.362 W. Approximately 20 acres of additional work needs to be done on the roadsides to clear brush and junipers which includes treatment of 30’ from centerline of road (or 5’ from edge of pavement).

The Three River community has 650 tax lots. Most lots are between 2.5 to 5 acre parcels. The 2015 CWPP rated Three Rivers as High Density Extreme. The lots at the greatest risk are those located on slopes of Big Canyon. Forty four lots and approximately 100 structures have been identified to be at extreme risk. The proposed project location is at Upper Canyon Rim Dr. All structures are located atop the canyon’s rim. These lots would be treated on the canyon side up to 200′ downslope. Treatment will break up juniper and shrub continuity and reduce fuel loads to create a more fire resilient plant community.
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The defensible space work on the 103 tax lots would be done in combination by the participating property owner. It is anticipated that each property owner would treat approximately .5 acres (200′ downslope by 100′ wide) on 103 lots. The property owner is expected to average 13 man hours to accomplish the 1/2 acre treatment. In-kind time should be accounted for using a $25.00 per hour rate, and must have documentation volunteer Time sheets. This is estimated at $33,475.
The road side work and the shaded fuel break in Forest Park and and 3 Rivers is 53 acres and anticipated to be performed by contracted thinning crews. estimated at $37,698.00
##

The Equipment cost listed in this grant application is to cover the operational costs of the Fire District’s 650 dozer. The dozer would be used to create a firebreak on the west side of the Forest Park subdivision between the Federal Crooked River Nation Grassland and the private property adjacent to it. The dozer line firebreak would tie into a 100″ wide shaded fuelbreak. The firebreak and the fuel break are North-to-South and will be linked to an existing east / west road system. The cost of the dozer operation is $1776.00
The additional equipment cost is to rent the Oregon Department of Forestry Chipper. The Chipper cost is $400/ day we have budgeted 10 days. This will be used to turn the biomass into a usable material.
##

The Fuels reduction project is broken into 2 areas. The first, Creating defensible space around homes and structures on 103 lots 51.5 acres in extremely high risk areas to be performed by property owners. The work will be done to The Oregon Forestland-Urban Interface Fire Protection Act (SB-360) and Firewise guideline. The biomas would be either chipped or piled to burn.
The second portion of the project deals with constructing fire breaks and fuel breaks to reduce fuel loads on the HOA common land directly adjacent to the federal lands. Reducing fuels beyond defensible space on the HOA common land, to reduce the fire intensity as it enters the sub-divisions and beneath the structures on the canyon rims.

The proposed project is part of an ongoing Wildfire fuels mitigation and fuels reduction project. A catastrophic wildfire now threatens our communities almost every year. No longer can we rely simply on wildfire personnel to safely and successfully defend a structure while it is being threatened by a wildfire. There are not always adequate resources available to take some form of meaningful fire suppression action to defend the structure. When more than one structure is imperiled by a wildfire in a rural setting like ours, it is highly unlikely a volunteer fire department will have sufficient apparatus and personnel to “protect” multiple structures simultaneously. Mutual aid in our area takes up to 2 hours to get to the fire ground.
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https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-ProjectMap-compressed.pdf

The Project is anticipated to be complete in 1-2 years depending on weather. The First Phase would be to achieve the property owner buy-in. This would be fall/ Winter 2019. Property Owners would be encouraged to begin defensible space work in winter/spring 2019-20. A 50% buy-in would represent a major milestone within the first 6 months. Thinning crews and dozer work would begin early spring 2020. The fire break and shaded fuel break along the Federal land will be completed spring 2020. This would represent another milestone. Crew would also complete the roadside work in Forest Park early 2020. Goal #3. Fuels reduction work below upper Canyon Rim Dr in 3 Rivers could be completed as early as summer of 2020. The defensible space work performed by property owners will take the most time to complete. Most likely 2 years. At that point, the project wold be considered complete.
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This project expands upon ongoing local collaborative efforts to protect the communities within and surrounding the Lake Chinook Fire-Rescue District. This is the first project that will be implemented across all ownership’s include Federal, State, Home owner Association common land and private property owners. This proposed project also implements several high priority area and projects consistent with the 2016 Jefferson County CWPP. Additionally, this project mitigates threats of catastrophic wildfire initiating on federal land and threatening the structures on private property. This project will compliment a number of other projects in the area both on Federal lands as well as private lands.
The outreach which is necessary to implement the grant will strengthen ties with the community and the HOA. This renewed engagement of the community always leads to an increase in individual project> we plan on highlighting feature property owner’s accomplishments to encourage others to participate.

Large projects like this are necessary to make our community more resilient and fire adaptive. In the 2018 Graham Fire, over 2100 acres burned in the first operational period. We were able to contain the fire once it hit the sub-division on roads that had fuels mitigation work completed only 2 years prior. With out the grant to build fuel breaks on the perimeter roads of the subdivision, many more structures would have been lost. As it ends up, only 3 homes were lost with several out buildings along the top of Big Canyon. The proposed funding will help us complete more fuel breaks like those that stopped the Graham Fire. It will also help with defensible space work on those homes that sit above Big Canyon. By getting the home owner more involved we will be able to leverage the 2020 Title III County Funding to bring in more property owners other than those identified to be at the greatest risk in the proposal.

The Lake Chinook Fire Community Collaborative Fuels Mitigation Project is just that. It is a collaborative efforts between the fire district, the private land owners, 3 Rivers Home Owners Association, Forest Park Road managers, Federal partners Crooked River National Grassland (CRNG), BLM and the state and the Cove Palisades State Park.
This project expands upon ongoing local collaborative efforts to protect the communities within and surrounding the Lake Chinook Fire & Rescue District. It will enhances the Federal CRNG Westside Project which borders the Forest Park Subdivision. The 3 Rivers HOA will participate both with in-kind match and cash match for the fuels reduction fuels breaks beyond the defensible space. This proposal brings in 103 private property owners. Our outreach will show each individual property owner a prepared Risk Assessment/ Analysis specific to their property. Our plan is to have all property owners participate by signing a pledge to become fire adaptive and give them the assistance to reach that threshold.
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I hope it does not take another fire like the Graham Fire to measure how successful fuels mitigation work actually is. Fuels reduction and defensible space projects have been proven to work effectively in reducing suppression costs. Project such as this entice property owners to increase the work the do. Each year we survey every property owner as to how survivable their property and landscape is to wildfire. Our last survey was spring of 2019. Each year we do a individual property assessments using Survey 123. These assessments show on-the-ground wildfire risk reduction activities which have been done or currently being done. Further outreach is done to encourage additional mitigation activities.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-LCFR_LOS.pdf
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Component-Codes-and-Cost-Share-Rates.pdfCloquet Area Prescribed Fire Collaborative
Regents of the University of Minnesota
Lane Johnson, Research Forester on behalf of Andy David, Director of Operations, Cloquet Forestry Center
450 McNamara Alumni Center, 200 Oak St SE
Minneapolis
612-624-5599
218-726-6411
awards@umn.edu
Yes

The U of MN Cloquet Forestry Center (CFC) has been the primary demonstration and experimental forest for the U of MN since 1911 and serves as an educational resource for the entire Lake States Region. Located in the Lake Superior watershed, the forest provides space for researchers, practitioners, students, and members of the public to study and learn about northern forest ecosystems and their long-term sustainable management. We steward 3400 acres of land within the Fond du Lac Reservation of Lake Superior Chippewa (FDL) and are part of a landscape patchwork of tribal and private forest lands situated on a sandy outwash plain.

Since Autumn 2018, the CFC Forest Management and Research Office (two full-time, one part-time staff) has been actively working towards reintroducing fire to our fire-dependent uplands to mitigate the risk of catastrophic wildfire and increase the resilience and function of the fire-dependent ecological communities that cover two-thirds of our land base.

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction

The CFC will lead a collaborative prescribed fire project to build local capacity for the implementation of ecologically, culturally, and economically viable prescribed fire in northern Minnesota. The scope of this project includes application of planned fires across 200 acres of fire-dependent mixed pine woodlands located on University land. The only current option for prescribed fire implementation on CFC land is to grow partnerships with diverse stakeholders that are able to contribute personnel, equipment, and expertise to implement prescribed fire treatments.

This is a demonstration project with five primary objectives: 1) to resolve local capacity limitations by contracting with a NWCG-qualified burn boss with liability insurance to lead prescribed burns at CFC; 2) to catalyze the provisioning of governmental and NGO resources for fuel treatments using collaborative prescribed fire on University land; 3) further reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire in fire-dependent pine forest types at CFC; 4) to build local relationships, capacity, and technical expertise for future cross-jurisdictional prescribed fire in the region; and 5) demonstrate the viability of fuels management that directly applies place-based western-scientific and Indigenous knowledge of historical fire regimes to the ecological stewardship of fire-dependent forest types.

Yes

CFC is located on the FDL Reservation in Carlton County, MN. The project area lies within a landscape of fire-dependent forests that present a risk of catastrophic high-severity fire due to current fuel loads, projected climate trends, bio-cultural resources present, and adjacent infrastructure. Carlton County is ranked 8th in the state of Minnesota for number of acres classified as WUI, or 16% of the county’s land base – much of which is in the vicinity of the CFC.

The work proposed here will help create and reinforce heterogeneity in the landscape fuels mosaic; reduce the potential for a high-severity wildfire to burn large areas causing damage to diverse eco-cultural resources on University and adjacent lands; support capacity development for future collaborative prescribed fire; and provide an unrivaled opportunity to demonstrate best practices for prescribed fire use for strategic fuels reduction in WUI while simultaneously achieving ecological forestry objectives.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/CFCWildfireHazardPotentialMap2018-150×150.png

The CFC has 22 University structures and research assets associated with a century of management. There are 440+ mixed-ownership structures within one mile of CFC including two tribal administration complexes, two tribal schools, a tribal cultural center and museum, a county airport, a tribal health clinic, tribal nursing home, and the structures of roughly 80 private landowners. These assets are embedded within a sand plain that was historically shaped by frequent mixed-severity fire.

No
https://dps.mn.gov/divisions/hsem/hazard-mitigation/Pages/state-hazard-mitigation-plan.aspx
No
Please see below

Past forest management practices have allowed dense ladder fuels to develop across sites that were historically open forest/woodlands maintained by mixed-severity fire. CFC now has 5-square miles of largely contiguous forest fuels that are primed to burn during periods of high fire danger. Fuels reduction treatments across the University forest are now underway to limit the threat of catastrophic fire and adverse impacts to community assets located on University, tribal, and private lands.

We request $26,600 of AIM funding to contract with a NWCG-certified burn boss for prescribed fire implementation (see attached bid). Time allocated to this project by CFC staff for prep, implementation, and monitoring is contributed as in-kind match, valued at $18,945. Cash match of $10,640 from CFC has been allocated to contract out preparation of CFC fire plans and to purchase project materials. Cash match of $49,779 comes from an awarded MN DNR Conservation Partners grant to be used to contract out prescribed fire unit prep at CFC now through June 2022.

The U of MN lists an indirect cost of 33% for non-research projects at University facilities.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-R3_BudgetSpreadsheetFillable_20191011.pdf

The project area is a sandy outwash plain where surface fire historically occurred at 4-30 year intervals, which perpetuated fire-dependent pine woodland and forest types. Large portions of these landscapes have not seen fire for over a century due to fire suppression, fire exclusion, and an emphasis on production forestry. The area can be classified as wildland-urban intermix where forestlands and mixed-ownership structures are interwoven.

The CFC has been the demonstration and research forest for the U of MN since 1911. CFC manages 3,400 contiguous acres of forested lands within the FDL Reservation in Carlton County, two-thirds of which is classified as fire-dependent native plant communities, primarily dry-mesic pine forests and woodlands. The area last experienced catastrophic fire during the 1918 Cloquet-Moose Lake Fire that burned 250,000+ acres in four counties and killed over 450 people. It remains the second deadliest fire in United States history. A century later, the Minnesota public no longer considers wildfire to be a primary hazard to lives and property. However, wildfire risk remains high each spring and fall, wildfire suppression expenditures are high, fuel loads have increased, and many more private homes and community assets have been built in fire-dependent pine forest settings.

Obtain funding to contract with a NWCG-qualified burn boss with liability insurance to lead prescribed burn operations at CFC over a 14 day operational period in spring or summer 2020; 2) have personnel, equipment, and technical expertise for prescribed fire implementation at CFC available to supplement complementary fire operations within the area during the same operational period. Resources mobilized from across the region to support prescribed fire implementation at CFC have potential to support cross-jurisdictional prescribed fire operations that may not otherwise be accomplished due to the limited availability of local prescribed fire resources during the height of the wildfire season, either locally (spring) or nationally (summer).

Prescribed fire implementation is planned for 200 acres of University land – 75 acres have already received mechanical thinning, another 123 acres are scheduled for thinning in 2020 in preparation for prescribed fire. Repeat fire treatments will be used at these sites beyond 2021 to further reduce surface fuel loads and demonstrate the utility of paired mechanical and prescribed fire fuel treatments. In the case circumstances do not permit prescribed fire in 2020, AIM funding will be put towards mechanical fuel reduction in sites proximate to proposed Rx fire units. Fuels treatments with timber harvesting machinery and other mechanical forestry implements are ongoing to prepare future sites for prescribed fire and/or safe wildfire response.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/CFC_ProposedRxFireUnitsMap_20191007.pdf

Sept. 2019 – Onward: Milestone – Education/outreach on fuel and fire management; engage stakeholders in cross-cultural conversations. Outcomes – Build local support for prescribed fire as a tool for cross-jurisdictional fuel and fire management.

Aug. 2019 – Mar. 2020: Milestone – Work with contractor to develop prescribed fire plans with input from MN-DNR and FDL. Outcomes – Burn plans approved by MN-DNR and FDL.

Aug. 2019 – April 2020: Milestone – Formalize agreements between UMN and partners. Outcome – In-kind resources made available for prescribed fire at CFC.

Nov. 2019 – April 2020: Milestone – Complete prep of 2020 Rx units. Outcome – Units ready for May 2020 Rx fire.

May 2020 (Plan A) or Aug. 2020 (Plan B): Milestone – Implement Rx fire prescriptions. Outcome – Burn units treated at CFC. AARs used to guide future fire planning.

Autumn 2020 (Plan C): Milestone – Mechanically treat fuels on adjacent acres. Outcome –Increase heterogeneity in fuels to reduce risk of catastro

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This project includes catastrophic wildfire mitigation and capacity building for prescribed fire implementation.

These prescribed fire treatments are designed to build local capacity to mitigate the risk of catastrophic fire in forested areas of high ecological, cultural, and research value. This work builds on efforts already underway at CFC to reduce understory fuel loads through the targeted removal or reduction of ladder fuels through mechanical and hand treatments to expand defensible space and break up landscape fuels. As a whole, these efforts are meant to demonstrate how prescribed fire, when paired with mechanical fuels reduction, can be utilized as a tool to achieve ecologically-informed fuels mitigation to achieve multiple benefits. Prescribed fire sites treated in 2020 will be used as outdoor classrooms and laboratories and used for the education of current and future natural resource managers. It is crucial that UMN- CFC has prescribed fire demonstration sites as CFC hosts annual national USFS silvicultural training, U of MN student field courses, local and regional research and education events, and FDL tribal cultural programs.

In addition, this pilot project is the beginning of a larger and longer process of developing a collaboration of state, federal, tribal, and NGO partners across northern Minnesota that will work to develop options for cooperative cross-jurisdictional prescribed fire.

No fire management organization in Minnesota is currently willing to take on the liability of prescribed fire operations at CFC. Therefore, collaborative prescribed fire leadership and expertise is being sought from outside the region through the Forest Stewards Guild (FSG). FSG, with CFC as partner, secured $49,779 funding from the MN DNR for a three year fire restoration effort. This funding supports work to complete prescribed fire unit preparation from now to June 2022, but cannot be used by FSG, as the grantee, to contract with itself for planned fire implementation.

AIM grant support will allow us to secure FSG leadership in this initial prescribed fire effort and demonstrate successful implementation of collaborative prescribed fire on CFC lands. Successful fire reintroduction in 2020 at CFC will lay the foundation for a sustained, local partnership between University, state, tribal, and NGO partners where future prescribed fire leadership can be secured and fostered locally.

Collaborators and Partners:

Bureau of Indian Affairs, Minnesota Agency – technical assistance, personnel
Fond du Lac Band Division of Resource Management – technical assistance, personnel, equipment
Forest Stewards Guild – technical assistance, personnel, equipment
Lake States Fire Science Consortium – technical assistance, personnel
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources – personnel, equipment, technical assistance
The Nature Conservancy – technical assistance, personnel

Supporters:

American Bird Conservancy – 2018 project funding
Carlton County Land Office – technical assistance
Chippewa National Forest – technical assistance, equipment
Cloquet Area Fire District – personnel, equipment
Conservation Corps of Minnesota and Iowa – personnel, equipment
Dovetail Partners – technical assistance, public education and outreach
Superior National Forest – technical assistance, equipment
University of Minnesota Department of Forest Resources – technical assistance, personnel, outreach
University of Minnesota Northeast Region Extension Office – public education and outreach
University of Minnesota Sustainable Forests Education Cooperative – public education and outreach

Short term
• Three units prepped for prescribed fire.
• Cooperative prescribed fire agreements established among partner organizations including the CFC, FSG, MN-DNR, FDL
• 75 acres of fire-dependent woodland across three units treated with prescribed fire at CFC in 2020
• Fire effects monitoring plots (re)measured across three units scheduled for implementation in 2020

Long term
• Agreement established with local partner willing to take on fire liability and lead future planned fires at CFC
• Three additional units prepped for prescribed fire by Spring 2021 totaling 123 acres.
• Two additional unit-specific operational plans are written and approved by Spring 2021
• 123 acres treated with prescribed at CFC in 2021-22
• Fire effects monitoring plots (re)measured across three units scheduled for implementation in 2021-22
• # of educational tours and individuals touring prescribed fire demonstration sites
• # of fire practitioners exchanging information on prescribed fire use for fuel

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/FDL_Forestry_LetterOfSupport_COCOproposalR3_201909.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/MNDNR_LetterOfSupport_COCOproposalR3_201909.pdf
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/CFC_FSGRxFire_OpsProposal_20191002.pdfMattole Emergency Preparedness Planning
Mattole Restoration Council, 501c3
Ali Freedlund
PO Box 160
Petrolia, CA. 95558
(707) 629-3514
(707) 629-3514
ali@mattole.org
Yes

The Mattole Restoration Council (MRC), founded in 1983, works to improve the resiliency of our natural systems and human communities in the Mattole River watershed in coastal northern California. MRC works with hundreds of private landowners, state and federal agencies, local volunteer fire departments, and other conservation and education organizations. We began by focusing on the restoration of our native salmon runs. Today, MRC is actively working on riparian planting, grasslands restoration, sustainable forest management, public outreach, ecological education in the local public schools, water conservation, and hazardous fuels reduction. Our efforts fit under the following programs: Native Ecosystem Restoration, Working Lands and Human Communities, and Education and Outreach. Our staff includes 5 full time, 6 part-time and up to 30 seasonal employees that work on projects.

Planning

To help prevent wildfire impacts, this proposal by the Mattole Restoration Council (MRC) aims to empower residents in emergency preparedness and provide an updated atlas of maps to our volunteer fire departments. To do this we will:
1) Hold one regional evacuation planning meeting in collaboration with: Office of Emergency Services, County Sheriff, CAL-FIRE, Volunteer Fire Departments, Fire Safe Councils, and residents.
2) Hold approximately 50 neighborhood meetings with the dual purpose of forming Neighborhood Emergency Service Teams (NESTs) and updating neighborhood maps for the Mattole Fire Atlas to increase the effectiveness of emergency responders and each other’s knowledge of evacuation routes and challenges.
3) Involve volunteer firefighters at each neighborhood meeting to get to know representatives and hear about risks and challenges residents face in evacuation as well as safety concerns for first responders along access routes.
4) Prioritize access roads for future fuels treatment.
5) Update Mattole Fire Atlas on GIS from information gathered at meetings, ranking accessibility for firefighters.
6) Distribute Atlas in hardcopy and on tablets/Ipads to each of the 5 volunteer fire departments in our watershed.
7) Print and mail new NEST lists in the 5 areas.

Yes

This project will gather information from across privately-owned residential areas in the watershed to help neighborhoods plan and prepare for emergencies, and provide first responders with updated and easy-to-use maps on tablets. Neighborhood meetings are essential in setting up a system of communication for emergencies. In Petrolia there are 16 NESTs therefore 16 meetings. We project 10 NESTs in Honeydew, 10 in Ettersburg, 15 in Whitethorn and 5 in Whale Gulch for a potential of 56. Getting neighbors acquainted and understanding their needs/challenges in an evacuation and assigning a point person to interface with first responders could be life-saving.
Through neighborhood updates to the Mattole Fire Atlas, an important resource for volunteer fire departments since 2006, access roads will be ranked for future treatments. Once neighborhoods are organized (NESTs) and maps are updated and distributed, both residents and firefighters will have improved tools and processes in an emergency

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Mattole-Emergency-Preparedness-Planning-Map-AIM_optimized-3.pdf

The Mattole watershed lies between BLM lands and the largest old-growth redwood forest at Humboldt Redwoods State Park. Town populations in the watershed range from 250 to 600 with many rugged miles of separation. Volunteer firefighters are our first responders. Most neighborhoods are accessed via unpaved road systems packed with dense fuels. With AIM funding, MRC will be able to complete the entire Mattole Fire Atlas update and help organize neighborhoods into NESTs for emergency preparedness.

Yes
http://www.mattole.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/LM_CWPP_2016FINAL.pdf
Yes

Personnel includes: coordinating larger community meetings, conducting neighborhood meetings, GIS mapmaking for neighborhood maps and Atlas updates, project communications, training firefighters on the use of tablets.
Mileage includes gas to meetings across the watershed, approx. 1,750 miles.
Supplies include price of tablets/ipads @ $602/piece with GPS tracking.
In Kind non-federal match includes: NEST meeting attendance and representative coordination, training time for volunteer firefighters.
Confirmed Cash match includes $15,000 from California Fire Foundation & $2000 from Bella Vista Foundation to fund regional evacuation planning meeting-December 2019, Ettersburg and Honeydew project coordination, participation in Fire Safe Councils

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-MEPP-Budget.pdf

The Mattole Emergency Preparedness Planning project is in the remote Mattole River Watershed in Humboldt County, California. The entire watershed is considered part of the Wildland Urban Interface. Public lands managed by the BLM comprise 18% of the watershed. Along the western flank is the King Range National Conservation Area managed by the BLM, about half of which is within watershed boundaries. The coast is known as the Lost Coast even though it greets over 10,000 visitors annually. Fires in the area have often been started from abandoned campfires. Winds are generally strong and unpredictable. Most of the watershed is rated as either high or very high fire hazard.
Only county roads access the watershed. Highway 101 is one watershed to the east where Humboldt Redwoods State Park boasts the largest old-growth stand of redwoods in the world. There are five towns in the watershed: Petrolia, Honeydew, Ettersburg, Whitethorn and Whale Gulch. Town populations range from 250 to 600 with many rugged miles of separation and numerous far-flung neighborhoods throughout. Neighborhoods are between one and two and half hours from a year-round State fire agency. Volunteer fire departments in each town are the first responders.
Eighty four percent of the watershed is forested. Many of the privately-owned residential lands in the Mattole were formerly owned either by industrial timber companies or were a part of larger ranches. Both types removed conifer trees because of an Ad-Valorem tax that taxed standing trees until tax law changed in 1976. By 1988 over 90% of the original conifer forests had been harvested. Thick stands of second growth Douglas-fir or Redwood (<10% of the watershed) have grown back in some cases, but more common are large swaths of tanoak, the dominant hardwood accounting for approximately 50% of the forested watershed. Please note that both uploaded maps showing the location and fire hazard are one and the same.

The planning area is the Mattole watershed and its five communities. The project manager is Ali Freedlund. MRC will employ a firefighter for each community to coordinate neighborhood meetings: Jeana Herbst, a volunteer in the Ettersburg area, has been employed. An AIM award will be extend the project to Petrolia, Whitethorn and Whale Gulch. Ali will assist with larger community meetings of the project and many neighborhood meetings. John Summers and Nathan Queener of the MRC will produce the neighborhood maps and provide Atlas updates. An AIM award will purchase the necessary tablets for use in the five fire departments. MRC has successfully completed many fire planning and fuels reduction projects since our first planning effort in 2002.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Mattole-Emergency-Preparedness-Planning-Map-AIM_optimized-2.pdf

Oct ‘19
Ettersburg project presentation meeting
Nov ‘19
Smaller NEST/Atlas Update neighborhood meetings/Ettersburg
Promote project on radio/print media-include Grant awards
Advertise upcoming Evac Planning Meeting
Dec ‘19
Emergency Preparedness/Evacuation Preparedness Regional Meeting with OES, Sherriff’s Department, CAL FIRE, Volunteer Fire Departments and Companies, Lower Mattole Fire Safe Council, Residents
Honeydew NEST/Atlas meeting
Jan ‘20
Smaller NEST/Atlas Update neighborhood meetings: Ettersburg, Honeydew, Petrolia
Whitethorn project presentation meeting
Feb ‘20
Whale Gulch project presentation meeting
Smaller NEST/Atlas Update neighborhood meetings: Ettersburg, Honeydew, Petrolia, Whitethorn
March-May ‘20
Smaller NEST/Atlas Update neighborhood meetings in all areas
Digitize updates
June ‘20
Finalize Atlas updates, Print/Mail NEST lists
July ‘20
Purchase tablets, upload final Atlas
Print 5 copies Atlas
Aug ‘20
Distribute hard copies & tablets/provide training to firefighter

[268]
[269]
[270]

Planning for emergencies through a communication system that accounts for all residents in our densely forested area could prevent catastrophic loss. The process of implementing the NEST system and updating the Fire Atlas will engage hundreds of local residents in emergency planning in their neighborhoods, and increase awareness of current vulnerabilities – at homestead, neighborhood, and community scales – in the event of wildfire. We anticipate that this engagement through neighborhood meetings will lead to many residents taking further action on their own to better prepare for wildfire, such as treating defensible space or keeping alternate access routes cleared and driveable.

An updated Mattole Fire Atlas providing first responders with the best information available can shave precious minutes off of response time in an emergency. . The 2006 version of the atlas consisted of hardcopy maps in two formats: topographical and aerial imagery with additions of roads, residences, water sources, powerlines, infrastructure, etc. Though firefighters have blessedly used it many times, the difficulty of flipping through maps in a binder in an emergency is now unnecessary, and the updated maps loaded on a tablet will be much more functional and easy to use.For mention of both the Atlas and NEST in current County CWPP:

https://humboldtgov.org/DocumentCenter/View/70938/412-Mattole-Lost-Coast-Humboldt-County-CWPP-Final

See pages 4.12-7 and 4.12-21 for Atlas and 4.12-9 for NEST

MRC received a grant to hold neighborhood meetings with volunteer firefighters to enlist neighborhoods to organize into NESTs, provide defensible space education, discuss emergency preparedness and update portions of the Atlas in the communities of Ettersburg and Honeydew. The Atlas is for emergency response by our five volunteer fire departments or companies. Volunteer firefighters are our first responders. The reason for an update is to include new: roads, residences, PGE lines, and fire water resources as well as closed roads and locked gates, all needing to be verified by residents. An award from AIM would extend the project to the watershed level (3 more communities), which is our mission, and it would provide the Atlas information in an easier-to-use format, a tablet (used by our State fire agency-CAL FIRE). The tablets will have GPS tracking ability and firefighters can zoom into the area in need of response without the need for internet, which is spotty in our remote area.

The California Fire Foundation awarded $15,000 for this project in September 2019 and Bella Vista Foundation gave $2000. They constitute most of the 1:1 match in funds. With their support we have hired a volunteer firefighter with the Telegraph Ridge Volunteer Fire Company (TRVFC) to organize meetings in the Ettersburg area. Seasoned MRC staff will coordinate with her to ensure success of our objectives at the neighborhood meetings. New positions will include firefighters in Whitethorn and Whale Gulch.
MRC staff will ensure that neighborhood meetings include a volunteer firefighter. Once NESTs are organized, representatives will get to know their contacts in the fire departments. NEST representatives, neighbors and some firefighters will donate their time, the amount of which is approximately $9,500.
There are five volunteer fire departments or companies who respond in our area who will receive and be trained on the new Atlas tablet: Petrolia VFD, Honeydew VFC, Telegraph Ridge VFC, Whitethorn VFD, and Whale Gulch VFD Two hours of training 2 people in each department is quantified at $500 match.
CAL FIRE, our state fire agency, regularly participates in our planning efforts through the local Fire Safe Councils we participate in including: Lower Mattole, Southern Humboldt and Humboldt County. Many neighborhoods are adjacent to the BLM managed lands. MRC regularly communicates and participates on projects with BLM regarding risk reduction activities.

Currently there is no system of neighborhood preparedness or NEST in 3.5 of 5 communities in the watershed.
The 2006 Mattole Fire Atlas in hardcopy form needs updating with current information about homes, roads and infrastructure. The proposed project includes the purchase of 5 tablets to digitally store the atlas for ease-of-use in emergencies.
How we measure success for emergency preparedness:
Sign in sheets will quantify attendance in larger evacuation planning meeting
and neighborhood meetings
New NESTs and NEST lists annually mailed that include residents’ contact information.
NEST Representatives will have increased knowledge of neighbors’ needs and connections with volunteer firefighters.
Atlas updates will include:
Numbers of water sources available to firefighters
Numbers of roads updated either public, private, 4WD or closed
Numbers of potential safety zones
Numbers of new residences
Numbers of additions to the CWPP list of action items

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Hum-Co-LOS-AIM-MRC.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/PVFD_LetSupportAIM.pdf
Mattole Emergency Preparedness Planning
Mattole Restoration Council, 501c3
Ali Freedlund
PO Box 160
Petrolia, CA. 95558
(707) 629-3514
(707) 629-3514
ali@mattole.org
Yes

The Mattole Restoration Council (MRC), founded in 1983, works to improve the resiliency of our natural systems and human communities in the Mattole River watershed in coastal northern California. MRC works with hundreds of private landowners, state and federal agencies, local volunteer fire departments, and other conservation and education organizations. We began by focusing on the restoration of our native salmon runs. Today, MRC is actively working on riparian planting, grasslands restoration, sustainable forest management, public outreach, ecological education in the local public schools, water conservation, and hazardous fuels reduction. Our efforts fit under the following programs: Native Ecosystem Restoration, Working Lands and Human Communities, and Education and Outreach. Our staff includes 5 full time, 6 part-time and up to 30 seasonal employees that work on projects.

Planning

To help prevent wildfire impacts, this proposal by the Mattole Restoration Council (MRC) aims to empower residents in emergency preparedness and provide an updated atlas of maps to our volunteer fire departments. To do this we will:
1) Hold one regional evacuation planning meeting in collaboration with: Office of Emergency Services, County Sheriff, CAL-FIRE, Volunteer Fire Departments, Fire Safe Councils, and residents.
2) Hold approximately 50 neighborhood meetings with the dual purpose of forming Neighborhood Emergency Service Teams (NESTs) and updating neighborhood maps for the Mattole Fire Atlas to increase the effectiveness of emergency responders and each other’s knowledge of evacuation routes and challenges.
3) Involve volunteer firefighters at each neighborhood meeting to get to know representatives and hear about risks and challenges residents face in evacuation as well as safety concerns for first responders along access routes.
4) Prioritize access roads for future fuels treatment.
5) Update Mattole Fire Atlas on GIS from information gathered at meetings, ranking accessibility for firefighters.
6) Distribute Atlas in hardcopy and on tablets/Ipads to each of the 5 volunteer fire departments in our watershed.
7) Print and mail new NEST lists in the 5 areas.

Yes

This project will gather information from across privately-owned residential areas in the watershed to help neighborhoods plan and prepare for emergencies, and provide first responders with updated and easy-to-use maps on tablets. Neighborhood meetings are essential in setting up a system of communication for emergencies. In Petrolia there are 16 NESTs therefore 16 meetings. We project 10 NESTs in Honeydew, 10 in Ettersburg, 15 in Whitethorn and 5 in Whale Gulch for a potential of 56. Getting neighbors acquainted and understanding their needs/challenges in an evacuation and assigning a point person to interface with first responders could be life-saving.
Through neighborhood updates to the Mattole Fire Atlas, an important resource for volunteer fire departments since 2006, access roads will be ranked for future treatments. Once neighborhoods are organized (NESTs) and maps are updated and distributed, both residents and firefighters will have improved tools and processes in an emergency

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Mattole-Emergency-Preparedness-Planning-Map-AIM_optimized-3-1.pdf

The Mattole watershed lies between BLM lands and the largest old-growth redwood forest at Humboldt Redwoods State Park. Town populations in the watershed range from 250 to 600 with many rugged miles of separation. Volunteer firefighters are our first responders. Most neighborhoods are accessed via unpaved road systems packed with dense fuels. With AIM funding, MRC will be able to complete the entire Mattole Fire Atlas update and help organize neighborhoods into NESTs for emergency preparedness.

Yes
http://www.mattole.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/LM_CWPP_2016FINAL.pdf
Yes

Personnel includes: coordinating larger community meetings, conducting neighborhood meetings, GIS mapmaking for neighborhood maps and Atlas updates, project communications, training firefighters on the use of tablets.
Mileage includes gas to meetings across the watershed, approx. 1,750 miles.
Supplies include price of tablets/ipads @ $602/piece with GPS tracking.
In Kind non-federal match includes: NEST meeting attendance and representative coordination, training time for volunteer firefighters.
Confirmed Cash match includes $15,000 from California Fire Foundation & $2000 from Bella Vista Foundation to fund regional evacuation planning meeting-December 2019, Ettersburg and Honeydew project coordination, participation in Fire Safe Councils

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-MEPP-Budget-1.pdf

The Mattole Emergency Preparedness Planning project is in the remote Mattole River Watershed in Humboldt County, California. The entire watershed is considered part of the Wildland Urban Interface. Public lands managed by the BLM comprise 18% of the watershed. Along the western flank is the King Range National Conservation Area managed by the BLM, about half of which is within watershed boundaries. The coast is known as the Lost Coast even though it greets over 10,000 visitors annually. Fires in the area have often been started from abandoned campfires. Winds are generally strong and unpredictable. Most of the watershed is rated as either high or very high fire hazard.
Only county roads access the watershed. Highway 101 is one watershed to the east where Humboldt Redwoods State Park boasts the largest old-growth stand of redwoods in the world. There are five towns in the watershed: Petrolia, Honeydew, Ettersburg, Whitethorn and Whale Gulch. Town populations range from 250 to 600 with many rugged miles of separation and numerous far-flung neighborhoods throughout. Neighborhoods are between one and two and half hours from a year-round State fire agency. Volunteer fire departments in each town are the first responders.
Eighty four percent of the watershed is forested. Many of the privately-owned residential lands in the Mattole were formerly owned either by industrial timber companies or were a part of larger ranches. Both types removed conifer trees because of an Ad-Valorem tax that taxed standing trees until tax law changed in 1976. By 1988 over 90% of the original conifer forests had been harvested. Thick stands of second growth Douglas-fir or Redwood (<10% of the watershed) have grown back in some cases, but more common are large swaths of tanoak, the dominant hardwood accounting for approximately 50% of the forested watershed. Please note that both uploaded maps showing the location and fire hazard are one and the same.

The planning area is the Mattole watershed and its five communities. The project manager is Ali Freedlund. MRC will employ a firefighter for each community to coordinate neighborhood meetings: Jeana Herbst, a volunteer in the Ettersburg area, has been employed. An AIM award will be extend the project to Petrolia, Whitethorn and Whale Gulch. Ali will assist with larger community meetings of the project and many neighborhood meetings. John Summers and Nathan Queener of the MRC will produce the neighborhood maps and provide Atlas updates. An AIM award will purchase the necessary tablets for use in the five fire departments. MRC has successfully completed many fire planning and fuels reduction projects since our first planning effort in 2002.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Mattole-Emergency-Preparedness-Planning-Map-AIM_optimized-2-1.pdf

Oct ‘19
Ettersburg project presentation meeting
Nov ‘19
Smaller NEST/Atlas Update neighborhood meetings/Ettersburg
Promote project on radio/print media-include Grant awards
Advertise upcoming Evac Planning Meeting
Dec ‘19
Emergency Preparedness/Evacuation Preparedness Regional Meeting with OES, Sherriff’s Department, CAL FIRE, Volunteer Fire Departments and Companies, Lower Mattole Fire Safe Council, Residents
Honeydew NEST/Atlas meeting
Jan ‘20
Smaller NEST/Atlas Update neighborhood meetings: Ettersburg, Honeydew, Petrolia
Whitethorn project presentation meeting
Feb ‘20
Whale Gulch project presentation meeting
Smaller NEST/Atlas Update neighborhood meetings: Ettersburg, Honeydew, Petrolia, Whitethorn
March-May ‘20
Smaller NEST/Atlas Update neighborhood meetings in all areas
Digitize updates
June ‘20
Finalize Atlas updates, Print/Mail NEST lists
July ‘20
Purchase tablets, upload final Atlas
Print 5 copies Atlas
Aug ‘20
Distribute hard copies & tablets/provide training to firefighter

[268]
[269]
[270]

Planning for emergencies through a communication system that accounts for all residents in our densely forested area could prevent catastrophic loss. The process of implementing the NEST system and updating the Fire Atlas will engage hundreds of local residents in emergency planning in their neighborhoods, and increase awareness of current vulnerabilities – at homestead, neighborhood, and community scales – in the event of wildfire. We anticipate that this engagement through neighborhood meetings will lead to many residents taking further action on their own to better prepare for wildfire, such as treating defensible space or keeping alternate access routes cleared and driveable.

An updated Mattole Fire Atlas providing first responders with the best information available can shave precious minutes off of response time in an emergency. . The 2006 version of the atlas consisted of hardcopy maps in two formats: topographical and aerial imagery with additions of roads, residences, water sources, powerlines, infrastructure, etc. Though firefighters have blessedly used it many times, the difficulty of flipping through maps in a binder in an emergency is now unnecessary, and the updated maps loaded on a tablet will be much more functional and easy to use.For mention of both the Atlas and NEST in current County CWPP:

https://humboldtgov.org/DocumentCenter/View/70938/412-Mattole-Lost-Coast-Humboldt-County-CWPP-Final

See pages 4.12-7 and 4.12-21 for Atlas and 4.12-9 for NEST

MRC received a grant to hold neighborhood meetings with volunteer firefighters to enlist neighborhoods to organize into NESTs, provide defensible space education, discuss emergency preparedness and update portions of the Atlas in the communities of Ettersburg and Honeydew. The Atlas is for emergency response by our five volunteer fire departments or companies. Volunteer firefighters are our first responders. The reason for an update is to include new: roads, residences, PGE lines, and fire water resources as well as closed roads and locked gates, all needing to be verified by residents. An award from AIM would extend the project to the watershed level (3 more communities), which is our mission, and it would provide the Atlas information in an easier-to-use format, a tablet (used by our State fire agency-CAL FIRE). The tablets will have GPS tracking ability and firefighters can zoom into the area in need of response without the need for internet, which is spotty in our remote area.

The California Fire Foundation awarded $15,000 for this project in September 2019 and Bella Vista Foundation gave $2000. They constitute most of the 1:1 match in funds. With their support we have hired a volunteer firefighter with the Telegraph Ridge Volunteer Fire Company (TRVFC) to organize meetings in the Ettersburg area. Seasoned MRC staff will coordinate with her to ensure success of our objectives at the neighborhood meetings. New positions will include firefighters in Whitethorn and Whale Gulch.
MRC staff will ensure that neighborhood meetings include a volunteer firefighter. Once NESTs are organized, representatives will get to know their contacts in the fire departments. NEST representatives, neighbors and some firefighters will donate their time, the amount of which is approximately $9,500.
There are five volunteer fire departments or companies who respond in our area who will receive and be trained on the new Atlas tablet: Petrolia VFD, Honeydew VFC, Telegraph Ridge VFC, Whitethorn VFD, and Whale Gulch VFD Two hours of training 2 people in each department is quantified at $500 match.
CAL FIRE, our state fire agency, regularly participates in our planning efforts through the local Fire Safe Councils we participate in including: Lower Mattole, Southern Humboldt and Humboldt County. Many neighborhoods are adjacent to the BLM managed lands. MRC regularly communicates and participates on projects with BLM regarding risk reduction activities.

Currently there is no system of neighborhood preparedness or NEST in 3.5 of 5 communities in the watershed.
The 2006 Mattole Fire Atlas in hardcopy form needs updating with current information about homes, roads and infrastructure. The proposed project includes the purchase of 5 tablets to digitally store the atlas for ease-of-use in emergencies.
How we measure success for emergency preparedness:
Sign in sheets will quantify attendance in larger evacuation planning meeting
and neighborhood meetings
New NESTs and NEST lists annually mailed that include residents’ contact information.
NEST Representatives will have increased knowledge of neighbors’ needs and connections with volunteer firefighters.
Atlas updates will include:
Numbers of water sources available to firefighters
Numbers of roads updated either public, private, 4WD or closed
Numbers of potential safety zones
Numbers of new residences
Numbers of additions to the CWPP list of action items

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Hum-Co-LOS-AIM-MRC-1.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/PVFD_LetSupportAIM-1.pdf
Burney-Hat Creek Forest Restoration Planning Tool and Data Program – Lidar Data Processing and Use for Project Level Planning
Sacramento River Watershed Program (SRWP)
Holly Jorgensen
2233 Nord Avenue
Chico, CA 95926
5307812220
5307812220
holly@sacriver.org
Yes

The SRWP provides a network for building a basin-wide context to improve watershed and forest health. It operates through consensus-based collaborative partnerships, coordination of research and monitoring, and enhancing mutual education among Sacramento River Watershed (SRW) stakeholders. The SRWP develops partnerships, identifies opportunities, and convenes stakeholders to advance planning and implementation efforts throughout the SRW by identifying shared values among multiple perspectives. The Sacramento River Watershed Data Program (SRWDP) engages stakeholders on a web-based platform to gather information about forest conditions, key infrastructure, priorities, projects and more. The SRWDP works with partners to gather and display data and information in an easy to understand watershed view of forest conditions and management activities. Data is managed at the local level and utilized for strategic landscape-level planning and implementation of forest health improvements.

Personnel Capacity, Planning

The Burney-Hat Creek Forest Restoration Planning Tool and Data Program will support the Burney-Hat Creek Community Forest and Watershed Group (BHCCFWG) with strategic planning and project implementation to increase the pace and scale of fuels reduction and forest restoration in a landscape of approximately 500,000 acres. The Planning Tool currently used by the collaborative provides stakeholders with a comprehensive data repository, an interactive GIS platform, document catalogs, and custom project workspaces that can host site-level data and information. We are asking for funding to develop a LiDAR data portion of this program for the region and for the development of LiDAR aided products to enhance collaborative planning and prioritization to strategically implement forest health projects objectives currently underway. LiDAR data and fine-scale data products proposed here provide an accurate, up-to-date inventory of landscape features, ecological communities and habitats. These foundational data sets are key to facilitating good planning and management for watershed protection, flood control, fire and fuels management and wildlife habitat conservation. These data are also critical to assessing climate mitigation and adaptation strategies and benefits provided by the landscape, such as the amount of carbon sequestered in forests. This project will support this effort by adding important data and information to make accurate decisions.

Yes

Forest restoration and management should be implemented strategically at the landscape-level to reduce wildfire risk and improve forest health. Implementing restoration efforts across the landscape is more effective than isolated restoration projects and yields multiple watershed benefits. Collaborative landscape level restoration and adaptive management are recognized as the mechanism for accelerating the pace and scale of forest restoration. Involving diverse stakeholders in the planning, implementation and monitoring of projects encourages investment by all participants, which in turn facilitates implementation. Numerous assessments of the challenges, needs, and opportunities for advancing strategically planned landscape level fire prevention efforts identify accessible data and information as a dominant need. This project will create a shared understanding of conditions, objectives and management efforts critical for effective management across the watershed and state.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Burney-Hat-Creek-CFLR-Risk-Map.pdf

The area contains a high density of environmental, economic, and cultural values that are at risk of degradation from high severity wildfire. The towns of Burney, Hat Creek, and Cassel are situated in the WUI, presenting substantial risk to life and property. The region’s economy is heavily reliant on outdoor tourism and timber, and a large forest-replacing fire would have severe and lasting economic impacts. At risk are also Pit River Tribe cultural sites and unique ecological communities.

Yes
https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/80da86_316fef62def648a8b040399b4013e679.pdf
Yes, No

LiDAR data for this area is in a format that is very difficult to manage. File sizes are in the terabytes and stakeholders do not have the capacity to use the data at the project level. This project will use grant proceeds to process and prepare data products (labor and data computing time) to make data available for web use by region stakeholders. Matching funds will come from CalFire collaborative efforts for data activities and labor.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-7.pdf

Successful fire suppression activities combined with historic fuel modification for the past eighty years have significantly increased the volume of vegetation across the landscape, resulting in High to Very High Fire Hazard Severity Ratings by the CAL FIRE. The USDA Forest Service (USFS) rates the HCV-FSCA as an extreme wildfire zone. Vegetation in the area is characterized by seven vegetation types: Douglas-fir-Mixed Conifer Forest, Mixed Conifer, Ponderosa Pine, Canyon Live Oak Woodland, Black Oak Woodland, Gray Pine Woodland, and Chaparral. Elevation ranges for these vegetation types are between 3,182 feet at Rock Spring on the valley floor and 7,863 at Burney Mountain. Fuels reduction projects for the area attain a high priority because the area is surrounded by the Lassen National Forest on all sides, located near areas where major large fires have occurred in the past, adjacent to communities, and is surrounded by vegetation on Forest Service land that has the highest fire hazard risk rating given by the USFS and CAL FIRE.

The team of data scientists, GIS experts and ecologists will work with stakeholders (stakeholder participation 40 hours) to develop and refine a workflow for processing LiDAR data and the creation of forest structure products, including EcObject, outlined above. The workflow utilizes FUSION/LDV and USFS Remote Sensing Lab preliminary EcObject processing scripts (developed in Python3). This includes data management and processing (40 hours), workflow automation (80-100 hours), and secondary and tertiary product development (80 hours). Our software team will be responsible for developing custom web-based data platforms that will host the output for use by stakeholders (150 hours). Computing time (4 weeks).

No equipment purchase required. All required software licenses and computing time is provided as match for this project.

N/A

LiDAR data products and EcObject outputs can provide resources for project planning, scoping, tree marking, implementation as fully documented here: https://buttecounty.opennrm.org/assets/e106ca2a359a122e74e33ef183a0fb4a/application/pdf/EcObjectProductGuide_Final_V1.pdf. The capacity for LiDAR will aid the CWPP, hazard plan, and current CCI grant-funded fuels reduction projects ready for detailed treatment planning. SRWP and 34 North are currently working on similar projects for Butte County, Yuba County, and Shasta. Many projects in the Burney area are large scale fuels reduction on federal and private land. This effort will support the CFLR that can implement large scale projects and ultimately reduce risk to the WUI and CWPP.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Burney-Hat-Creek-Fuels-and-Restoration-Projects.pdf

The LiDAR acquisition was made in 2015 and the project group has data and is ready to begin processing. This project will take approximately 6- 8 months. We anticipate 2-4 months of implementation to set up a workflow, generate primary and secondary products. Tertiary products will require synthesis with risk data, vegetation mapping, remote sensing and other data that will need participation from the collaboration. This step will add 30 -60 days for comprehensive feedback and product development. Preparing data for web delivery is ongoing and will be implemented for the entire period of the project.

[268]
[269]
[270]

LiDAR data is available in various areas throughout the State provides and can provide project support like no other dataset. Fire prevention and forest health restoration efforts including the Lake Tahoe West Restoration Partnership and Sonoma County Forest Conservation Working Group have made significant progress and are far ahead of other forest planning and restoration efforts as a result of utilizing LiDAR data. Accurate forest inventories are required to assess the composition, structure, and distribution of forest vegetation that, in turn, can be used as base information for management decisions that span across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Using LiDAR data will allow stakeholders to meet a wider range of forest inventory information needs. As an example, height estimates generated from airborne remotely sensed LiDAR data were found to be of similar, or better accuracy than corresponding field-based estimates and studies have demonstrated that the LiDAR measurement error for individual tree height (of a given species) is less than 1.0 m and less than 0.5 m for plot-based estimates of maximum and mean canopy height with full canopy closure. This level of accuracy will help to ensure that strategic planning and restoration efforts area based on the best available science to inform local, regional, and state objectives.

In the West, protecting our communities and natural resources from catastrophic fire is a top priority. A new poll conducted by the Public Policy Institute of California reveals that Californians’ concerns about worsening wildfires is at a record high. Organizations, agencies, and other groups are working to prevent devastating wildfires, but the majority of California’s forests are in need of active management and contain unprecedented fuel loads. Overstocked, unhealthy forests are vulnerable to catastrophic fire, insects and disease, which directly threaten our fish, wildlife and watersheds. With limited resources, it is critical that we cooperatively and strategically plan and implement forest health improvement projects and programs. Data and information is key to successfully coordinating our efforts. This project will significantly improve Northern California’s ability to assess a high-risk area and collectively develop programs and projects using the best available science.

The following organizations are all involved in the project planning, evaluation, and implementation process and committed to project success. Each member will be involved in the review of data and products for project use. This project is part of the collaborative’s planning needs assessment and each will donate time to make this data component a key resource in the planning efforts. Organizations include: Burney Hat Creek Community Forest and Watershed Group (review/technical), Burney Fire Department (review), Cal Trout (review), CAL FIRE (technical), Consulting Foresters, Fall River Conservancy (technical), Fall River RCD Conservation District , Fruit Growers Supply, Hat Creek Fire Safe Council (review), Hat Creek Ranger District (USFS) (technical and data provider), Lassen Forest Preservation, Lassen National Park (technical), McAurthur-Burney Falls State Park, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Pit River Tribe, Sierra Nevada Conservancy, Sierra Pacific Industries, Stewardship Council, and Tubit Enterprises (review).

The Burney area has scoped over a million acres in need of restoration, reforestation. and fuel reduction activity. The LiDAR program will provide the data, tools, and assessment needed to increase the pace and scale of project scoping, planning and implementation. The program will reduce the dependence on USFS capacity to conduct extensive field surveys. USFS and USGS are conducting flights for the National Map which will provide additional LiDAR for the entire region. This project will set up the workflow and capacity to use new LiDAR at all levels as the data become available in 2020. Strategically planned programs and projects will increase both the pace and scale of forest restoration by identifying and addressing prioritized areas and treatments. The resulting implementation efforts will treat larger areas of the landscape and increase the region’s wildfire resiliency.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/COCO_AIM_BHCCFWG_LOS_11Oct2019.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/COCO_AIM_USDA_SRWP_LOS.pdf
Northeast Minnesota Wildfire Mitigation and Outreach Capacity Building
Lake County and Cook County
Todd Armbruster
411 W 2nd Street
Grand Marais/Minnesota/55604
218-387-3646
2182350899
toddarmbrust@gmail.com
Yes

Cook County Firewise began as a committee of local, state, and federal agencies, property owners, and volunteer fire departments in 1999. Lake County followed with a similar organization in 2000 after a massive windstorm event. These two counties cover over 6,000 square miles in northeast Minnesota including the Superior National Forest and Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Since 2011, each county has contracted with a part-time Firewise Coordinator under the direction of the Emergency Management Director. The coordinator plans and implements programs such as: fuels reduction projects, home ignition zone assessments, chipper/brush pick up days, community outreach, and FEMA pre-disaster mitigation grants among others. In 2017, one contractor was hired by both counties in an attempt to improve regional project synergy and create full-time work for the Firewise Coordinator while incorporating Fire Adapted Community principles.

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Planning

Northeast Minnesota experiences a seasonal population swell from late May through September. As wildfire awareness increases and programs continue to grow, so does the demand for personnel. This is especially true during the short summer season where seasonal residents, weekend get-away cabin owners, and vacationers arrive in the area. In order to meet this growing demand for wildfire awareness and mitigation activities, a seasonal internship is necessary. Vermilion Community College is a local institution offering an associate’s degree program in natural resources that includes an internship as part of the degree requirements. A summer internship will benefit both counties’ wildfire programs by providing capacity to help manage fuels reduction contracts and brush pick up days, complete home ignition zone evaluations, attend community outreach events, and launch a neighborhood ambassador program. This internship will provide an excellent opportunity for a student to experience on the ground wildfire mitigation projects and the social aspects of wildfire while working with property owners. Objectives:
-Assist in launching a neighborhood ambassador program.
-Assist with property owner site visits and implementing hazardous fuels reduction grant projects.
-Coordinate neighborhood brush pick up days.
-Conduct home ignition zone evaluations with property owners.
-Attend community outreach events and property owner association meetings to promote Fire Adapted Community principles.

Yes

A large majority of ownership in Lake(80%) and Cook(90%) County is public land. Working with our federal, state, and tribal partners is critical in achieving wildfire mitigation on a landscape scale. The majority of our wildland urban interface is on private land but also extends onto federal and state land. The forest service is working side by side with the counties to reduce fuels on adjacent federal land through understory fuels reduction, thinning, commercial harvesting, and prescribed fire. Together we are partnering with all agencies to identify and mitigate adjacent properties to achieve strategic fuels reduction efforts across ownership boundaries. All partners are focusing on wildland urban intermix areas including ingress/egress routes since the majority of roads in this area have one way in/out. Beyond wildfire risk, this work addresses agency priorities such as: improved moose habitat, white pine regeneration, and blueberry plant regeneration.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Arrowhead_RiskAssessment_WildfireRisk.pdf

This area is considered a priority for mitigation actions due to the close proximity of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Wildfires in the wilderness area have the potential to intensify quickly and spread into the wildland urban interface which occurred twice in the past decade. The values at risk lie just outside of the wilderness area and make up the livelihood of this tourism-based area. Some examples include: canoe outfitters, resorts, private cabins, and restaurants.

Yes
https://www.co.cook.mn.us/index.php/emergency-management-plans%20%20%20%20%20-%20%20%20%20%20%20https://www.co.lake.mn.us/departments/emergency_management/plans.php
Yes

These funds will be allocated to support a natural resources internship that will assist the Firewise Coordinator in planning and implementing wildfire outreach and mitigation projects. The current rate for college interns is $12-15 per hour. Since the area covers over 6,000 square miles and a personal vehicle will be used, we will allocate a portion of the award towards mileage reimbursement. Both in-kind and cash match will be tracked from individual homeowners as well as homeowners associations who work with us on wildfire grant projects. We have approximately $330,000 of federal mitigation funding contracted for fuels reduction work and homeowner incentive programs that the intern will assist with managing in 2020.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-9.pdf

Our outreach efforts cover the entire area of Lake and Cook County while mitigation efforts focus on the highest risk areas. High risk areas are located adjacent to the one million acre Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and comprise wildland urban intermix areas with scattered structures. Vegetation types in this area are dominated by birch, aspen, spruce, balsam fir, red pine, and white pine. Areas that blew down in the 1999 windstorm are regenerating to very thick balsam fir. Mixed conifer areas that did not blow down are in a state of decline, with a heavy understory of balsam fir. Many remaining red and white pine stands also contain a heavy amount of balsam fir regeneration in the understory. Furthermore, the spruce budworm has infested many high risk areas of Lake County and is moving east towards Cook County. This native pest feeds primarily on balsam fir and after several years of feeding kills the tree. Now there are thousands of acres of dead standing balsam fir in the highest risk areas of Lake County, making them even more susceptible catastrophic wildfire. Map attached.

We anticipate this person will work nearly 500 hours next season, or more if their schedule allows. This position will directly impact our on the ground mitigation projects and property owner engagement assisting the Firewise Coordinator. We have approximately $330,000 of mitigation funding with projects in various stages spread across two counties. Time will be spent in these areas: meeting with property owners at their home to evaluate defensible space and set up mitigation projects, creating bid packages for contractors, laying out mitigation projects, overseeing contractor work, meeting with homeowner associations, assisting with the launch of a neighborhood ambassador program and coordinating neighborhood incentive projects.

Although we aren’t requesting fuels reduction funding, this position will assist with all aspects of fuels reduction mitigation projects on approximately 100 acres.

Although we aren’t requesting funding for planning efforts, this position will assist with launching a neighborhood ambassador program in both counties and provide educational outreach at community events and homeowner association meetings.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Project_Overview_Map.pdf

January: The Firewise Coordinator will attend a career information day for students at Vermilion Community College to begin recruiting an intern.
February-April: The Firewise Coordinator and County Emergency Managers will hire an intern, organize projects and specific tasks for the summer internship.
May: Internship begins with training and shadowing the Firewise Coordinator.
June-August: Intern assists the Firewise Coordinator with mitigation projects and educational outreach, often working independently.
September: Finalize reports and cost share tracking for summer internship .
Major milestones for this project include: conducting 20 on-site meetings with private property owners for fuels mitigation projects, attending four homeowner association meetings to promote fire adapted communities principles, attending three community events for wildfire educational outreach, assisting with launching a neighborhood ambassador program and signing up five ambassadors in each county.

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Increasing the capacity of our program during the short window of summer we experience will increase on the ground wildfire mitigation action in several ways. First, having two people available to meet with property owners for defensible space evaluations and fuels reduction projects will improve the speed in which mitigation contracts can be awarded and implemented. Second, having two people available to attend homeowner association meetings and community events will improve outreach efforts that promote our grant programs and spur homeowner action. Moreover, having someone help launch a neighborhood ambassador program will lead to long-term commitments from communities to address wildfire risk and create a pool of volunteers to help spread the message of fire adapted communities. Finally, increased personnel capacity will help build the programs of both counties and eventually warrant two full-time coordinators in order to sustain and continue growing these programs.

We are requesting funding ultimately to grow our programs. Since our window for outreach to seasonal residents and snow free period for conducting mitigation work is so short, we have to move quickly during the summer months. Community outreach is critical for building a robust program and taking it to the next level. In order to cover 6,000 square miles of territory, more than one person is needed to engage with all these communities during the busy summer season. Currently there isn’t sufficient work in the winter months to justify two full-time coordinators. By increasing our capacity we can demonstrate to county and agency partners that two full-time coordinators will eventually be needed. This will help them realize the importance of the coordinator position and find ways to fund another coordinator over the long term or explore creating a regional coalition.

Both counties have community wildfire protection plan committees that meet monthly and have existed for nearly 20 years. These committees consist of private citizens, volunteer fire departments, county staff and officials, state, federal, and tribal representatives. All partners contribute by attending these meetings and providing input on grant projects. The counties act as fiscal agents for grant funding, provide administrative support for projects, hire the Coordinator who reports to the Emergency Manager, and provide Secure Rural Schools Title III funding to employ a Coordinator. The state provides grants for homeowner incentive programs such as brush pick up days, defensible space work, and funds to manage community brush disposal sites. The forest service provides technical expertise, funding for hazardous fuels reduction grant projects, and burning our community brush disposal sites each year. Private citizens and volunteer fire departments assist with outreach and organizing communities around wildfire mitigation programs.

We will measure the short-term success of the project through these metrics: tracking the number of property owner site visits, mitigation acres treated, number of brush pick-ups completed, cubic yards of material in our community brush disposal sites, in-kind hours and cash match collected, number of homeowner meetings attended, number of community events attended, and the number of people trained as neighborhood ambassadors. The long-term success of this project will be measured by the comparison of short-term metrics year over year and the ability to hire two full-time coordinators. Additional long-term success will be tracked through before and after photos of project areas and attracting additional funding sources to grow the program. One final long-term success metric will be the number of neighborhood ambassadors we have engaged each year to help promote and sustain our programs. On the ground wildfire risk reduction activities can be tracked using the short-term metrics.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/USFS-Letter-of-Support.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Lake-County-Letter.pdf
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Service-Agreement-Poplar-II-Hazardous-Fuel-Reduction-Project-TNT-and-Upcountry-Landworks.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Service-Agreement-Poplar-II-Hazardous-Fuel-Reduction-Project-Nesgoda-Services-LLP.pdfADAFAC Wildland Fuel Mitigation and Utilization
Boise Fire Department (municipal fire department)
Jerry McAdams (Wildfire Mitigation Specialist) & Julie Bryson (Grants Specialist)
333 N Mark Stall Place
Boise, ID 8374-0644
208-570-6500
208-570-6553
jbryson@cityofboise.org
Yes

The Boise Fire Department, founded in 1876, is an all-career, all-hazards department of the City of Boise. Currently, the Boise Fire Department has 288 full-time employees, 17 fire stations, a hazardous materials team, ARFF team, dive team, a technical rescue team and a Wildfire Division. The Boise Fire Department provides contract for services with three neighboring fire districts, and serves a population of approximately 225,000 residents within approximately 130 square miles. Our designated wildland-urban interface (WUI) encompasses 32,005 acres. There are 11,191 parcels in this designated WUI. The Wildfire Division actively engages with, and leads, other city departments on a City of Boise Wildfire Mitigation Team, as well as initiating and facilitating a countywide Ada Fire Adapted Working Group of various stakeholder groups, including governmental and non-governmental organizations.

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Equipment Purchase

The City of Boise WMT, and our area partners, are looking to bolster effective and ecologically sound fuel mitigation practices. We have well established partnerships, but we are lacking in various equipment and capacity to mitigate fuels without the increased cost of hiring contractors.

Personnel:
We are requesting $10,000 grant funding for an additional 8-month, part-time seasonal fuel crew member. Boise Fire has annual budgeted funding for a 4-month, full-time intern position that we are rescoping into an 8-month, part-time seasonal fuel crew position. This position will be paired up with a similar employee in Parks and one or both positions will act as in-kind, staff-time match toward this grant, along with additional supervisory staff-time.

Equipment:
We are requesting $40,000 in grant funding to help purchase a mobile air-curtain burner. Total quoted cost for the burner is $66,068 with delivery and training included. The City of Boise will be purchasing a $90k slope-mower, with city funds, to create fuel breaks and conduct mastication in certain areas. The purchase of the mower will act as cash match toward this grant. We will realize savings on the slope-mower purchase, utilizing $26,068 of this savings as additional cash match toward the purchase of an air-curtain burner.

Objectives:
1) Reduce hazardous fuels in target areas
2) Increase our capacity to conduct wildfire mitigation
3) Remove and utilize woody biomass, with low emissions
4) Share best practices

Yes

We are called to be good stewards of our public lands. A https://airburners.com/products/burnboss/ mobile air-curtain burner will allow us to more effectively manage hazardous and invasive vegetation on the over 5,200 acres of City of Boise managed open space reserves, including those areas that abut federal lands. This will ultimately lead to increased safety for recreationists, homeowners and firefighters, as well as cleaner air, all of which is very important to stakeholders in the City of Boise and Ada County. There are areas in our wildland-urban interface where prescribed (Rx) fire is just not an option and pile burning would create smoke issues for residents (e.g. riparian areas). A BurnBoss will allow for disposal of large amounts of hazardous and invasive wildland vegetation with very low emissions, and with the residual benefit of useful biochar. The BurnBoss will also be utilized by our area partners facing similar issues on public lands.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Hazard-Map-Federal-Land-150×150.jpg

There are numerous values at risk in our over 32,000 acres of wildland-urban interface, including 11,000+ parcels, over 7,000 homes, watersheds, critical wildlife habitat, endangered plant species, critical infrastructure (e.g. powerlines, hospitals, etc.), and over 190 miles of recreational trails, which are utilized by patrons from the entire county and beyond. In particular, post-fire debris flow potential is a real consideration in our watershed http://bit.ly/PotBoiledOver .

Yes

Yes

Grant Funds:
– $40,000 – equipment purchase of a towable, mobile air-curtain incinerator
– $10,000 – staffing to hire an additional part-time, seasonal fuels crewmember
Match:
– $122,000 in equipment funding has been made available to match this request
– $10,000 in-kind, staff-time match for a part-time, temporary, season fuels crewmember
– $8,000 additional in-kind, staff-time match for fuels mitigation

The City of Boise WMT will be involved in determining locations and materials for removal, along with other partners and stakeholders. This grant and proposed budget have been submitted to and approved by our City of Boise Grant Review Committee

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable_BoiseFire2.pdf

As wildfire is one of the top ranked hazards in Ada County, we seek to fulfill our distinct duty to mitigate this risk and manage our open spaces in an ecologically appropriate manner. Our project area will be high hazard areas on City of Boise managed open space in Ada County, which encompass more than 5,200 acres. An updated Ada County Wildfire Riskmap project, completed in 2015 and incorporated into our Intterra-based Ada Situational Awareness Tool (ASAT), will help inform our decision making for mitigating higher hazard areas. There are several specific areas of concern that are in dire need of woody biomass removal and utilization, such as the Hulls Gulch Reserve, Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve and the Boise River corridor. Other public lands will also be targeted for mitigation in cooperation with our partners and stakeholders in Ada County and Boise County.

Regarding area-wide planning for landscape-scale mitigation, this project meets goals and initiatives outlined in the Idaho Forest Action Plan, Ada County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan (also serving as our CWPP), Blueprint Boise (City of Boise Comprehensive Plan), the City of Boise Reserves Management Plan, along with the City of Boise Wildfire Mitigation Strategic Plan (in final stage of editing). The project also meets the intent of all three goals of the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy – (1) Resilient Landscapes, (2) Fire Adapted Communities and (3) Effective Response.

By accepting this grant proposal, you will help the City of Boise and our partners in Ada County and Boise County more efficiently deal with woody biomass removal and utilization in an ecologically appropriate manner. We look forward to a new partnership with Coalitions & Collaboratives, Inc. and with sharing our successes moving forward.

With this grant we will hire an additional 19-hour/week seasonal employee for approximately 8-months, to work alongside two other seasonal employees, one from Fire and one from Parks (currently funded positions). These individuals will comprise the City of Boise Wildfire Mitigation Team Fuels Crew. They will run our slope-mower, chainsaws, chippers, weed trimmers and an air-curtain burner for removal and utilization of wildland fuels throughout the City of Boise, as well as Ada County and Boise County. These crewmembers will be trained and managed by Jerry McAdams, Wildfire Mitigation Specialist (Fire) and Martha Brabec, Restoration Ecologist (Parks).

With this grant we will be adding a unique and much needed piece of equipment, which none of our area partners currently have. A mobile, air-curtain burner will allow us to make better use of time, reduce emissions and significantly remove and reduce hazardous and invasive woody biomass and reclaim the biochar (ash), which can used as a soil amendment in our Firewise Demonstration Gardens and other areas.

Fuel treatments will be on-going, with the use of staff from Boise Parks and Boise Fire. The City of Boise is putting more effort into fuel mitigation and modifications on city managed open space. This will include slope-mowing, mastication, chipping, sawyer work, Rx fire (where appropriate), as well as burning of woody debris (e.g. pile-burning or air-curtain burning). Ongoing project work will be completed on several hundreds of acres of open space utilizing best practices.

Projects tied to the initiatives in the Ada County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan will be updated and new initiative will be formulated based on best available data moving forward. The availability of an air-curtain burner for woody biomass removal and utilization will likely inform other partners initiatives regarding clean air, debris removal, etc., as well as informing updates to other previously mentioned planning documents.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Priority-Areas.pdf

November/December 2019:
– Draft specific projects documents for prescriptive fuels mitigation projects
– Purchase a slope-mower and air-curtain burner (if grant funded)
– Work with HR to rescope current intern position to an 8-month, part-time, seasonal
– Advertise seasonal positions

January/February 2020:
– Interview for seasonal staff

March 2020
– Onboarding of seasonal staff to include training on equipment
– Project work will begin to take place through October 2020

We will continue with project scoping on an annual basis and hiring seasonals May – October each year. Data gathering will take place as projects occur. Monitoring will be set up at different intervals depending upon type of treatment and location. Deliverables and summaries will be provided to Coalitions & Collaborative, Inc. on time. The City of Boise WMT and City of Boise IT staff will keep our partner website www.adafireadapted.org updated with projects and opportunities as they occur.

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These wildfire mitigation projects will be implemented on public lands managed by the City of Boise, as well as other public lands owned by various entities that belong to our Ada Fire Adapted (ADAFAC) Working Group. Many of these targeted properties are adjacent to lands that are managed by our federal partners, the Bureau of Land Management and the USDA Forest Service. These areas have been identified as priority areas in multiple aforementioned planning documents. Specifically, ongoing fuel mitigation efforts will meet initiatives in our Ada County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan, which also acts as our Community Wildfire Protection Plan. The Boise National Forest has conducted ongoing projects for hazardous fuel removal and woody biomass utilization on properties near our Stack Rock Reserve in Boise County. What we do, or don’t do, on our adjacent lands will have an impact on federally owned lands in the Boise National Forest, as well as adjacent DOI-BLM lands.

The Boise Fire Department Wildfire Division came into existence in 2018. As we move forward, we look toward the goal of having regular seasonal fuels crews to expand our capacity for fuel mitigation, as well as outreach to homeowners through wildfire home safety evaluations. This grant will help us build capacity toward this end and will allow us to purchase a much-needed piece of equipment for use by our area partners that we would otherwise be unable to purchase.

Our personnel capacity is tapped out and we are lacking equipment to adequately mitigate wildland fuels on our public lands. Our funding for fuel mitigation has been drastically reduced over the years. We initially relied heavily on BLM Community Assistance Funds, which are tied in with their fuels budget. These dollars have become increasingly scarce. As a result, we have looked to other funding sources and are pleased to have been introduced to Coalitions and Collaborative, Inc. and the AIM grant as a potential funding source to increase our capacity on multiple levels (e.g. staffing and equipment). Thank you for this opportunity.

The Boise District BLM has been a continued partner since around 2010, possibly earlier. Through our MOU, previously mentioned, they provide support and technical assistance in matters regarding fuel reduction strategies, including fuel breaks, Rx fire, etc., with the intent to align projects that have the greatest benefit for all stakeholders. They are also a current funding entity through their Community Assistance Funds, although there are currently no additional monies available to add into our agreement.

As a member of the Southwest Idaho Resource Conservation & Development Council, a local and prominent 501(c)3, we also work with other partner members within that group to gain technical assistance and coordinate projects (e.g. Idaho Fish & Game, Ada Soil & Water Conservation District, among others). With the 2018 acquisition of the Stack Rock Reserve, which is a 1,320-acre forested area sitting up above the Boise Front at an elevation of 5,888 feet, the City of Boise WMT will be working with other partners, such as the USDA Forest Service and Idaho Department of Lands to determine best management practices for that piece of property. Woody biomass removal and utilization will most certainly be a significant component of those conversations and subsequent wildfire mitigation activities on the property.

We will measure successes through cubic yards of material removed and utilized (e.g. biochar), the number of acres treated, aesthetics (e.g. before & after photos) for recreational interests, fire size and behavior in these areas after treatment, feedback and comments from partners and constituents, etc. Our monitoring and assessment process will consist of creating data sets to track treatments, including pre-treatment and post-treatment conditions of the site(s), amount of material removed from the site(s), amount of biochar created, along with acres treated for all fuel treatments (e.g. slope-mowing, mastication, shaded fuel breaks, tree removal, etc.). This grant will substantially increase our ability to mitigate wildland fuels. We will also highlight this information through the use of ArcGIS http://bit.ly/BoiseStoryMap and will highlight our partnership with COCO through media releases and through the “Current Projects” page on our website www.adafireadapted.org .

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Ada-County-BFD-2019-Signed-1.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/BLM-Boise-City-Letter-1.pdf
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Boise-Fire-Department-T-24-Quote.pdfCity of Lakeway Wildfire Mitigation Initiative
Lake Travis Fire Rescue and the City of Lakeway
Christopher Rea
15304 Pheasant Lane, Suite #105, P.O. Box 340196
Austin/TX/78738
5126455840
5126455840
crea@ltf.org
Yes

In 1995, Travis County Emergency Services District No. 6, Lake Travis Fire Rescue, was formed providing the Hudson Bend Fire Department the financial strength to keep up with community’s needs. Our district is approximately 110 square miles comprised of ranchland and heavily forested land within the hill country of Central Texas. Our district also has three major cities including Lakeway, Bee Cave, and Steiner Ranch. Our district is located in North-Central Travis County. Development continues to boom in our district and we find urban sprawl occurring now well into the WUI. We have a total of 6 fire stations and we have around 100 personnel in our operations, prevention, medical, administration, UAV, and fuels reduction programs. After the wildfires of 2011 in Central Texas, LTFR ramped up our fuels reduction program by piloting an 8 person fuels mitigation crew and employing a Certified Wildfire Mitigation Specialist.

Fuels Reduction

This project includes the creation of defensible space and hazardous fuels reduction on private lands that are adjacent to a 90 acre greenbelt located in the heart of the City of Lakeway, TX. The City recently approved a large scale fuels reduction project that will include cleanup of all brush/dead and downed material throughout the greenbelt and the creation of strategic shaded fuel breaks. With funds through this grant, we will create defensible space on 50 properties that are directly adjacent to the shaded fuel breaks. Homeowners efforts to create defensible space will not just be a one-time effort. They will join Lake Travis Fire Rescue’s wildfire mitigation program-Wildfire Ready, to support continued maintenance of defensible space over the long-term and comprehensive mitigation efforts to effectively reduce wildfire risk. Ignition resistant construction is occurring throughout our fire district. However, funds will not be used for home retrofits for this project. The hazardous fuels reduction project that have recently been approved on Hamilton Greenbelt will help link defensible space treatments and tie into other key landscape features to change fire behavior on the landscape. Together, defensible space and fuels reduction efforts will more effectively reduce risk and help create a fire adapted community. Activities will include vegetation removal, vegetation clearing and thinning, slash removal, and vertical and horizontal clearance of tree branches.

Yes

LTFR’s Mitigation Specialist will be using this project as strategic seed money for Wildfire Ready participants to implement action items coinciding with Home Ignition Zone Assessments. The Specialist will be utilizing the Wildfire Ready, iAuditor Application, to conduct these assessments. Homeowners must be present for these one-on-one site assessments. Once the assessment is complete, homeowners receive a comprehensive wildfire mitigation plan or “To Do List” with pictures and descriptions that are site specific and customized to each home. In order to receive funding, homeowners will need to meet all of the requirements stated in the Wildfire Ready Assessment Report that they receive after the assessment. A final inspection will occur, and if passed, a Wildfire Ready Certificate will be issued to the homeowner. We are working with insurance companies and real estate to accept our certificate as formal recognition of mitigation.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Risk-Map.pdf

The greenbelt is a well-used, heavily forested recreation, adjacent to a large subdivision. The values at risk are loss of life and property. Also, the greenbelt and private properties around it are home to an endangered species, the Golden Cheeked Warbler. If a fire occurred in the area, it could mean loss of critical habitat. Furthermore, the greenbelt is large and located within the heart of the City. When a fire occurs, it has the potential to create significant embers throughout the City.

Yes
https://tx-lakeway3.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/View/17469/Lakeway-Recommendations-from-TFS—Community-%20Risk-Assessment?bidId
Yes

The funding mechanism is simple. For each individual homeowner, we will cover 50% of the total cost of mitigation per homeowner, up to $1000.00. The match will be categorized as cash match. Each homeowner will submit a bill of services/supplies to LTFR and the City for action items required in the assessment report. The funding will cover costs for approved d-space work. Also, retrofits may be required in the assessment report, but will not be tied to the funding. In order to get funding for d-space, homeowners must implement required retrofits to their homes at their own expense. Every required action item must be completed and inspected prior to receiving 50% the bill, up to $1000.00.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-5.pdf

The projects will occur on 50 private properties that are adjacent to strategically placed shaded fuel breaks throughout Hamilton Greenbelt. Work on the fuel breaks will begin in November of 2019. Eligible homeowners must reside directly adjacent to a fuel break to be eligible for funding. The fuel breaks are strategically located proximate to at-risk building and structures on private land. These projects are designed to moderate fire behavior according to the Texas A&M Forest Service’s Guidelines for Shaded Fuel Breaks. The projects were selected to link defensible space projects and shaded fuel breaks to significantly reduce risk. We cannot implement defensible space and reduce hazardous fuels in isolation. This project links these two activities together. The hazard rating for the greenbelt, which is adjacent to the homes is high to very high risk. The vegetation type is Ashe-Juniper and Oak woodlands that is extremely decadent and primed for wildland fire. Fuel types within the greenbelt and on private land consist of 1 hour to 1000 hour fuels.

The City of Lakeway has just approved $350,000.00 to remove brush & dead and downed trees within Hamilton Greenbelt. In addition, the funding will cover strategically placed shaded fuel breaks extending 100-150 feet from private property lines in the greenbelt. Funding will be eligible to anyone participating in LTFR’s Wildfire Ready Certification Program. The funding will cover all costs associated with creating a defensible space including removing hazardous vegetation around the home, creating a non-combustible zone1a around the perimeter of structure(s), and limbing vegetation up to 6-10 feet or 1/3 the height of the tree, whichever is less. We will require adequate vertical and horizontal spacing of fuels.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Homes-near-HGB.pdf

1. Grant Application is Accepted.
2. A press release will go out to media outlets to target homeowners adjacent to the greenbelt within one week of the grant notification.
3. Mailings from LTFR and the City of Lakeway will be sent out to all homeowners adjacent to the greenbelt to advertise the cost-share opportunity (within one week as well).
4. Work on the hazardous fuels reduction and shaded fuel breaks will begin in November 2019.
5. HIZ Assessment will be conducted weekly to participants
5. Within one year, we plan on having 50 Certified Homeowners in the Wildfire Ready Program, the greenbelt clean up, and shaded fuel breaks installed.

[268]
[269]
[270]

This is a mitigation project that will take place on 50 private properties that are adjacent to Hamilton Greenbelt, which is owned by the City. The greenbelt is adjacent to a large subdivision with over 100 homes, 50 of which are directly adjacent to planned shaded fuel breaks that will be installed in a one-year timeframe. The projects will protect the greenbelt if a fire started on private land and will also help to protect private land if a fire started in the greenbelt. The greenbelt is within a priority area, which has been identified in a Community Wildfire Risk Assessment, as a priority area for fuels reduction. The hope is that the project will act as a gateway to a larger landscape-scale treatment effort as the greenbelt is decadent and fire risk is high. Our goal is to create defensible space for 50 homeowners within the WUI in conjunction with approved hazardous fuels reduction to reduce risk and create a safe environment for first responders when a wildland fire occurs.

The vision of our fire department and the City of Lakeway is to help to protect life and loss of property. We recognize that our community is at risk and want to act now to help reduce risk. With budget constraints, it is difficult to complete high priority projects like this one to set an example for homeowners. This funding will act as a strategic seed to show what gold standard mitigation work looks like on the ground. Moreover, our department believes strongly in public education and outreach. This project will act as an outdoor classroom, when complete, to educate individuals about forest health, fire science, mitigation, prevention, and the ever-growing home ignition problem. This project could also set an example to promote more funds to allocated to the fuels reduction budget. Lake Travis Fire Rescue has invested in a wildfire mitigation program with a Program Coordinator, Wildfire Mitigation Specialist (funded by the City of Lakeway and Lake Travis Fire Rescue), and a seasonal

This will be a collaborative project between Lake Travis Fire Rescue and the City of Lakeway. LTFR will provide oversight by a NFPA Certified Wildfire Mitigation Specialist to help implement and complete strategic shaded fuel breaks in the greenbelt and create defensible space on 50 properties directly adjacent to the greenbelt. LTFR will also be responsible for public outreach and education efforts to sign residents up for free Home Ignition Zone Assessments, provide customized report to homeowners, conduct final inspections, certify homeowners, and review invoices from homeowners for approved mitigation practices and then send the approved invoices to the City. The City will handle the administration of the grant funds. Moreover, the Texas A&M Forest Service is a strategic partner and is in full support of this project. The Forest Service will be also using this site to educate residents about home hardening, defensible space, and hazardous fuels reduction projects.

We are using the state standard for shaded fuel breaks for this project. We believe that by extending the shaded fuel break from 100 feet from the property line of each adjacent homeowner, we are significantly decreasing the probability that a high intensity wildfire will come into contact with homes. Measuring absolute success would take a wildfire event, however, our multipurposed approach of implementing d-space with improving the forest conditions on the greenbelt utilizes the science-based approach that wildfire experts advocate for in their research and post fire studies. There are not engineering design parameters and references for defensible space or fuels treatments. Combining defensible space and fuel treatment efforts is more effective in reducing risk than any other stand-alone defensible space or fuels treatment project.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Letter-from-Chief-on-COCO-Grant.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Support-letter-for-AIM-cost-share-grant-Oct19.pdf
City of Lakeway Wildfire Mitigation Initiative
Lake Travis Fire Rescue and the City of Lakeway
Christopher Rea
15304 Pheasant Lane, Suite #105, P.O. Box 340196
Austin/TX/78738
5126455840
5126455840
crea@ltf.org
Yes

In 1995, Travis County Emergency Services District No. 6, Lake Travis Fire Rescue, was formed providing the Hudson Bend Fire Department the financial strength to keep up with community’s needs. Our district is approximately 110 square miles comprised of ranchland and heavily forested land within the hill country of Central Texas. Our district also has three major cities including Lakeway, Bee Cave, and Steiner Ranch. Our district is located in North-Central Travis County. Development continues to boom in our district and we find urban sprawl occurring now well into the WUI. We have a total of 6 fire stations and we have around 100 personnel in our operations, prevention, medical, administration, UAV, and fuels reduction programs. After the wildfires of 2011 in Central Texas, LTFR ramped up our fuels reduction program by piloting an 8 person fuels mitigation crew and employing a Certified Wildfire Mitigation Specialist.

Fuels Reduction

This project includes the creation of defensible space and hazardous fuels reduction on private lands that are adjacent to a 90 acre greenbelt located in the heart of the City of Lakeway, TX. The City recently approved a large scale fuels reduction project that will include cleanup of all brush/dead and downed material throughout the greenbelt and the creation of strategic shaded fuel breaks. With funds through this grant, we will create defensible space on 50 properties that are directly adjacent to the shaded fuel breaks. Homeowners efforts to create defensible space will not just be a one-time effort. They will join Lake Travis Fire Rescue’s wildfire mitigation program-Wildfire Ready, to support continued maintenance of defensible space over the long-term and comprehensive mitigation efforts to effectively reduce wildfire risk. Ignition resistant construction is occurring throughout our fire district. However, funds will not be used for home retrofits for this project. The hazardous fuels reduction project that have recently been approved on Hamilton Greenbelt will help link defensible space treatments and tie into other key landscape features to change fire behavior on the landscape. Together, defensible space and fuels reduction efforts will more effectively reduce risk and help create a fire adapted community. Activities will include vegetation removal, vegetation clearing and thinning, slash removal, and vertical and horizontal clearance of tree branches.

Yes

LTFR’s Mitigation Specialist will be using this project as strategic seed money for Wildfire Ready participants to implement action items coinciding with Home Ignition Zone Assessments. The Specialist will be utilizing the Wildfire Ready, iAuditor Application, to conduct these assessments. Homeowners must be present for these one-on-one site assessments. Once the assessment is complete, homeowners receive a comprehensive wildfire mitigation plan or “To Do List” with pictures and descriptions that are site specific and customized to each home. In order to receive funding, homeowners will need to meet all of the requirements stated in the Wildfire Ready Assessment Report that they receive after the assessment. A final inspection will occur, and if passed, a Wildfire Ready Certificate will be issued to the homeowner. We are working with insurance companies and real estate to accept our certificate as formal recognition of mitigation.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Risk-Map.pdf

The greenbelt is a well-used, heavily forested recreation, adjacent to a large subdivision. The values at risk are loss of life and property. Also, the greenbelt and private properties around it are home to an endangered species, the Golden Cheeked Warbler. If a fire occurred in the area, it could mean loss of critical habitat. Furthermore, the greenbelt is large and located within the heart of the City. When a fire occurs, it has the potential to create significant embers throughout the City.

Yes
https://tx-lakeway3.civicplus.com/DocumentCenter/View/17469/Lakeway-Recommendations-from-TFS—Community-%20Risk-Assessment?bidId
Yes

The funding mechanism is simple. For each individual homeowner, we will cover 50% of the total cost of mitigation per homeowner, up to $1000.00. The match will be categorized as cash match. Each homeowner will submit a bill of services/supplies to LTFR and the City for action items required in the assessment report. The funding will cover costs for approved d-space work. Also, retrofits may be required in the assessment report, but will not be tied to the funding. In order to get funding for d-space, homeowners must implement required retrofits to their homes at their own expense. Every required action item must be completed and inspected prior to receiving 50% the bill, up to $1000.00.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-5.pdf

The projects will occur on 50 private properties that are adjacent to strategically placed shaded fuel breaks throughout Hamilton Greenbelt. Work on the fuel breaks will begin in November of 2019. Eligible homeowners must reside directly adjacent to a fuel break to be eligible for funding. The fuel breaks are strategically located proximate to at-risk building and structures on private land. These projects are designed to moderate fire behavior according to the Texas A&M Forest Service’s Guidelines for Shaded Fuel Breaks. The projects were selected to link defensible space projects and shaded fuel breaks to significantly reduce risk. We cannot implement defensible space and reduce hazardous fuels in isolation. This project links these two activities together. The hazard rating for the greenbelt, which is adjacent to the homes is high to very high risk. The vegetation type is Ashe-Juniper and Oak woodlands that is extremely decadent and primed for wildland fire. Fuel types within the greenbelt and on private land consist of 1 hour to 1000 hour fuels.

The City of Lakeway has just approved $350,000.00 to remove brush & dead and downed trees within Hamilton Greenbelt. In addition, the funding will cover strategically placed shaded fuel breaks extending 100-150 feet from private property lines in the greenbelt. Funding will be eligible to anyone participating in LTFR’s Wildfire Ready Certification Program. The funding will cover all costs associated with creating a defensible space including removing hazardous vegetation around the home, creating a non-combustible zone1a around the perimeter of structure(s), and limbing vegetation up to 6-10 feet or 1/3 the height of the tree, whichever is less. We will require adequate vertical and horizontal spacing of fuels.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Homes-near-HGB.pdf

1. Grant Application is Accepted.
2. A press release will go out to media outlets to target homeowners adjacent to the greenbelt within one week of the grant notification.
3. Mailings from LTFR and the City of Lakeway will be sent out to all homeowners adjacent to the greenbelt to advertise the cost-share opportunity (within one week as well).
4. Work on the hazardous fuels reduction and shaded fuel breaks will begin in November 2019.
5. HIZ Assessment will be conducted weekly to participants
5. Within one year, we plan on having 50 Certified Homeowners in the Wildfire Ready Program, the greenbelt clean up, and shaded fuel breaks installed.

[268]
[269]
[270]

This is a mitigation project that will take place on 50 private properties that are adjacent to Hamilton Greenbelt, which is owned by the City. The greenbelt is adjacent to a large subdivision with over 100 homes, 50 of which are directly adjacent to planned shaded fuel breaks that will be installed in a one-year timeframe. The projects will protect the greenbelt if a fire started on private land and will also help to protect private land if a fire started in the greenbelt. The greenbelt is within a priority area, which has been identified in a Community Wildfire Risk Assessment, as a priority area for fuels reduction. The hope is that the project will act as a gateway to a larger landscape-scale treatment effort as the greenbelt is decadent and fire risk is high. Our goal is to create defensible space for 50 homeowners within the WUI in conjunction with approved hazardous fuels reduction to reduce risk and create a safe environment for first responders when a wildland fire occurs.

The vision of our fire department and the City of Lakeway is to help to protect life and loss of property. We recognize that our community is at risk and want to act now to help reduce risk. With budget constraints, it is difficult to complete high priority projects like this one to set an example for homeowners. This funding will act as a strategic seed to show what gold standard mitigation work looks like on the ground. Moreover, our department believes strongly in public education and outreach. This project will act as an outdoor classroom, when complete, to educate individuals about forest health, fire science, mitigation, prevention, and the ever-growing home ignition problem. This project could also set an example to promote more funds to allocated to the fuels reduction budget. Lake Travis Fire Rescue has invested in a wildfire mitigation program with a Program Coordinator, Wildfire Mitigation Specialist (funded by the City of Lakeway and Lake Travis Fire Rescue), and a seasonal

This will be a collaborative project between Lake Travis Fire Rescue and the City of Lakeway. LTFR will provide oversight by a NFPA Certified Wildfire Mitigation Specialist to help implement and complete strategic shaded fuel breaks in the greenbelt and create defensible space on 50 properties directly adjacent to the greenbelt. LTFR will also be responsible for public outreach and education efforts to sign residents up for free Home Ignition Zone Assessments, provide customized report to homeowners, conduct final inspections, certify homeowners, and review invoices from homeowners for approved mitigation practices and then send the approved invoices to the City. The City will handle the administration of the grant funds. Moreover, the Texas A&M Forest Service is a strategic partner and is in full support of this project. The Forest Service will be also using this site to educate residents about home hardening, defensible space, and hazardous fuels reduction projects.

We are using the state standard for shaded fuel breaks for this project. We believe that by extending the shaded fuel break from 100 feet from the property line of each adjacent homeowner, we are significantly decreasing the probability that a high intensity wildfire will come into contact with homes. Measuring absolute success would take a wildfire event, however, our multipurposed approach of implementing d-space with improving the forest conditions on the greenbelt utilizes the science-based approach that wildfire experts advocate for in their research and post fire studies. There are not engineering design parameters and references for defensible space or fuels treatments. Combining defensible space and fuel treatment efforts is more effective in reducing risk than any other stand-alone defensible space or fuels treatment project.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Letter-from-Chief-on-COCO-Grant.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Support-letter-for-AIM-cost-share-grant-Oct19.pdf
Missoula County Home Ignition Zone Program (HIZ Program)
United Way of Missoula County
Eric Legvold
412 W Alder St
Missoula
4065496104
4063702294
eric@missoulaunitedway.org
Yes

United Way of Missoula County is one of Missoula’s most respected, far-reaching, and effective health and human-service organizations. Founded in 1931, we have a proven track record of strengthening our community. For almost 90 years, we have stayed true to our basic mission – to build a better community for all, especially in the areas of education, financial stability and health – and to ensure that donations entrusted to us are spent wisely and well. We focus every day on advancing that mission and supporting our most vulnerable community members in Missoula, Ravalli, and Mineral counties. Our staff of 7 focus every day on developing and nurturing strong, results-oriented collaborations with diverse community partners.

Education: Imagination Library, Zero to Five Missoula
Financial Stability: Reaching Home
Health: 5-2-1-0 Let’s Move! Missoula, Project Tomorrow MT, Zero to Five Missoula
Emergency Assistance: Wildfire Preparedness (HIZ), Missoula Flood
Missoula Nonprofit Center

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction, Planning, Equipment Purchase

Wildland-urban fire disasters have demonstrated that the most critical area for preventing home destruction is the Home Ignition Zone (HIZ). Missoula County lacks trained professionals offering services specific for HIZ work. The Missoula County Home Ignition Zone Program (HIZ Program) focuses on reducing risk and catastrophic losses in the WUI through a cost-share opportunity, which encourages homeowners to reduce structure-ignition potential within their HIZ and become better prepared for extreme wildfires.

The HIZ Program is a collaboration between United Way of Missoula County (UW), Missoula County Office of Emergency Management (OEM) and Montana Conservation Corps (MCC). Operating collectively, the program develops a shared vision between community members and program partners to reach a common goal: establishing a more fire-adapted community.

Project Objectives:
Enhance the capacity for Missoula County communities to become wildfire adapted, offering services to homeowners wishing to achieve a wildfire-resilient home and property.
Effect systems change, transforming how homeowners view and approach homeownership and stewardship in wildfire country.
Develop and deploy a collective impact model through a multi-agency initiative, removing duplicative efforts and resources; streamlining skills and narrowing focus to achieve the common goal.
Honor parameters outlined in the AIM grant description.

Yes

By developing ignition-resistant communities, the HIZ Program will create safer conditions for firefighters and communities. The HIZ Program will educate, support and set standards for Missoula County neighborhoods on how to better prepare for wildfires. Local businesses also benefit by providing materials and services necessary for project completion. The HIZ Program operates in coordination with the Missoula Ranger District’s Wildfire Adapted Missoula (WAM) project. WAM aims to reduce hazardous fuels at the landscape-level; however, the majority of land ownership, 64%, within WAM is private. To that extent, the HIZ Program establishes an area in which both structures and landscapes are increasing their resiliency toward wildfire.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Fire-hazard-map_CWPP-150×150.jpg

Missoula County has a diverse set of community assets and values unique to the region, including but not limited to: private homes and businesses; public health and safety; civil infrastructure; transportation corridors; watersheds, open space and wildlife habitat; public and recreational lands; and historic sites. The HIZ Program safeguards these values by developing stronger homeowner firewise practices, resulting in a more wildfire-resilient Missoula County.

Yes
https://www.missoulacounty.us/home/showdocument?id=30120
Yes

AIM funds will be used to support budget needs in the areas highlighted in the attached budget spreadsheet. The HIZ Program’s in-kind match comes from offsetting donated supplies, equipment and time attributed to project management by UW, OEM, and MCC. Through written agreements, key partners operate as such: UW – financial, OEM – administration, and MCC – operations. The cash match will come from the private landowners in a 50/50 cost-share program. Leveraging additional matching funds, such as AIM, would help supplement the cost of the HIZ Program, enhancing project scope and implementation. UW, OEM, and MCC will continue to seek both private and federal matching resources to sustain program development.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-8.pdf

Missoula is a western Montana County crosscut by 5 major rivers. The valleys, tributaries and mountainous terrain make up a ranging mix of topographical attributes that influence local conditions, including flora and fauna distribution, vegetation patterns, and weather and climate regimes.

The vegetative communities in Missoula County are dominated by Ponderosa Pine and mixed conifer forests. Ponderosa Pine understory communities are historically maintained by low intensity, high severity fires. Mixed conifer forests, comprised of firs, spruce, and lodgepole pine, experience fire on a greater return interval, ranging from 5-50 years. Riparian woodland species and grasses and shrubs also inhabit other areas of the county. Due to recent WUI development and historic fire suppression, understory conifer encroachment has contributed to an abundance of ladder fuels, increasing the fire risk to communities and watersheds.

In general, wildfire likelihood is highest on forested, middle- to upper-elevation sites in the western and southern parts of the county. When mapped on a standard national scale for burn probability, it is clear that most of the county is in the moderate to high range of burn probability. The average annual burn probability for the county (0.01) is considered high compared to other areas of the country.

The AIM award will be used to sustain the MCC labor force, 6-8 crew members, performing recommended action items prescribed by a Certified Wildfire Mitigation Specialist (CWMS). Collectively, the crew will spend approximately 5,000 hours performing on-the-ground work in 2020. Hours will be spent creating noncombustible zones around structures, removing hazardous fuels, clearing roofs/gutters of flammable debris, chipping, and slash disposal. The HIZ Program will increase the capacity and pace at which structures are being prepared for wildfire.

UW will leverage the collaborative’s in-kind administration cost, homeowner’s 50% cost-share, and existing HIZ Program funding to match that of the AIM request.

To expand and support future HIZ projects, a necessary purchase is a 3.5 ton hydraulic dump trailer. One of the essential crew duties is to deliver and install rock mulch to create 5’ noncombustible zones around structures. Additionally, the trailer functions as a slash removal option when pile burning/chipping is not possible. Other necessary equipment purchases are brush cutters and chainsaws. All equipment will be used exclusively for the HIZ Program and require regular professional maintenance by MCC. It is critical to establish a HIZ Program equipment library, as it builds cultural ownership and best care practices for MCC crews, as well as further driving program efficacy and sustainability.

The objective is to reduce the ignition potential of 60 properties, as well as improve fuel conditions along select evacuation corridors. Treatments will include vegetation removal, installing noncombustible zones around structures, chipping, and pile burning. Wildfire Adapted Missoula (WAM), a Missoula Ranger District project aimed at restoring fire resilient landscapes on USFS land, currently focuses fuel reduction treatments in western Missoula County. In alignment with this plan, and to establish cross-boundary treatments, the HIZ Program will prioritize communities in this area – adjacent or near Missoula Ranger District land and projects.

The HIZ Program is guided by the CWPP, specifically focused on action item #13 which encourages neighborhoods to adopt firewise activities. A neighborhood ambassador program uses neighborhood leaders who champion firewise practices to promote and engage community members through a grassroots approach. In 2019, a local ambassador in a high-risk drainage arranged for over 200 assessments, resulting in 30 completed projects and a scheduled waitlist. This effort received highly positive feedback. The key players – UW, OEM, and MCC – provide project management and execution, financial services, planning and development, and meeting support. Other mission-aligned players include agencies, fire departments, and collaborative groups.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/HIZ-Map.pdf

By November 1, 2019 the HIZ Program will have completed a 10-week pilot project focused on HIZ best practices. Upon receiving AIM funds, the 2020 project timeline would follow as such:

Nov./Dec.2019 – Planning with key partners
Jan./Feb.2020 – Logistics: work calendar, ambassador recruitment, outreach
March/April – Training, Assessments & Scheduling
April/June – 10 weeks HIZ work
July/Aug. – Planning with key partners
Aug. – Logistics, Assessments & Scheduling
Late Aug./Nov. 1, 2020 – 10 weeks HIZ work

Milestones:
1) Train crews to understand wildland-urban fire destruction and how to mitigate home-ignition potential.
2) Educate the community, establish a trusted rapport, and schedule project work.
3) Reduce the ignition potential of 30 properties in the first 10-week cycle, and another 30 in the second 10-week cycle.
4) Establish a program where fuels and ignition potentials of structures are reduced, and the community is provided with a vision for how to become fire-adapted.

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[270]

The 2020 HIZ Program will increase the pace and scale of private land fuel mitigation and structure defensibility in Missoula County by offering tangible solutions provided by local experts. The program prioritizes projects where landscape-level projects on public land, outlined in the CWPP, are proposed and/or completed. This creates a holistic picture where landscapes and structures have concurrently reduced the potential for catastrophic wildfire destruction.

Currently, two of the nine fire departments in Missoula County offer fuel-mitigation services on private land. However, these departments only offer services within their jurisdiction. There is a waitlist to utilize those services, which focus primarily on fuel reduction — not reducing the ignition potential of structures. The HIZ Program fills that void by providing fuel mitigation services county-wide and offering proven services to increase ignition resistant structures in Missoula’s WUI.

It is the homeowner’s responsibility to ensure they have defensible space. The HIZ Program provides an avenue for ensuring that responsibility is attainable, which will be provided through homeowner outreach and education, and by reducing barriers (i.e. financial and physical) to achieving a more wildfire-resilient Missoula County. By changing the way residents view and approach wildfire, the HIZ Program strives to establish a systemic change in how Missoulians prepare for the next inevitable wildfire, and beyond.

Summer is wildfire season in Missoula County, often impacting community members in ways that hinder their health, financial stability and education. These areas of impact uniquely align with UW’s mission. By understanding these impacts and developing proactive solutions in a collaborative manner, we can continue to provide critical support to make Missoula County a better place for all.
The funding received would increase the longevity and impact of the HIZ Program. Currently, resources are sufficient to sustain program operations for approximately one year. This project fits into the overall vision of the Cohesive Strategy and CWPP, by creating fire-adapted communities. If homes have a decreased ignition potential, fire managers and emergency management officials will be given options for how they manage wildland-urban fires and issue evacuations. Missoula County has a wildfire preparedness coordinator located at OEM. That position will be leveraged to further sustain this program.

The following entities will contribute to the 2020 HIZ Program:

Private:
A critical supporter is Dr. Jack Cohen, providing in-depth training and program oversight. Dr. Cohen has made a firm commitment to the program. Other private supporters are Neighborhood Ambassadors, local peer-to-peer facilitation program, and are firmly committed.

Local:
Local contributors are Missoula County’s fire departments (FD’s). Currently, 2 of 9 are committed, specifically Missoula Rural and Frenchtown Rural – other FD’s are volunteer staffed. They contribute by performing assessments, seasonal fuel mitigation, equipment and technical assistance.

Tribal:
The Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes is the program’s committed tribal partner and provides support by performing assessments.

County:
OEM is the county agency providing coordination, direction and overall project management. OEM is fully committed and considered a keystone partner in execution.

State:
MCC – keystone partner – provides operations, project management, and outreach and is firmly committed. DNRC contributes by providing assessments, outreach and support, and potential resources. DNRC is a firm commitment to the program.

Federal:
USFS partners closely offering technical assistance, community outreach and assessments. 2020 HIZ projects are focused in conjunction with USFS projects.

NGO:
NGO support comes from UW, lead partner, providing technical and financial assistance, outreach and project implementation.

The HIZ Program’s short-term measure of success is the total number of homes with reduced ignition potential. A further indicator is the number of properties with projects completed adjacent to proposed, ongoing or completed large fuel-reduction projects occurring on public lands.

Long-term success will be measured by the continuation of landscape- and community-scale projects operating in conjunction with each other to achieve the 3 tenets of the Missoula Cohesive Wildfire Strategy. Additionally, we will monitor the advancement of the Neighborhood Ambassador program to measure community wildfire awareness and engagement.

We will know we have increased on-the-ground wildfire risk reduction activities by statistically analyzing data compiled year-to-year. Furthermore, we will use the DNRC’s SAM portal to monitor current property risk and to develop future HIZ Program direction and risk assessments in Missoula County.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/HIZ-LoS_Commissioners.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/USFS-HIZ-Letter-of-Support.pdf
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/HIZ-Contract_UWMCC_2019-2020_Final-1.pdfCost share program for high risk East Mountain communities
wildfire network
krys nystrom
47 sunset blvd
edgewood
15057801082
15057801082
krys@wildfirenetwork.org
Yes

Since 2016, Wildfire Network has been mentoring youth in the art and science of wildfire/forest health mitigation in the East Mountains of New Mexico. With the help of several organizations, including FAC and New Mexico Association of Counties, we have treated over 70 acres of private lands surrounded by or adjacent to the Cibola National Forest, and helped 3 communities attain Firewise recognition, with 2 more in the process. We have mentored over 20 youth, and currently have a crew of 5 who learn about wildfire behavior, tree species and their specific pathogens and insect risks, pre- and post-treatment monitoring methods, wildfire risk assessment, as well as chainsaw safety, maintenance and operation. WN’s founder has completed more than 2500 individual property risk assessments and recently completed her NFPA Certified Wildfire Mitigation Specialist (#CWMS-18-12). She also spent 14 years as a volunteer firefighter (structural and wildland), along with 8 years on a fuels crew.

Fuels Reduction, Equipment Purchase

We propose offering a cost share program to residents within the East Mountain CWPP area, focusing on Sandia Park, Cedar Crest and Tijeras to continue our successful existing wildfire/forest health mitigation program (previously funded by a 2018 New Mexico Association of Counties grant). Costs for the mitigation will be split between the grant funds and each landowner.
Work will be performed by Wildfire Network’s youth crew, a crew of four to five 18-26 year olds who are gaining real-world training in saw safety, maintenance and operation, ecological monitoring, and forest health, along with volunteer sawyers, and students from a local school.
Slash from this project will be chipped and brought to a locally owned pig farm, where it will be composted into a rich soil amendment, and fuelwood will be utilized by the property owner, taken by local firewood vendors to be processed into saleable firewood, or distributed by us to local families in need.
Each property will have pre- and post-monitoring data taken to determine changes in canopy cover, trees per acre, square footage of basal area, tons of biomass removed and fuelwood produced.
The project will continue our objective of protecting structures by creating areas that will reduce fire intensity. It will also produce jobs and training for youth, as well as provide a product for firewood producers in the area.

Yes

Since 2006, thousands of acres of public lands within the East Mountain CWPP have been treated. USFS is managing fuels on the Sandia Ranger District with hand felling, mastication, and prescribed fire. BLM, Albuquerque Open Space, Bernalillo County Open Space and the NM Land Office, also have had some mitigation projects accomplished near or adjacent to our project target areas.
The 2013 CoreLogic wildfire exposure report, identified approximately 8000 East Mountain private properties worth a combined $945 million, at high risk of loss to wildfire. Private landowners, even those aware of the need to thin, face financial and physical barriers resulting in only about 10% being treated so far.
This project, provides private landowners with a one-on-one consultation with a NFPA CWMS and up to 60% of the cost of their project provided by grant funds. The grant funding is often the only way homeowners can afford the cost of their project due to the often steep slopes and limited access.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/EMCWPP_2015_map.pdf

Homes, home-businesses, shopping areas, tourist centers such as the Sandia Peak Ski area, popular Ten3 restaurant, Sandia Tram, and numerous hiking trails. Tinkertown Museum is a well-loved and completely unique community asset. Cedar Crest and Tijeras are home to numerous small businesses, valuable hiking and mountain biking trails, and shopping centers tucked into forested areas and would create economic disaster if burned.

Yes
http://emifpa.org/emifpawp/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/EMCWPP_2015.pdf
Yes

LABOR GRANT: $40,000 spent on 40%-60% of cost of thinning each property, match $20,000 in resident payments for thinning
In-KIND MATCH: $7450 fringe (labor payroll tax at 16.5%) 5 youth at $15/hr x 30hrs/wk x 20 weeks)
MILEAGE: GRANT: $700 (460 miles @.54) 130 miles/wk x 20weeks = $1400, $700 inkind
MATERIALS/SUPPLIES: GRANT: 5gallon saw fuel/week x 20 weeks x $3/gal = $300, 4gallon baroil/week x 20weeks x $6/gal = $480, 15gal diesel chipper fuel/week x 20weeks x $3/gal = $900
In KIND: Saw & chipper maintenance (time, sprockets, chain sharpening, air filters, knife sharpening) x 20 weeks @$50/wk = $1000
CONTRACTUAL: GRANT: 8 hazard trees x $800/tree = $6400 / 50% homeowner cost = $3200 match
EQUIPMENT: GRANT:$4000 down, $4625 match

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Filled_WN.pdf

Up until about 15 years ago, New Mexico had been experiencing a period of wetter than average weather which to some extent minimized the threat of large fires, along with speeding up the growth of vegetation in this area. Many residents have lived here for as long as 50 years and did not feel a compelling need to thin due to this more moist climate. Once the weather started to dry, the overgrowth became more apparent, drought began taking a toll on many trees and insect and disease infestations became more prevalent. At that point, the prospect of having to clear out the large amounts of vegetation on these difficult, steep terrained properties became overwhelming to residents that had become older, and the costs to contract this work became very expensive. As a result, very little work has been done, and the fire threat and unhealthy conditions continues to grow.
The Tijeras area has mostly pinon-juniper with occasional ponderosa at higher elevations. Stands tend to be thick with small diameter, but tall, top heavy canopies, and an overabundance of 2-3 inch sapling understories, mixed with gamble oak. The properties are generally gently sloping, rolling hills. Sandia Park and Cedar Crest tend to have more ponderosa mixed with pinon-juniper with the same overabundance of sapling and oak understories. Properties in these areas are often steep (40%+ slopes), access is very limited by steep, winding roads and driveways. These properties do not allow for much chip spreading due to limited access and terrain, and the sheer volume of slash produced is too much to lop and scatter, making them extremely labor intensive to treat.

Broadcasting chips or lop and scattering the large volume of material needed to be taken from a good number of the properties in our project area is not feasible and would only add to the already bad fuel loading here. In the past we have borrowed a dump trailer to take chipped material to a local pig farm, however, that can be unreliable and has more than once left us needing to wait for another option. We are requesting funding for a down payment on a dump trailer to make our efforts more efficient and to more reliably be able to provide chips for composting.

We anticipate being able to mitigate 12-18 properties for a total of 20-30 acres with this funding, based upon our past experience. We will work with each individual landowner in determining an appropriate treatment, along with giving home hardening and post-fire preparation suggestions. Hand thinning will be done on all properties, and slash disposal will be chipped or slash hauled away. Chips, in most cases will be removed and hauled to a local pig farm where they are composted into soil amendments. Some properties on steeper slopes may employ the use of juniper boles and some slash for erosion control. We will employ a crew of up to 5 youth, utilize our chipper and purchase a dump trailer.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/project_map.pdf

Nov – Dec 2019 – advertising on social media for potential properties / work to thin several properties if weather cooperates / design postcard
Jan-Feb 2020 – 1 Community meeting to explain project – do mailing /
Mar-May 2020 – 2nd community meeting and project work / evaluate number of acres completed and adjust tactics if needed
June-Aug 2020 – Project work if weather permits / 3rd community meeting
Sept-Oct 2020 – data compilation and mapping / final report preparation

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This project is within the greater area of the East Mountain CWPP updated in 2015. Private lands within this project are generally rated by the CWPP as HIGH to EXTREME, and, due to the years of overgrowth, difficult terrain and financial burden of mitigation, limited mitigation work has been done. The USFS Sandia Ranger District has completed treatments adjacent to communities in Sandia Park and Tijeras, while small pieces of BLM, Albuquerque and Bernalillo County Open space lands have been treated in and around communities in Tijeras. Ciudad Soil & Water Conservation District (SWCD) and Edgewood SWCD have been providing cost-share programs for private landowners for several years in these areas as well. Wildfire Network has also utilized grant funding to provide a cost-share program for wildfire and forest health mitigation successfully for the past 2 years. We are working with the Sandia Park Scenic Byway firewise community, which is surrounded by the Cibola National Forest, in getting landowners educated on the benefits of mitigation and have gained momentum for thinning work through that outreach. Many of these thinning projects have been contiguous properties adjacent to the national forest. Keeping this momentum with these property owners is a high priority for us.

Wildfire Network, over the last 2 years has been conducting hazardous fuels reductions in the East Mountains with a crew of youth. We’ve completed over 70 acres of private land thinning and trained and employed 9 youth. We’ve also partnered with Santa Fe Youthworks on some projects, training another 20 at-risk youth. Through community meetings, Firewise groups and one-on-one consultations, we’ve built up trust with communities and landowners. As a non-profit, part of our mission is to employee and train youth to learn about, and gain appreciation for our fragile landscapes through hands-on learning. Our cost-share program makes this possible by making funding available to landowners who otherwise would not be financially or physically able to mitigate their properties. Landowners support the fact that youth are being utilized on these projects. The fuelwood produced by these projects, if not used by the landowner, increases our ability to provide heating fuel to those in need.

Private landowners are our main collaborators. They will attend community meetings, and work with us to form a plan for their property. They contribute from 30-50% in cash match to the cost of their individual projects, plus contribute chips for composting and some fuelwood. We partner with Ciudad Soil & Water Conservation District, Cibola National Forest and often NM State Forestry on public meetings and outreach. Ciudad plans and distributes flyers and social media posts, USFS contributes current knowledge and handouts, along with NM State Forestry. We also partner with private entities such as arborists, who we have take down hazard trees or trees too close to a structure to fell safely, and livestock and firewood producers for slash and fuelwood utilization.

Wildfire Network keeps a database of projects completed with dates, acreage, pre and post basal areas and TPAs, cubic yards of slash removed, cords of fuelwood produced, numbers of youth working and costs of each project. We will continue to add projects to this database while working with this funding. We utilize NM NRCS 2012 Forest Management Clipboard to estimate TPAs, along with recommended target basal areas. Maps of projects completed prior to and with this funding will show progress in are three targeted areas.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Cibola_letter.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Wildfire-Letterof-Support-10112019.pdf
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/CS_quote.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/2020-PJ-Trailers-83_x14-Low-Pro-Gooseneck-Dump-DL-16002-_-Happy-Trailer-Sales.pdfCommunity Wildfire Protection Plan Update
Lower Musselshell Conservation District
Wendy Jones
PO Box 160
Roundup, MT 59072
406-323-2103
406-323-2103
Wendy.Jones@mt.nacdnet.net
Yes

The mission of the Lower Musselshell Conservation District (LMCD) is to provide private landowners in Golden Valley and Musselshell Counties with the tools, education and resources to implement conservation practices which protect and promote the wise use of our natural resources. The LMCD was formed in 1943 with two volunteer board members and currently has five volunteer board members, one associate board member, and a part time district administrator. We currently host an outdoor classroom for the area schools, rent a No-Till drill to producers, issue 310 streambed protection permits, and have a Home Defensible Space forestry program for landowners. The district also provides tree sales, wildlife escape ramps, and other products for sale to the community. LMCD is focused on creating programs for soil health, youth educational programs, and setting up Mesonet stations for monitoring soil moisture data.

Planning

The main purpose of this project is to update the Community Wildfire Protection Plan that we currently have in place. This plan is 12 years old and needs to be updated. This will help our forestry program focus on the areas of the community that have the greatest need for wildfire mitigation. One of the objectives of our forestry program is to expand beyond Home Defensible Spaces into larger areas for landowners. We have been working with several partners to identify these areas within Musselshell and Golden Valley Counties. Although there are some project sites in mind, having a new risk assessment plan would provide a greater ability to focus our efforts in areas that have the most urgent need for fire mitigation. Our main goal is to assist landowners both large and small, in collaboration with our state and federal partners so reduce the risk of large scale wildfires in the area and reduce the loss and devastation that these fires cause.

Yes

The Lower Musselshell Conservation District has been working with several partners to identify areas of risk for public lands and private lands as well. Musselshell and Golden Valley Counties offer a mix of private lands intermingled with public lands (BLM and State). This can create an issue when trying to develop a forest mitigation plan because not all parties have the ability to work together for a common goal. LMCD’s goal is to provide a connection between landowners, state, federal and county organizations so that we can all focus on a common goal. That goal is to reduce the risk of wildfires and fuel in the area. By creating an updated CWPP, this will help to focus on the areas of highest risk with all the partners we have already been in contact with. This will allow us to look for funding opportunities to help pay for fire mitigation and also support many of the local volunteer fire departments in the area.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Wildfire-musselshell_map-1.pdf

Musselshell and Golden Valley counties are home to several smaller communities in Montana. Topographically the LMCD area is a transition area between the foothill region of west central Montana and the sedimentary plains of eastern Montana. The area is considered a Middle Latitude Steppe, which is characterized as a semi-arid region with low rainfall and low humidity. The build up of fuels combined with the varied topography and low moisture make this a high risk area.

Yes
http://dnrc.mt.gov/divisions/forestry/docs/fire-and-aviation/wui/musselhell_cwpp.pdf%20,%20http://dnrc.mt.gov/divisions/forestry/docs/fire-and-aviation/wui/goldenvalley_cwpp.pdf
No
This funding will be used to update the CWPP that was created in 2007.

We are requesting a total of 17,000 for our project. The majority of this funding will be allocated to hire a contractor to rewrite the CWPP plans for both Musselshell and Golden Valley counties. The remaining funding will be utilized to as payroll for LMCD Staff Forester. The sources of In-Kind match funding will be from volunteer time from the LMCD Supervisory Board, from our partners who have been very active in getting started with this program, and time from local Fire Chiefs and their volunteer fire departments. We will provide any necessary equipment, and will be responsible for our administrators time and all mileage for the volunteers. The Total Grant budget with be 34,000.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-Spreadsheet-Fillable-10.pdf

Musselshell County encompasses approximately 84% privately owned lands, 9.3% federal land and 6.3% state lands. About 40% of the area is forested and about half of that area is privately owned. The forested area in both counties are predominantly a monoculture of Ponderosa Pines and in many areas there are more trees per acre than have been present historically. The remainder of land in these counties is Urban or agricultural land. This area has many rural subdivisions that are susceptible to fire risk as many of them are on more forested lands. Roundup in Musselshell County is the most highly populated town in both counties. It has the only Emergency Hospital with in a 50 mile radius and is the County Seat. Both counties are vulnerable to loss of life, property, livestock and wildlife if a catastrophic wildfire should occur.

The funding for the LMCD Forester will include Payroll for 8 months of work, approximately 25 hours per month at $25 per hour. This will allow him the time needed to meet and coordinate with landowners in Musselshell and Golden Valley Counties. Coordinate with the various local fire departments in the counties and also collaborate with the consultant hired to write the CWPP.

As the CWPP has not been updated since 2007, creating a new plan will allow the local fire departments, the counties, state and federal agencies to recognize where the high risk areas are. This will also help the LMCD determine the next steps we need to take in order to education the community about fire mitigation projects. It will help identify large scale projects that encompass both private and public lands. The CWPP plan will be shared with both Counties and several other partner organizations of the LMCD to help education the public of the wildfire risk in their area. The LMCD hopes to help find funding for on the ground work for future fire mitigation and this document will help to identify those project areas.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Wildfire-musselshell_map-2.pdf

This will be a 1 year project with the following milestones and deliverables
1. Hire a contractor to complete the CWPP
2. Begin an initial assessment of at risk areas in Musselshell and Golden Valley Counties
3. Collaborate to write the CWPP
4. Finish assessment of at risk areas in Musselshell and Golden Valley Counties
5. Share the CWPP with partners and the community

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The strategic value of the project will be to have an updated CWPP and to identify the at risk areas in Musselshell and Golden Valley Counties. This document will be used to increase the awareness of fore mitigation with the counties and in the community. The information will be used to education the public and help to create future on the ground fire mitigation projects.

The Lower Musselshell Conservation District is a not for profit group that has a goal of education the public on natural resources issues and concerns. Our funding is very limited but our goals of outreach are lofty. We would like to create a cost share plan for private land owners in the future but we need a starting point. Updating the current CWPP plan is a starting point for us to make bigger plans in regards to fire mitigation projects.

LMCD is currently working closely with several different partners including:
NRCS
BLM
DNRC
Snowy Mountain Development LLC
Musselshell Watershed Coalition
Local Fire Departments
Musselshell County Commissioner
Musselshell Floodplain and Emergency Manager
We share an office space with the NRCS in Roundup. Together we hosted a local working group where it was identified that fire mitigation was a key area that we needed to focus on. The NRCS has made it a part of their long range plan and part of their Targeted Implementation Plan for this area.
We have held and will hold future meetings with the BLM, DNRC, SMD, MWC, the fire departments and county to discuss fire mitigation projects that we can do now and what we can do in the future. Each partner will work with the LMCD to create a plan to move forward to accomplish our common goal.

The most immediate measurement of success that we will have is the completed CWPP. The secondary measure of success will be how we are able to communicate this to the public and our partners in order to create future plans of action for fire mitigation projects. The CWPP will allow us to target specific areas for fire mitigation. These targeted areas will be the focus for the search for funding opportunities to start and complete on the ground fire mitigation projects for the landowners in Musselshell and Golden Valley Counties. We will be able to measure how many people we are able to reach through educational programs or materials based on the information provided in the CWPP.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/No-Support-Letter.pdf
Long-term resiliency for Communities Living with Fire
Cascadia Conservation District
Patrick Haggerty
14 N Mission St
Wenatchee, WA 98801
509-436-1601
509-436-1601
patrickh@csacadiacd.org
Yes

The Washington State Legislature passed RCW 89.08 in 1939, enabling the establishment of conservation districts in the state. In 1948, the Wenatchee-Entiat Soil Conservation District and the Lake Chelan Soil Conservation District were created. The two Districts merged in October 1973 to form the Chelan County Conservation District. In July 2007, we changed our name to the Cascadia Conservation District to prevent confusion with county government and to better meet the needs of our district members and stakeholders. We are a non-regulatory political subdivision of the State of Washington. Our district includes all of Chelan County. Our mission is to encourage wise stewardship and conservation of all natural resources for current and future residents of Chelan County. We work toward cooperative solutions that result in the greatest benefit for the greatest number of people.

Personnel Capacity, Fuels Reduction

This project will compliment landscape scale, cross-boundary planning and implementation efforts by focusing resources on local communities in high fire risk areas in close proximity to public lands in the Widland Urban Interface (WUI). Eligible communities will be near or adjacent to recent or planned forest health and restoration treatments on federal or state lands (mapped in the Chelan County Community Wildfire Protection Plan CWPP).

There is a need to support and provide financial assistance to local community scale efforts to implement fire adaptation practices. By providing small scale grants (micro-grants) these communities will be able to implement fire adaptation practices and increase their resilience to wildfire. Communities will need to complete a Community Wildfire Risk Assessment in which specific project recommendations are identified and demonstrate active participation in fire-adapted activities. The funding would range from $2,000 to $4,000 via mirco-grants for on the ground fire risk reduction work. Activities could include; constructed (shaded) fuel breaks, fuels reduction within and beyond defensible space zones, and slash removal. Communities will need to provide in-kind work in support of the risk reduction activities.

The objective will be to provide funding to implement a range of practices: critical fuel reduction and forest health restoration activities; evacuation planning and outreach and education events.

Yes

The majority of land in Chelan County is federally managed (79%). Additionally, every single address point in Chelan County is considered part of the Wildland Urban Interface, defined as being within 1.5 miles of an area that is 75% vegetated (WUI Map, Appendix B). Therefore, there are many opportunities for cross-boundary work in this region adjacent to and on public lands. Cascadia, CCFD#1 and CWSC are non-regulatory entities with a mission of providing technical assistance and other resources to communities to help them steward their natural resources. The partner agencies (Cascadia, CCFD 1 and CWSC) have proven history of working with Firewise USA communities to implement fire risk planning and fuels reduction work, and for this work to translate into cross-boundary projects with WA DNR and USFS. All partners will share project results and new opportunities through active members of the WA Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network and local forest health collaboratives.

Yes
https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/WIldfire-Risk-Map-CPAW.pdf

In 2018, Pyrologix prepared a report titled Pacific Northwest Quantitative Wildfire Risk Assessment for US Forest Service Region 6 (Scott et al, 2018). One result of the assessment was a ranked list of communities most at risk to wildfire in Oregon and Washington revealing 7 of the top ten at risk communities in WA are within Chelan County. This report underscores the importance of building and maintaining momentum for fire adaptation in our region.

Yes
https://www.dnr.wa.gov/publication/rpburncwppchelanpdf
Yes

Labor (administration and coordination): AIM award share funds will support staff time to coordinate with federal and state partners, contractors, conduct community outreach, and for general project management and administration.

In-kind match: Will be provided by community members participating in project work, meetings, and coordination.

Cash match: Required 25% cash match will be collected from participating communities for eligible services, or purchases.

Contractual: AIM award share funds will support implementation in communities with an average of $2,000 to $4,000 going towards fire risk reduction work in each community.

Indirect: AIM award share funds will cover a portion of Cascadia’s 25% indirect rate.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/AIM-Round-3-Budget-CascadiaCD-1.pdf

Chelan County is located in the dry eastern slopes of the Cascade Mountains. Federally managed lands comprise the majority of ownership and is split between the Forest Service (70%), National Parks (7%), and the Bureaus of Land Management and Reclamation (each < 1%). Private lands represent 17% of the land base. All of the homes within Chelan County are in the WUI, making increased community resilience and risk reduction key components of this project. Vegetation ranges from dense pine and cedar forest to dry ponderosa pine stands to grasslands and sagebrush ecosystems from the high elevation western portions of the county to the lower elevation arid eastern portions. Extensive areas have burned in recent wildfires within and around Chelan County (see Firewise Community Map, Appendix C) leading to evacuations, structure loss, and weeks of hazardous air quality. In 2015 over 150,000 acres and more than 80 structures burned in four wildfires across the County.

Other values at risk include wildlife, water quantity, and water quality. This region is home to several threatened and endangered species including Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and Steelhead, bull trout, and the northern spotted owl. Improving forest conditions helps to restore watershed function, combat invasive species, and reduce runoff from severely burned soils. Additional there are multiple source watersheds in Chelan County including the Icicle River, the Wenatchee River, and Lake Chelan; protecting water quality in these watersheds is important to ensure a safe drinking water supply.

The project area includes 6 watersheds identified as highest priority for Forest Health Treatments in the WA DNR 20-year Forest Health Strategic Plan. Several USFS large landscape restoration projects are underway or close to signed decisions and include goals of developing cross-boundary projects.

Partners will coordinate on a unified outreach effort. Partners will then engage with communities, develop projects and provide technical assistance to communities (completed by the partner organization with the strongest relationships in the geographic area). Staff time will be spent on coordinating with partners, outreaching to Firewise communities to solicit proposals, and provision of technical assistance for project implementation. This proposal supports approximately 600 hours of staff time for these activities. A small amount of staff time is reserved for staff to do administrative related work on this grant such as invoicing and reporting. No new staff are anticipated to be hired for this project.

No equipment will be purchased for this proposal.

This project would treat approximately 20 acres and that implementation work would include constructed fuel breaks, fuels reduction within and beyond defensible space zones, and slash / biomass removal. Communities will be sent a Request for Proposals, in which they will answer short questions about the project they would like to fund, where it is identified in a wildfire risk assessment, and how the implementation will be accomplished. A review team including CCFD#1, Cascadia CD, CWSC, WA DNR, and USFS will score and rank applications. The team identified in this application will work with communities to implement projects including technical assistance regarding compliance with local, state, and federal regulations.

This project relies on the foundation of a series of planning efforts conducted since the 2015 fire season. The DNR 20-Years Forest Health and Wildfire Strategic Plans, 2019 Chelan County Community Wildfire Protection Plan, 2017 Community Wildfire Assistance for Wildfire Report, and recent and future planning decisions developed collaboratively between Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest and the North Central Washington Forest Health Collaborative. For project specific planning the partners will lean on existing and new Firewise Community Risk Assessments, Firewise Community Action Plans, and CWPP Community Action Plans.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/Firewise-communities-Map.pdf

Winter/Spring 2020: Draft Community list based on initial eligibility criteria. Identify eligible communities based on proximity to planned or implemented federal and state lands treatments.

Spring 2020: RFP developed, sent out to all Communities

Summer 2020: RFPs returned with list of implementation actions. RFPs reviewed by team of local fire districts, CWSC USFS, WA DNR and Cascadia CD with ranking criteria. Award “Micro” grants to communities. Conduct project initiation meeting with each successful community.

Fall 2020 – Spring 2021: Implementation of project work in communities.

Summer 2021: Reporting. Identify the degree to which project goals and outcomes were met, challenges for implementations, and opportunities to share lessons learned with local and national Fire Adapted Community Learning Network.

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This small-scale or micro-grant program is an opportunity to inspire and assist communities to continue making fire adaptation a priority, and encourage community members to actively participate in state and federal collaborative planning project adjacent to them. The proposal is designed to motivate communities which have invested in community risk assessments, action plans, and have taken steps towards fire adaptation. In many areas of the county it has been almost 5 years since the last major fire, and emphasis for mitigation activities is declining. Funding is an important incentive for neighborhoods to complete critical mitigation actions identified within their mitigation action plans.

Through coordination with landscape level planning efforts the project will facilitate broader landscape level risk reduction efforts by looking strategically across Chelan County to identify communities that are already engaged in fire adapted efforts. It will then determine which of those communities could best leverage state and federal forest health work, and then providing support to complete already identified high priority mitigation actions within the CWPP. Finding resources to help communities implement identified actions underscores that these efforts are important beyond their community, and it recognizes and rewards these communities for their planning efforts.

This funding will help already identified priority projects move to implementation. Without these funds, many communities lack resources or buy-in to complete necessary risk-reduction work in the WUI. By requiring a 1:1 match from in-kind work by community members, this funding ensures that this work is supported by Firewise communities willing to put in the time and effort required to live responsibly within the WUI.

If we do not support the public in their fire adaptation efforts, we can expect more reluctance to engage and accept landscape level treatments scheduled to begin in spring of 2020.

Washington State Department of Natural Resources: technical assistance and planning on community eligibility and priority actions

US Forest Service – Okanogan Wenatchee National Forest: Coordination and planning on community eligibility and priority actions

Local Fire Districts: Coordination and planning on priority actions.

Chumstick Wildfire Stewardship Coalition: Coordination and planning on priority actions.

WA State Conservation Commission: Support for Cascadia staff time to coordinate, plan, and implement forest health projects on private land throughout Chelan County

WA Fire Adapted Community Learning Network: Network for sharing information and resources

North Central Washington Forest Health Collaborative: Collaborative group for sharing information and resources

Project success will be measured by the number of eligible communities identified (i.e. number of communities actively engaged with up to date work plans adjacent to state and federal restoration work), the number of projects completed on the mitigation action plans, the number of acres treated for fuels reduction or other mitigation work, and the number of homes within the WUI that have reduced their fire risk. On a larger landscape scale, the number of projects implemented adjacent to other projects will also be a measure of success. Staff from Cascadia, CCFD 1 and CWSC will document work implemented by cataloging in-kind hours worked by individual landowners and by providing before and after photos and producing maps of the areas treated. Mitigation action plans in the CWPP will also be updated to reflect any implemented work and any change in risk level as a result. A report on accomplishments through this program will be provided at the annual CWPP update meeting.

https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/CCFD-1-Letter-of-Support_AIM-Grant.pdf, https://co-co.org/wp-content/uploads/formidable/20/DNR-Letter-of-Support-COCO_201910.pdf